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MAY, 1904. 



CONTENTS 



Why Educate Our Girls 

The Meaning of an Ideal 

Editorials _ - - 

Locdis • - • 

Reminiscences of First Year's Students 

Improvements 

Our Town 

What They Think 

Keystone Literary Society Anniversary 

A Staunch Friend 



f 
1 

4 
6 
8 
9 
9 
9 
10 

to 



Your Money Back 

If you are not satisfied with the 

Merbal Remedies 

FOR SALE BY 

J. H. BALMER, 

Graduate in Pharmacy, 

Eiizabethtown, - Penn'a. 

F. C. Fisher's 
BARBER SHOP 

S. Market St., Eiizabetbtown. 



A. W. Martin 
COAL. GRAIN . 

FLOUR and Feed. 

Telephone. 

Elizabcthtown, - Pa. 
E. E. COBLE 

OPTICIAN AND JEWELER 

Centre Square, ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



3D. K. MIjft^I^Tiasr 

Clothing and Gent's Furnishings 

Centre Square, Elizabethtown, Pa. 



S; P. Engle 

Dry Goods^ 

Notions^ 

Groceries; 

Shoes, 
Hats, 

Carpets, 

Oilcloths and 

Millinery, 

ELIZABETHTOWN, - PA. 



Horst's Restaurant 

All Flavors of 

Ice Cream ^ Soda Water 
Full Line of Confections 



n 



Centre Square. 
EllZASETHTOWN, 



PA 



"¥0?l 



Yen ARE SAFE HERE " 



No matter what you want, 
or how you want it made, it 
can be had from 



DAVIS, The Tailor 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



0m College Cimeg. 



Wisdoiu is the Principal Thing.'''' 



Vol. I. 



Elizabethtown, Pa., May, 1904. 



No. I. 



Why Educate Our Girls ? 

BY E. M. 

From the ranks of young girls of today 
shall come the mothers and other influ- 
ential women of tomorrow. Some one 
has said, "Men are what their mothers 
make them." Difi"erent great men, among 
them John Wesley, John Quincy Adams, 
Abraham Lincoln have said, "All that I 
am and ever hope to be, I owe to my 
mother." Another author has said, "The 
hand that rocks the cradle is the hand 
that rules the world." Since the influ- 
ence of a mother is so great, and since the 
impressions that she leaves upon her 
children are such lasting ones, should she 
not be educated so as to be able to do the 
very best for her children? Or there may 
be teachers or reformers, influencing the 
lives of children not their own. 

Woman is not only honoring herself in 
the business world, because of the good 
work she does at the desk, but her pres- 
ence in business places has a refining in- 
fluence, if she be properly educated. Her 
womanly qualities, her patience, her 
devotion, tranquillity and conscientious- 
ness will always prove helpful. 

A teacher or mother should have some 
knowledge of Psychology as a guide in 
training and educating a child. Think of 
the many unfortunates, invalids, wrecks, 
because of mother's or teacher's lack of 
knowledge in Psychology, Physiology, 
Ethics and other branches of study. 
Many American women sinfully neglect 
duties which pertain to the health of their 
children from one week's end to another. 



During the winter not a few mothers 
keep their little ones in overheated and 
poorly ventilated rooms and as a result, 
we find them, as spring approaches, weak, 
puny and afflicted with colds, coughs, 
sore throats and other ailments. Mothers 
with a knowledge of Physiology will 
understand that upon the daily enjoyment 
of fresh and open air depends in a great 
degree the health of their little ones, as 
well as themselves. 

An educated, consecrated mother or 
teacher will instill into the minds of those 
under her care, lessons of a Savior's ex- 
ample; of the importance of truth and 
the horrors of a lie; of the virtues of in- 
dustry, kindness, obedience, sympathy 
and self-sacrifice. 

As a result of all these lessons and care- 
ful training, there will go forth into the 
world, reformers, evangelists, emancipa- 
tors — all working together for the up-lift- 
ing of mankind. 



The Meaning of an Ideal. 

BY D. C. R. 

An ideal is a conception proposed 
by the mind for imitation, reali- 
zation, or attainment. It is that which 
is conceived as a standard of excellence, 
or taken as an ultimate object of attain- 
ment. An investigation into the psychol- 
ogy of ideals reveals the fact that there are 
two opposing views held regarding them 
by psychologists. The majority of writers 
on the science of the mind regard ideals 
as products of the imagination. Ideals 



OUR COLLEGE TLMES. 



are intentional creations. Out of revived 
experienees, the iiiiajiination constrncts 
new forms ealled iiieais:. Ideals are no- 
tions of realities; they are constructed out 
of reals and may become realities. (1) 
"Ideals are our nearest mental approach 
to perfection." They are representations 
of that which is perfe(!t, or which we 
esteem so. (2) Prof. \Vm. James says: 
"Ideals are something intellectually con- 
ceived; something of which we are con- 
scious if we possess it. Our judgments 
of the worth of things depends on the 
feelings which the ideas arouse. Hence 
we are incapable to judge the worth of 
ideals often." (8) Says Prof. J. M. 
Baldwin: "Ideals, are conceptual feel- 
ings, i . e. something felt in connection 
with pre.sent images. A feeling of fitness 
attaches to certain images of imagination 
which are available for conceptual con- 
struction, and which take form in ideals. 
(4) In contradistinction to the views just 
quoted, Dr. Dewey holds that "the will 
is self realizing itself; it is always holding 
itself before itself. The will has a dual 
function: first, as ideal will, it is the source 
of ideals; second, as real will, it is the 
actual self. The ideal will serves as a 
spur to the actual self to realize itself. 
The will does more than set up the ideal. 
It is also the activity which realizes this 
ideal. The ideal is a constant motive 
power. The will as ideal and the will as 
actual have not been truly unified so long 
as choice is necessary. T" religious 
will does not recognize the dL^alism be- 
tween the "ill as it is and the will as it 
ought to be. It declares God as the Per- 
fect Will. The Perfect Will is the source, 
the motive, and the realization of the life 
of the individual." (5) Ideals grow with 
enlarged experiences. In youth the ideals 
are apt to be low and sensual if not an 
atmosphere of refinement is the environ- 
ment. Education puts the youth into 
artificial conditions where the worthy 
ideals of the best civilizations of the world 
are passed Ijefore him for his choosing. 
It should be the aim of formal education 



to raise the individual from a sensual life 
governed by instinct and passion to a 
moral life governed by reason and high 
purpose. Man's original nature nmst 
become the servant of his ideal nature. 

All progress and education result from 
efforts to realize ideals. As one ideal is 
attained, a new ideal is set as a new in- 
centive to work; and the higher ideal is 
not consciously felt till a lower one is first 
attained. Ideals are relative to the con- 
dition of the mind of the person who 
proclaims them. To keep out of prison 
may be the thief 's ambition, but this is no 
conscious ideal for an honest man. There- 
fore ideals are not absolute, but relative to 
the mind that entertains them. Each 
step upward gives us a new standpoint to 
view the world, a new outlook on life, 
and consequently the possibilities for a 
new ideal. It is the highest function of 
an education to widen the mental horizon, 
and multiply ideals by bringing new ones 
into view. 

Ideals are possessed by everyone pos- 
sessing a sane mind. But merely the pos- 
session of ideals is not sufficient to make 
life significant. A worthy ideal may be 
the foundation of a grand life. The 
power of the imagination over life is 
apparent from the fact that it creates the 
ideals of conduct and character. The 
worth of life is determined by the char- 
acter of the ideals. Cherishing low ideals 
or even tolerating them has a disastrous 
tendency. A corrupted imagination suf- 
ficiently accounts for many a shipwrecked 
life. 

The ideal serves as a working model. 
It gives motive to all acts, inspires effort, 
and largely determines movement and 
progress. Herein lies the power of ideals. 

The boy thinks his own mother better 
than any other in the world, and that 
fact essentially determines his future 
manhood. The force of the ideal lends 
domestic affection its chief charm. It is 
this that makes our friends admirable 
and makes us esteem them so highly. 
( Continmd on page 7. ) 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES. 

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OUR COLLEGE TIMES. 



€>ur College Cimes. 

EDITORIAL STAFF. 
EDITOR IN CHIEF : 
I. N. H. BEAHM. 

ASSOCIATE editors: 
D. C. REBER, I. E. SHOOP, ELIZABETH MEYER 

SPECIAL editok's : 
Loral Editor, - - M. ALVERDA STAYER 
Society Editor, - SAMTTEL S. SUMPMAN 

BVSINUSS MANAGEMENT : 

Managing Editor and Business Manager, 

H. K. OBER 

ASSOCIATES : 
J. M. MILLER, . I. E. OBERHOLTZER 

Onr College Times is published bi-monthly. 
Subscription price (six numbers) 25 cents, single 
copy 5 cents. 

This is the first issue of "Our College 
Times." This new paper is now being 
published in the direct interest of the 
college and of true education. It is num- 
bered among the growing needs of Eliz- 
abethtown College. It will ever foster 
the spirit of loyalty to truth, justice, love 
and wisdom. As the name indicates, it 
will set forth the times and events of the 
college. It will be a common medium, 
through which the friends of the college 
will keep in touch with the work and 
with each other. A good share of public 
favor and patronage is solicited with the 
earnest hope that the same will be fully 
merited and sustained. It is hoped that 
it may serve a noble purpose in the cause 
of learning, and tend only to the further- 
ance of the gospel of true education, in 
general, and prove a living, active agent 
in behalf of Elizabethtown College, in 
particular. 



This new periodical will be issued bi- 
monthly, and is christened, "Our College 
Times." "Times" means the events and 
general doings of the school. "Our" is 
a familiar word, homelike, expressive of 
unity and commonness. "College" ap- 
pearing between the words Onr and Times, 
naturally puts on its lowliest appearance, 
comes in a mild and modest form and 



withal, it is rather an ajipropriate and 
modest title, and at the same time has the 
jingle that flavors of poetry. 

Students are busv. 



Commencement approaches. 



Subscribe for "Our College Times." 



Seven persons compose the graduating 
class. 

Commencement Day. June Kith. Yon 
are invited. 



The trustees of the college have already 
employed a number of their teacJiers for 
the next session. 



The electors of the college will meet 
commencement week. Three trustees 
will be elected. 



We hope to iuiprove "Our College 
Times" from issue to issue. Room is 
being left for such progress. 



^ J. M. Miller of Lititz, and D. L. Landis 
of Manheim, are giving fine service in the 
supply of heat and water at the College. 

The next catalogue will be ready for 
distribution by Commencement. It will 
contain some new features. You siiould 
have one. 

The subscription price to "Our College 
Times" is only twenty-five (25) cents 
per annum. How many subscriptions 
can you send in ? 



Joseph H. Rider is one of the stannch- 
est friends of the College. He is the old- 
est and most quiet of the Board of Trus- 
tees, but his sympathy and interest are 
deep. The school people all hold him in 
great respect. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES. 



In our next issue we expect more scope 
and variety. 

True education is a great enemy to pride. 
True education tends only to the develop- 
ment of the better elements in man, and 
to their predominance. Anything else in 
the educational line is pointing in the 
wrong direction. 



The daily scene in Commercial Hail is 
a livelv one. 



The managing editor finds that the de- 
mand will be so great for Our College 
Times that he has doubled his order for 
the first two issues. This is a great ad- 
vantage to our "ad" customers. They 
will appreciate it, too. 



Our managing editor. Prof. Ober and 
his associates, J. M. Miller and I. E. 
Oberholzer, have been remarkably suc- 
cessful so far in establishing "Our Col- 
lege Times." They deserve place in the 
roll of honor, and they are hereby so 
placed. 

It is appropriate that a special sermon 
should be delivered to the graduating 
class. This discourse is usually called the 
"Baccalaureate Sermon." It will be 
deliverefl in the chapel, Sunday evening, 
June 12th, by Elder 11. E. Light, Mount- 
ville. Pa. _^^^___ 

A great work was done last year in a 
financial way through the Trustees and a 
large number of generous contributors. 
Indebtedness was cleared. A new build- 
ing was erected. More furniture and ap- 
paratus were added. The sun was made 
to shine brighter. Thanks to everybody! 



If Elizabethtown College will succeed, 
she must be pre-eminent along certain 
lines She must afford better openings in 
certain directions than any other Insti- 
tution in her field of effort. Now, what 
shall these leading characteristics be? 
Please write a letter to the Editor-in-chief, 
and say just what you think on this 
subject. 



The Brethren should be the best in- 
formed people in the country. Why ? 
1. They take such strong grounds on im- 
portant questions. 2. They have firm 
convictions on so many leading issues. 
3. They assume to teach the broad law 
of God which tends to the narrow path of 
righteousness. 

Prof. G. N. Falkenstein, late principal, 
and trustee S, H. Hertzler are delegates 
from Elizabethtown to the Brethren gen- 
eral conference to be held in Carthage, 
Mo. Elizabethtown should be well repre- 
sented by these men. Prof. Falkenstein, 
now our book merchant, was also wri- 
ting clerk at the recent District Meeting 
in Lebanon county. 

The business management, in securing 
"ads" for "Our College Times," have 
certainly pressed the matter in a very 
tactful manner, else they have found a 
host of friends instantly ready to become 
our customers ; perhaps it is not ex- 
actly either one or the other, but a com- 
bination of both. All our "ad" custom- 
ers are reliable, and their names in the 
paper are not only an advertisement of 
their business, but a testimonial of the 
College as well. "Our College Times" is 
pleased to have such a host of reliable 
business men as its customers. 



On the one hand Brother Beahm would 
be very much pleased to do more minis- 
terial work at his home, but having obli- 
gated himself quite a while in the past to 
a number of duties away from home, he 
is compelled to await more favorable op- 
portunities in the future. On the other 
hand he is much pleased to note the fact 
that the ministry in Elizabethtown is 
both ample and efficient, and therefore 
be is all the more at liberty to be away 
from home. The good people of Eliza- 
bethtown have been very kind to Brother 
Beahm, and he appreciates it largely. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES. 



The Brethren's District Meetiii<r for the 
Eastern District of Pennsylvania was held 
on the 20th ami 21st of April, in Lebanon 
county, at the Heidelberg meeting house. 
The meeting was largely attended, and in 
many important respects was a most 
eommendableone. Elder I. W. Taylor of 
Lancaster county, was Moderator. Elders 
Jacob Longenecker and I .AV. Taylor, were 
chosen by the meeting to represent the 
District on Standing Committee at next 
Annual Meeting, to be held in Carthage, 
Missouri. The church at Heidelberg is 
noted for its numbers and hospitality. 
Ev^ery convenienct and accommodation 
was afforded the puT)lic. This church is 
presided over by Elder John Herr. 

All those who would like to see Eliz- 
abethtown College be what they think 
it ought to be, let them put their hand to 
the work, and help shape the character 
and destiny of the Institution. Their in- 
fluence will be felt most and best by 
taking hold of the work and helping. 
The College is going to be just what we 
make it. It is not a question any more, 
seemingly, as to whether there will be a 
College among us in this section of the 
State. But there is a question remaining; 
and that question is. What kind of 
school shall this College be? That will 
be determined by the workers in it, and 
the spirit which they instil. Every- 
body has a chance to make himself felt in 
the entire character of the school, but he 
must take hold.. 

Elizabethtown College has a great 
naission. Will she fill that mission ? It 
ia her desire to be lo3'aI to the principles 
of true Christianity and the i:)eople among 
whom she has cast her lot. 

The students of the college especially 
will be interested in short, spicy, amusing 
reports from the four quarters of our ter- 
ritory. 

We want your subscription for "Our 
College Times. "■ 



LOCALS. 

Miss Lizzie Zortman is in school again 
and is looking well. 

John Miller of Lititz, spent Sunday, 
Apr. 24th with his mother. 

Miss Emma Young visited at Landi.s- 
ville over Sunday, April 24. 

Miss Kaufl'man, of Juniata Co., is visit- 
ing her sister, Mrs. Reber, at present. 

Miss Luella Fogelsanger, '03 is still the 
employe of Mr. Soflis, of Woodbury, N. J. 

Miss StaufFer spent Sunday, Apr. 17tb 
visiting her uncle, Mr. Mumma, near 
Marietta. 

Prof. Ober and family spent Sunday 
Apr. 24th at bis parents' home near 
Mastersonville. 

Trustees. H. Hertzler, preached near 
Tolna, York Co., on Sunday, Apr. 24th, 
and the week following. 

Miss Minnie Ginder, of Mastersonville, 
recently spent a week at home. Back in 
school looking bright. 

Miss Mary Longenecker spent Sunday, 
Apr. 24 at the home of Miss Anna Gru- 
ber, near Bachmanville. 

John H. Stayer of Woodbury, Bedford 
county, enrolled as a commercial student 
at the opening of this term. 

Charles Shoop was absent from the 
college over Sunday, Apr. 24th, visiting 
his parents at Enterline, Dauphin Co., Pa. 

The class of 1904 held Arbor day exer- 
cises on the campus, Apr. 22, at 4 P. M. 
Mr. Garman was the orator of the occasion. 

I'rof. Beahm is to conduct a series of 
meetings in Carthage, Mo., prior to the 
Brethren's annual conference to be held 
at that place. 

The organization of the class of 1904 is 
as follows: Pres., Mr. Kieffer; Sec, Miss 
Stayer; Treas., Mr. Harry Lehman; 
Historian, Mr. Shoop. The other mem- 
bers of the class are Messrs. Gish, Gar- 
man and Henry. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES. 



Miss Elizabeth Myer, acc-onii)anied by 
Misses Buckwalter and Hertzler, ?peiif a 
few days of vacation visiting tier sisters in 
Philadelphia. 

During the past winter some of the 
professors and students attended Local 
Institutes at Middletown, Baohnianville, 
Mt. Joy and Elizabethtown. 

Miss Bessie M. Rider, '03, employed as 
stenographer at the Buch manufacturing 
establishment, Elizabethtown, Pa., is a 
frequent caller on College Hill. 

The class-room apparatus for teaching 
chemistry was greatly improved by the 
addition of a laboratory and the necessary 
chemicals. m. a. s. 

The enroUmenl for this term is 72. 
Among the new students are fourteen 
public school teachers representing Lan- 
caster, Dauphin and Lebanon counties. 

Dr. Reher and family, and Prof. Beahm 
attended the Brethren's conference of the 
Eastern District of Pa., held at Myers- 
town, Apr. 19 and 20. Others from the 
College who attended this meeting were 
Misses Lehman and Layser, and Messrs. 
Herr, Light, Musselman and J. G. Myers. 

Recently A. J. Bashore was called to 
attend the funeral of his grandfather, 
John W. Bashore, who had reached the 
ripe age of 97 years, 5 months and 11 
days. Last year this old man visited tiie 
('ollege. He was the oldest man that 
ever entered the building. It also was 
the first and last time he visited an insti- 
tution of the kind. However, he was a 
friend of education. 



The Keystone Literary Society of the 
Elizabethtown College. 

This society was organized for the pur- 
pose of giving to its members an excellent 
training along literary lines. Truly such 
is the tendencv. S. S. 



The Meaning of an Ideal. 

( Continued from page 2). 
The patriot is he who has enthusiasm for 
his nation's ideal. The hero is he who 
unselfishly pursues a noble ideal. It is 
this that unifies society to a great extent, 
gives unity to life, and causes the star of 
hope to rise perennially in the human 
heart. 

The ideal is not all of life, but at least 
an essential factor in the making of char- 
acter. If the intellect ideally aspires, 
and the heart sincerely admires, then the 
will gradually acquires strength and virtue, 
and realizes the heart's desire. But as 
old ideals vanish, new ideals enter the 
mind and the pursuit to realize them is 
again renewed. The inventor follows a 
plan or ideal; an invention results. The 
teacher implants ideals of a noble life, and 
character results — not a sentimental show 
of character merely, but depth and solidity 
of character adorned by manly virtue. 
The art of living becomes true art when 
ideals become conscious guides. 



Elizabethtown College has lots of 
friends; the number has greatly increased. 
Mav it ever so continue. 



Exchanges, Etc. 

Every school and college receiving this 
first issue of "Our College Times" is in- 
vited to place us on their exchange list. 
All who will do so will hereafter receive 
this periodical regularly. 

The following magazines and period- 
icals come to the college reading room 
free : Elizabethtown Chronicle, Semi- 
Weekly New Era, Lancaster Examiner, 
Middletown Journal, Middletown Press, 
Lebanon Daily Times, Mount Joy Herald, 
Gospel Messenger, Inglenook, Congres- 
sional Record. 

Friends of the school send Record of 
Christian Work, Literary Digest, an<l 
Scientific American. Few contributions 
to the college are more highly appreciated 
than donations to the college library and 
reading room. Already two dozen diflfei'- 
ent newspapers and magazines come reg- 
ularly to the reading table. 

The management is very grateful for all 
these literary favors. D. C. R. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES. 



Reminiscences of First Year's Students. 

[An extract from the Anniversary number of the 
Litemry Echo]. 

We cannot picture for yon the present 
or prospective position and con<lition of 
all those who were numbered with us 
during the first year, but shall cite to 
you as many as lies in our power. 

Mr. Kurvin Henry, of Bifjmont, Pa., 
the first student, has since become an 
able teacher in the rural schools near his 
home. 

Miss Anna Breneman, of New Danville, 
Pa., first lady student, after leaving: this 
place, spent almost a vear in the employ 
of the Brethren Publishinar House, at 
Elgin, 111. She now resides at her home. 

Mr. Rufus Bucher, of Mechanic Grove, 
Pa., after having spent one year with us, 
was elected to the ministry, and is al- 
ready gaining distinction in that field. 

Mr. Warren Ziegler, of Royersford, Pa., 
is termed a first-class pedagogue by peo- 
ple of Freeman, Pa., where he was teach- 
ins. 

Mr. Ober Morning, of Elizabethtown, 
Pa., having very successfully taught the 
school at Bellaire during the past two 
years, is again a student here, further de- 
velopine his rare abilities. 

Mr. Samuel Hess, of Trappe, Pa., is 
another example of the well-trained and 
able teachers whom this College sends 
out. He has taught two successive terms 
at Mount Zion, Pa., and is now at his 
home. 

Mr. Jacob Meyer, of Fredericksburg, 
Pa., has returned to the College again 
this term after having made a most bril- 
liant debut in teaching near Lancaster. 

Mr. Walter Kittinger, of Ambler, Pa., 
soon after his departure from the College 
accepted a position with an Electrical 
Supply Company, of Philadelphia, which 
position he still holds. 

Mr. Willis Heisey, of Elizabethtown, 
Pa., has for a couple years been in the 
employ of one of the leading merchants 
of that town. 

Mr. Allen Hertzler, of Elizabethtown, 



Pa , having spent almost a year in the 
employ of Hertzler Bros. & Co., is now 
at this place (completing the Commercial 
Course. 

Mi.ss Elizabeth Brinser, of Elizabeth- 
town, Pa., while a student here, received 
a call from the Kreider Shoe Mfg. Co., 
to become their stenographer. She still 
holds that position. 

Miss Anna Gise, of Elizabethtown, Pa., 
one more bright name in the roll of suc- 
cessful teachers, is at the College again 
this term, having taught near her ho>ne 
the past two years. 

Miss Olive Gingrich, of Milton Grove, 
Pa., is devoting her time to the study of 
Instrumental Music. 

Miss Lydia M. Buckwaiter, of Lancas- 
ter, Pa., is one of the two lady students 
who chose teaching as a profession. 
Having completed her term in teaching 
near Lancaster, she is again a student 
here. 

Messrs. Harry and Ezra Lehman, of 
Elizabethtown, Pa., are now here com- 
pleting the Commercial Course. 

Of the other members of that first year, 
we can say comparatively nothing, so ex- 
tending our beet wishes to them and 
their friends, we bid adieu to the spring 
term of 190L Lydia Buckwalter. 

An Excursion. 

Saturday afternoon, April 30, the Bot- 
any class took its first great excursion. 
Under the management of the writer and 
A. .J. Bashore, an outfit made up of two 
prancing steeds and a royal wagon kindly 
furnished by ^lessrs. ].,ehman, Longen- 
ecker and Engle, was on hand — rather 
late, but sure. 

The objective point was the Donegal 
Springs. Rare specimens were gotten. 
We laughed and talked. Then talked 
and laughed. 

The party was composed of Misses 
Myer, Young, Buckwalter sisters, Stauf- 
fer, Cassel, Hess, Kline, Hertzler, and 
Messrs. Myer, Zug and Engle. All en- 
joyed the trip. Roswell Zug. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES. 



Improvements. 

The new telephone connection will be a 
handsome improvement. It will likely 
be the independent. 

Arrang:ements are being effected by 
which the Water Co. of Elizabethtown 
will supply the college. 

A handsome bookcase is being made 
by Daniel Heisey, under the supervision 
of the committee; and it is hoped it will 
be in the Library room before Com- 
mencement. 

There has been talk for sometime upon 
the part of Mr. B. G. Groff and others 
with reference to grading a drivewaj' 
around the College, planting hitching 
posts, repairing the sidewalk, etc. Mr. 
Grof}', who is superintendent of the Col- 
lege grounds, and one of the ablest sup- 
porters of the Institution, is very much 
interested in these improvements, and he 
has now promised that after corn plant- 
ing, and his return from Annual Meet- 
ing, this work shall be done. Brother 
Groff's promise always means the things 
to come. It is expected that there are 
others that will join in helping to put 
this improvement into fact, and we look 
forward with pleasure to these new fea- 
tures. 

Oup Town. 

Elizabethtown is a thriving, busy place. 
It has a population of nearly two thous- 
and. Its educational facilities are among 
the best. Church privileges are excellent. 
It is surrounded by a good country, thick- 
ly settled by an industrious, painstaking 
people. These good people in both town 
and country are rapidly growing in their 
favorable estimate of Elizabethtown Col- 
lege, and it is to their interest to do every- 
thing in their power to advance this grow- 
ing institution of learning in their midst. 
They will. The College is delighted to 
count so many friends in the community, 
as well as elsewhere. The town and 
country adjacent, are furnishing a hand- 
some local patronage, and the best of it is, 
the patrons are pleased with the progress 
of their sons and daughters. 



WHAT THEY THINK. 



For thoroughness in class-room work, 
Elizabethtown College stands almost 
pre-eminent. Mary B. Hess. 



The class-room methods are up-to-date, 
thorough, practical, judicious and force- 
ful- Ober Morning. 



The Commercial Department offers ad- 
vantages equal to the best. 

H. K. Garman. 



Our Faculty of six members, is genial, 
co-operative, well-educated, proficient. 
Minerva Stauffer. 



The student body conforms to right 
conduct, acting in accordance with right. 
Ira Musselman. 



Advantages of Typewriting. 

Typewriting opportunities are offered 
by efficient machines and the famous 
touch svstem. Harry Lehman. 



Commercial Department. 

Demands necessitated a Commercial 
Department here. This affords a practi- 
cal business education. 

Walter K. Gish. 

The College. 

It stands central within a circumference 
passing through Lancaster, York, Harris- 
burg, Lebanon. W. G. Baker. 

Why I Like Elizabethtown College. 

Because of the many excellent oppor- 
tunities it affords. It seems home-like. 
Every student feels like a member of the 
large family. Its methods are up to the 
times. Its faculty is composed of the 
best material. You get what you want. 
Above all, because of the kindly interest 
that the teachers manifest in the student. 
Because it is just the place for anybody 
who wants a good home while at school. 

I. E. S. 



lO 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES. 



K. L. S. Anniversary. 

Friday eveuiiip, April 8, shall long be 
pleasantly reiiieinhered by the members 
of the Keystone Literary Society as the 
date of its third anniversary. Mr. Oliver 
Heisey was president of the meetins?, with 
Miss Olive Uingrich as secretary. The 
program throughout was of a high order 
of excellence. 
The following features were rendered : 

Music, "Anthem," The Choir. 

Address of Welcome, Prof. Beahm. 

Essay, "No Pains, No Gains," 

Bessie M. Rider. 
Oration, "The Supreme Issue," 

Ober Morning. 
Male Quartette, "Bells of Freedom," 
Dr. Eeber, Messrs. Stayer, Mussel man, 
Myer. 
Recitation, "Picnic Sam," 

Minerva Stauff'er. 
Editor's Paper, "Literary Echo," 

Lydia Buckwalter. 
Duet, "Lovely Spring Time," 

Misses Hess and Stayer. 
Lydia M. Buckwalter. 



A Staunch Friend. 

The College Library is growing slow 
but sure. It contains some very good 
books, and that is the kind we desire. 

Bro. C. H. Balsbaugh has donated quite 
a number of books to the library. We 
trust he may give us more. 

I am personally acquainted with him 
ever since I know anyone. He is a warm 
friend of the College. He has a great 
desire to pay us a visit. 

We trust (jod will speed his recovery, 
so that he may shortly stand within the 
walls of the Eiizabethtown College. 

A. J. B.4SEHORE. 



Our associate editors use only their re- 
spective initials. 



Items of interest for our paper are solic- 
ited from all friends. 



The new catalogue will show several 
additional names to the faculty the next 
year. 



€li^afaetI)totcin College 

Founded in 1900 with three teachers and .six pupils, 
closes the fourtb year with a total enrollment of 
106 students. It airT)S to afford facilities for the at- 
tainment of a true cducatior). Its teachers are 
trained and experier)ced and they are actuated 
by conscientious motives. Situated on a beau- 
tiful elevatioQ overlooking the town and many 
land.scapes, a more desirable locatioQ for a school 
is hard to find. 

A 17-acre campus, moderr) building, up- 
to-date courses of study are some of its numerous 
advantages. Write for new catalogue- Next 
session begins September 5, 1904, with cQlarged 
faculty and additioQal improvements. 

For particulars, address 

D. C. REBER, Prin., Eiizabethtown, Pa. 



£^ 



>y§ 



CONTRACTOR and BUILDER 

COAL, FEED, GRAIN, 
LUMBER and STONE 



Elizabethtowu, 



Pa. 



e. R. LEICHT 

BUILDER OF 

FI/NE VEHICLES 

REPAIR WORK A SPECIALTY 

Elizabethtown, - - Pa. 



H. U. COBLE 

MARBLE AND 
GRANITE 




,8IAW 

II^VERY DESCWPnOJ 



nATERIAL 

N^^6ag^v^-i^'« AMP WORKMANSHIP 
CV^ ^itj-CW^^ QUARANTEEO' 
1 



Steps, Sills, 

Paving Stone 

Call or write for prices. 
ELIZABETHTHTOWN. - PA. 

Near Centre Square. 



All the News in the 
ELIZABETHTOWN CHRONICLE 

ONLY THE BEST JOB PRINTING. 



J. C. HEIN'5 

Shaving^ Haircutting 

PARLOR 

S. Market St. Elizabethtown, Pa. 

O. 8 eeeRSOLe 

Call to see our full line of 

GROCERIES and PROVISIONS 

Famous Chick Feed For Sale. 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

HARRY MILLER 

CABINET MAKER AUD UNDERTAKER 
FULL LINE OF FURNITURE 

S. Market St. Elizabethtown, Pa. 

ISAAG R. tieRR 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

Lancaster Office, 33 North Duke Street. 



GEO. A. FISHER 

Hardware, Typewriters 
and Sporting Goods 

We furnish College students and others with 
Typewriters and Athletic goods. Write for prices 

ELIZABETHTOWN. PA. 



DR. ARA\STRONG 
D E3Sr TI3T 

Crown and Bridge Work a Specialty 

West High Street, Elizabeth town i Fa> 



6 Per Cent. Guaranteed 

without tax, by the 

STATE CAPITAL SAVINGS AND LOAN ASS'N 

H. H- STERN 
ELIZABETHTOWN, - - PA 



Drs. Blough and Overfield 

PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

E. Higb Street. ElizabethtoWQ, Pa. 



A. BUCK'S SONS CO. 

Manufacturers of the Famous 

EAGLE LAWN SWING 

LAND ROLLERS, CORN SHELLERS, WHEEL BARROWS, &C. 





We know you want one of 
these ssvings. Write for prices 



Our Foundry department 
supplies every description of 

Troughs, 
Castings, Etc. 

Call and see us or write and we will give desired information. 

Both Phones. E I iza bethtowH , Pa. 



ANCHOR SPRING W^AGON W^ORKS 




H. H. NISSLEY, Prop. Manufacturers of 

BUSINESS WAGONS AND DEALERS IN PLEASURE VEHICLES OF MODERN DESIGNS 

W. HIGH STREET. ELIZABETHTOWN. PA. 



GEO. KERSEY 

DENTIST 

£. High St, near Center SquarOi Ellzalethtown. 



SINGER t BRANDT 

LUMBER YARD 

W. High St.. 
Telephone. Elizabethtown, Pa. 



STUDENTS and PROFESSORS 

aa well as other people will be made to feel at home when they come to our store, 

J. N. OLWEILER, the leading Clothier and Men's Furnisher. 
Agent for Lebanon Steam Laundry. ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



A STORE 



With Big Sales, and Small 
Profits for a Principle, and with 
assurance of Best Service, is 
Bringing Satisfaction and Suc- 
cess. Let me have your mail 
orders for Bibles, Re(i Letter Tes- 
taments and Sunday School sup- 
plies. History of ttie Brethren 
church ; cloth, SM.OO, morocco 
11.50. 

0. N. FALKENSTEIN, 

Books, Stationery and School Supplies, 
Elizabethtown, Pa. 



■va 



Mil 



Coal 

Grain 

Flour 

Feed 

Paving Stone 

Building Stone 

Ballast, Lime and 

Farm Implements 

Telephone. RhcefTISy Pd. 



JACOB FISHER 

Watchmaker t Jeweler 

spectacles and Eyeglasses 
FITTED. 



Centre Square. 



Elizabethtown, Pa. 



We 
Invite You 

To come and inspect our 
lines suited to your personal 
wants. 



Dry Goods, Staple and 
Fancy Notions, Clothing, 
Shoes, Etc. 

PLAIN CLOTHING 

a specialty. 

HERTZLER BROS & GO. 

CENTRE SQUARE, 

Elizabethtown, - - Pa* 



J. OYER, President. 



W. S. SIVIITH, Vice Ppes. H. C. LEWIS, Cashier. 



General accounts solicltsd. Interest paid 
on Special Deposits. Safe Deposit Boxes in 
Steel, Burglar Proof Vault, for rent. 



J. DYER, 

B. G. GROFF, 

W. S. SMITH, 



Dl RECTORS 
E. C. GINDER, 
PETER N. RUTT, 
EM'L DEMMY, 



J. S. R4SSER, 
AMOS G. COBLE, 
E. E. COBLE. 



J. 1/C. KUHInT, Jr. 
CHOICE B-REAB A/ND CAKES 

Weddings and Parties Supplied witJ) pancy CaKes at Si)ort Notice. 
S. IWrARBZET ST , ELIZ ABEJTKtTO WKT, IPA.. 



GEISE & McBRIDE 



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Page Wire Fence a Specialty. 

FARM IMPLEMENTS OF ALL KINDS 

Agents for Foos Gasoline Engines and 
Universal Plows. 

CLIZABCTHTOWN. _ - _ p^. 

BALMER'S BAKERY 



Choice Bread 

Rolls and Cakes 

OF ALL KINDS 

S. MARKET STREET, ELIZABETHTOWN. 



The 
A. D issinge r 

Store 

General 

Merchandise 

BARGAINS 

EVERY 

WEDNESDAY! SATURDAY 

J. Harry Brubaker, Manager, 

Elizabethtown, - Pa. 



f 



Our College Times 






*^ ^ 



aEU^abetfjtoton College, 

€U5aftctl)totim, jj&a. 



«^ <i^ «^ 






JULY, 1904. 



CONTENTS 



Address on Commencement Day 3 

A Good Meeting ... 3 

A Happy Couple - - 6 

All's Well that Ends Well 

A Good Word r 

A Nice Testimonial 

An Excellent Paper 

Commencement 

Editorials 

Election of Trustees 

Elder Light's Sermon 

Every Denomination 

Farming 

Final Examination 



7 
7 
7 
10 
6 
4 
6 
8 
9 
3 
9 



Good Work . . - lo 

He Likes "Our College Times" 6 

Honorable Mention - - 7 

Locals 8 

Loyal Church Members - - 9 

Our New Faculty - - 1 

Returning to School - - 10 
Student Body of E'town College 5 

Strong Langus^e ■ - - 10 

School Re-opens - - - 10 

The New Chapel - - - 7 

Write ... 7 

Well Done ... 8 

Yearly Program - * - 2 



■# 



Your Money Back 

If you are not satisfied with the 

Merbal Remedies 

FOR SALE BY 

J. H. BALMER, 

Graduate in Pharmacy, 

Elizabethtown, - Penn'a. 

F. C. Fisher's 
BARBER SHOP 

S. Market St., Bllzabctbtown. 



A. W. Martin 
COAL. GRAIN . 

FLOUR and Feed . 

Telephone. 

Elizabethtown, - Pa. 
E. E. COBLE 

OPTICIAN AND JEWELER 

Centre Square, ELIZ.^BETHTOWN, PA. 



Clothing and Gent's Furnishings 

Centre Square^ Eiizabethtown, Pa. 



S. P- Engle 

Dry Goods; 
Notions^ 

Groceries^ 
Shocs; 



Hats. 



Carpets, 

Oilcloths and 
Millinery^ 



Horst's Restaurant 

All Flavors of 

Ice Cream ^ Soda Water 
Full Line of Confections 



Centre Square. 
ELIZABETHTOWN, 



PA 



ELIZABETHTOWN, 



PA, 



"YOU ARE SAFE HERE" 



No matter what you want, 
or how you want it made, it 
can be had from 



DAVIS, The Tailor 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



0m CoUeje t!:ime0. 

''Wisdom is the Pvincipal Thing'''' 



Vol. I. 



Elizabethtown, Pa., July, 1904. 



No. 2. 



Our New Faculty. 

There has been a little change in the 
faculty from last session. Prof. Beahm 
has taken his old position, to which he 
was called at the founding of the College. 
He was the first teacher whom the Trus- 
tees elected, and that, before the ground 
was broken for the college building. 
Through illness he has not done much 
school work lately, but for the past two 
years his health has made such encourag- 
ing improvement that circumstances 
advised his entering measurably into his 
profession again. He is hopeful of good 
results and pledges his earnest service in 
behalf of true education and the Christian 
church. He is an ardent believer with 
others, that Elizabethtown College should 
excel in general quality and christian 
virtue. He is also a strong advocate of 
thoroughness in education, in the devel- 
opment of thought power, of critical 
ability, and of common sense; and further, 
of liberal and technical education as well. 
He is a student of books, of things 
and of men. Thus, returning to the 
presidency of the college, bringing 
his fund of experience and training, and 
being surrounded by a good Board of 
Trustees and an excellent body of teach- 
ers, it is hoped that his administration 
will be marked with good results. 

Dr. D. C. Reber is now Vice-President 
and Registrar of the college. For about 
two years he has had charge of the college 
as its head, with gratifying results. With 
magnanimity he accepted the return of 
the first president to office. Dr. Reber 



finished two courses at Juniata College — 
the English and the Classic. After his 
graduation, he was a member of the fac- 
ulty there for a number of years. Later 
he took the pedagogical course in the 
University of New York City and re- 
ceived the degree, "Doctor of Pedagogy." 
We now call him "Doctor." Being 
backed by these rare opportunities of 
liberal education and professional train- 
ing, he continues his work as a member 
of the faculty of Elizabethtown College, 
with assurance of rendering efficient ser- 
vices. Dr. Reber is conservative in natural 
turn of mind. He is a thorough student, 
of the German type, and is an indefatig- 
able worker. He is a happy combination 
of simplicity and dignity. All applica- 
tions for special information, catalogues, 
etc., should be addressed to Dr. D. C. 
Reber, Registiar. 

Prof. H. K. Ober is btill with us. He 
is principal of the Commercial school, in 
which department he has done very ac- 
tive service. His genial manner and 
versatile genius entitle him to the re- 
spect in which the students hold him. 
He has been a successful teacher in the 
common schools of Pennsylvania, and 
was graduated from Millersville in the 
class of 1898. Prof. Ober is Acting Trea- 
surer of the Board of Trustees, also the 
secretary and treasurer of the Adminis- 
trative Committee. He is ready, earnest, 
practical, considerate. Students will set- 
tle their accounts with him next session. 

Prof. Elizabeth Myer is a part of the 
institution, and a prime factor at that. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES. 



Sim is the only member of the faculty 
who has taught constantly from the 
opening of the college, and the only one 
who is a member of the electoral board. 
She was graduated from Millersviile and 
is noted as one of the leading teachers of 
Lancaster county, Pa. She is a good 
teacher, energetic and executive. Miss 
Myer is the preceptress of the college, and 
therefore is chief in charge of the Ladies' 
Halls. 

Prof. P. S. Davis is a new name in the 
faculty. He is young and strong. He 
comes to us, recommended as one of the 
few able school men. He was graduated 
from Prince William Academy in the 
English Scientific Course, Class of 1902. 
Prof. Davis is a member of the Brethren 
(thurch, and we anticipate good results 
through his services at the college. He 
is first in charge of the gentlemen'^ hall. 

Prof. W. H. Sanger, an A. B. graduate 
of Bridge water college. Class of 1904, and 
a minister of the Brethren church, is Prof. 
Pittenger's succesor. Prof. Sanger is rec- 
ommended for loyalty and scholarship- 
He will be in charge of the third story 
gentlemen's hall. Brother Sanger, good 
work is expected of you. 

Prof. Flora Herring Good was graduated 
in the Teachers' Training Course of music 
at Bridgewater College in the Class of 1901. 
Since then she has been teaching and 
taken post-graduate work. She isa nuem- 
ber of the Brethren church and recom- 
mended as an active, christian worker 
and good teacher. She has charge of the 
music, both vocal and instrumental. 
With her careful guarding of this depart- 
ment, under a wise and fostering hand, 
we anticipate that she will furnish not 
only melody for the college, but karniony 
as well. Music is one of those branches 
of artistic sciences peculiarly adapted to 
refining and elevating the soul. Miss 
Good will have charge of the third story 
ladies' hall. 

After completing the Commercial Course 
as a member of the Class of 1904 at the 



Elizabethtown College, Mr. I. E. Shoop, 
a member of the United Brethren church 
and a native ot Dauphin county, will 
assist in the Commercial school as in- 
structor, and pursue several studies in the 
college as student. Mr. Shoop has made 
an enviable record here, and we expect 
good things of him now and in years to 
come. He will be the genial retailer in 
the book room. 

Miss Luella Fogelsanger, Class of 1903, 
Elizabethtown College, returns from her 
position in Woodbury, N. J., in a similar 
capacity to that of Mr. Shoop. Her 
friends are delighted to know that she 
will be at the college again. Her home 
is in Shippensburg, Pa. 

During the special Bible Terra of next 
January, Elder J. G. Royer of Mount 
Morris, one of the foremost educators of 
the Brethren church, will be the main 
teacher and preacher. Something rich 
and rare is in store for us. 

Eld. S. H. Hertzler who taught during 
last bible term will teach again. He 
needs no introduction to Eastern Penn- 
sylvania. 

Other members of the faculty will do 
work on several important and practical 
phases of the Bible and Bible Work. 

With the foregoing corps of instructors, 
everybody can be assured of good services 
at Elizabethtown College. A strong 
faculty is presented. 

Yearly Program. 

I. How to get Trouble. 

1. Meddle with the duties of others. 

2. Be absent when duty calls. 

3. Trample on the rights of others. 

II. How to be Happy. 

1. Attend to your own duties. 

2. Serve promptly and willingly. 

3. Consider the rights of others. 

III. How to Succeed. 

1. Be honest. 

2. Be diligent. 

3. Keep at it. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES. 



Farming. 

Every person who labors honestly and 
faithfully is a [Success so far, but there is 
no other business so fundamental in its 
character as that of farming. The farmer 
is pre-eminently the producer, and if 
there is any business that should be done 
kindly above any other, it is that of 
farming, and in order to do the work in 
the best possible manner the person must 
be active and energetic in acquainting 
himself with the business. The person 
who knows nothing about books may not 
be a good farmer, and the person who 
knows all the books and nothing of the 
farm certainly will be a failure as a far- 
mer, but it is certainly true that the more 
a person knows about the farm and farm- 
ing, whether it is taught on the farm or 
in books, the better he is in the business. 

Should a farmer be educated ? Cer- 
tainly. No man is so practical or able to 
use his learning as the farmer. Evidently 
give me a farmer that is a student, a stu- 
dent of both books and things. A farmer 
must know something and he must do 
something. To know something and do 
nothing is a failure, and to know nothing 
and do little is also a failure. Farmers 
should be educated, not like a doctor or 
a lawyer, or a civil engineer, or a 
statesman, but he should be educated 
in plants, animals, seeds, soil, cultivation, 
etc., etc. 

Many of these things he can learn best 
only in a school of a high grade. Eliza- 
betlitown College is a good place for a 
farmer, and the idea should be discussed 
more and more: "How can we educate 
our Doys and girls and at the same time 
keep them in the grand old business of 
farming?" As a rule, no man has better 
and sounder judgment than the farmer. 
That is the cause he is so situated that he 
can use what knowledge he has to such 
good advantage. The person who is to 
be a farmer can succed all the better be- 
cause he is skillful in practical arithme- 
tic, in keeping accounts, in understand- 



ing business papers, physiology, natural 
philosophy, chemistry and such like 
branches. 



Addresses on Commencement Day. 

Addresses were delivered by Elder T. 
T. Myers of Philadelphia, and ElderT. F. 
Imler of Norristown. Brother Myers 
spoke beautifully. He dwealt impress- 
ingly on three special words, "Sincerity, 
Thoroughness and Perseverance." The 
graduating class and everybody else was 
well pleased. 

Brother Imler made a diplomatic appeal 
for help in behalf of the Administrative 
Committee. The very kind disposition 
of the people in general, to assist, was 
again clearly visible. 1104.42 was the 
amount of the collection. Thanks to 
everybody contributing! This fund will 
be used in further equipping office, reci- 
tation rooms and on the yard. 

For the addresses, "Our College Times" 
extends a vote of thanks to these gentle- 
men. Come again, brethren ! 



A Good Meeting. 

The Missionary meeting held Saturday 
evening, June 11th, proved a very help, 
ful and inspiring one, because of the 
spirit manifested in it in the discussion 
of the various topics and the earnestness 
shown to know more about the great 
cause of Missions, which is the work of 
the Church. All that the Church does 
or can do that meets her Lord's approval 
falls under this head. 

A request was sent to the Church Coun- 
cil asking for the privilege of forming an 
organization which will have for its pur- 
pose the direction of its members in a 
course or courses of reading that will 
stimulate interest in Mission. Let all 
feel that this is the Lord's work, and it 
will be productive of great good. 

J. M. PiTTENGER, 



OUR COLLEGE TIMP:s. 



€>ur College Ctmes* 

EDITORIAL STAFF. 
EDITOR IN CHIEF : 

I. N. H. BEAHM. 

ASSOCIATE editors: 
D. C. REBER, I. E. SHOOP, ELIZABETH MEYER 

SPECIAL EDITORS : 

Local Editor, - - M. ALVERDA STAYER 
Society Editor, - SAMUEL S. SUMPMAN 

BUSINESS MANAGEMENT : 

Mnnaging Editor and Business Manager, 

H. K. OBER 

ASSOCIATES : 

J. M. MILLER, I. E. OBERHOLTZER 

Our College Times is published bi-monthly. 
Subscription price (six numbers) '25 cents, single 
copy 5 cents. 

Vacation is on. 



All is quiet on College Hill. 



Happy vacation to everybody! 



Subscribe for "Our College Times." 



Be sure to send in something spicy for 
the next issue. 

Elizabethtown is one of the best towns 
in the countrv. 



Will you not bring a student with you 
for September 5? 

J. K. Ney furnished the College excel- 
lent milk service. 



Ask Prof. Pittenger how he likes the 
life of a Benedict. 



School opens again September 5. Bring 
a student with you ! 



Miss Minerva Stauffer will spend her 
vacation in Marietta. 



Miss Opal Hoffman will spend her vaca- 
tion in Philadelphia. 



Many old students and special friends 
attended the Commencement. 



There is nothing naughty about the 
class of this year — except the naughty 
four ('04). 



Read the new catalogue through care- 
fully. It has a number of new and strik- 
ing features. 



Engage your room at the College as 
early as possible. Write to Dr. Reber 
about it. 



A. J. Basehore had a big trip west and 
returns in fine spirits. He attended 
Commencement. 



Prof. J. H. Keller attended Commence- 
ment. He says Henry will return next 
session sometime. 



Professors Reber, Ober, and Beahin 
hope to do considerable canvassing during 
vacation. Look out for them ! 



Under the direction of our excellent 
Superintendent of the grounds, B.G.GrofJ', 
J. K. Ney is mowing the campus. 



President W. C. Hanawalt, of Ijords- 
burg College, California, was a visitor on 
College Hill, Commencement Day. 



The Class of '04 has the good wishes of 
"Our College Times," whose columns are 
open to them for remarks. Speak ! 



The Elizabethtown Chronicle executes 
the printing of "Our College Times." 
The job speaks for itself. Long live the 
Chronicle! 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES. 



We expect to write up the several 
members of the Board of Trustees for our 
next issue. They will be sized up one by 
one. Look out, Brethren. 



. Following Commencement, H. K. Gar- 
man, '04, spent some days at the College 
in active service, before taking his future 
position as stenographer and accountant. 



Mr. S. B. Kiefer has accepted a position 
in the Grammar school at Lititz. Here's 
to your success. Prof. Kiefer. Miss M. 
AlVerda Stayer has also accepted a very 
nice position. 



We congratulate the Brethren at Eph- 
rata on the neat, well-arranged, and 
comprehensive program for July 3 and 4. 
They have the right idea as to how Chris- 
tians Ghould spend the 4th of July. 
Brother Beahm expects to be there. 



The Board of Trustees have taken a de- 
cided position on the playing of match 
games with outside teams. It is just 
what parents and true friends of educa- 
tion want to hear. The faculty endorses 
their action. Read it elsewhere in these 
columns. 



The grand-parents of Mary and Howard 
Bittner visited the College after Com- 
mencement. They are well pleased that 
their grand-children have attended the 
College. They also say that another 
student is coming from their neighbor 
hood next fall. 

Mrs. Beahm, who has served as matron 
the past session, will continue. Misses 
Mary Longenecker and Clara Layser 
rendered faithful assistance. The latter 
remaining a week after Commencement 
to help Mrs. Beahm set everything in or- 
der; tnen she will be off for a vacation, 
too. 



The Student Body of Elizabethtown 
College. 

The conduct of our students during 
this year has been remarkably uniform, 
that is, each one seemed to know why he 
or she was going to school — seemed to 
realize that every moment counts, and 
due to these conditions is the fact that all 
of our students, without a particular ex- 
ception, have been hard-working, earnest, 
faithful boys and girls. 

Nearly every one of our students was 
here at his own expense, in other 
words, paying hard-earned money, which 
he had already earned or expects to earn 
and return to his parents or other friends 
at some future time. And of course, 
wherever such is the case one always 
finds honest, industrious, hard-working 
students, who know why they are at 
school. This can very forcibly be said of 
our student body this last year. Boys 
and girls who are at school under such 
conditions seldom, if ever, give any 
trouble in the way of misbehavior or 
misconduct and with grateful pleasure do 
we record these favorable characteristics 
of so pleasant a school family. 

So long as Elizabethtown College shall 
stand for true education and that high 
Christian virtue upon which it was found- 
ed, shall we expect nothing different, but 
rather an increase in thoughtfulness, 
kindness, tenderness, and Christ-like con- 
duct for such must be the results when 
her halls are filled with young men and 
women of a type similar to those to whom 
we have lately bade farewell. May she 
ever prosper in her noble purpose of lead- 
ing young minds to larger fields of use- 
fulness, clearer views of life, loftier 
thoughts, and nobler deeds. h. k. o. 



Sister Mary S. Geiger of Philadelphia 
attended the Commencement. She is a 
good friend to the College. Her visit was 
much appreciated. She is a sweet, 
motherly woman of nearly four score 
years, and more friends. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES. 



Commencement. 

Cnnmieiicemcnt Day i)r(ii)er dawned 
beautifully, and visitors began to pour in 
early until the Chapel was lilled to over- 
flowing, many being crowded about the 
doors and in the halls. The exercises 
opened at 9 a. m. with congregational 
singing, and prayi^r by Eld. Jesse Ziegler 
of Koyersford, Pa. 

The choir then sang an anthem entitled 
"The Lord is in His Holy Temple." The 
other featuies of the progranune were as 
follows: 

Oration, ''The Essentials of Success," 
H. K. Garman; Declamation, "ThevStory 
Which the Ledger Told," John B. Henry; 
Male Quartette, "Rock of Ages;" Reci- 
tation, "How the Refugees Were Saved," 
H. H. Lehman; Oration, "The Influence 
of Environment," S. B. Kiefer; Declama- 
tion, "The Home in the Government," 
W. K. Gish; Female Trio, "Sweet and 
Low," Misses Hess, Kline and Stayer; 
Class Histor}^ I. E. Shoop; Oration, 
"Launching," M. Alverda Stayer; Pre- 
sentation of Diplomas, Dr. D. C. Reber; 
Address to 'Graduates, Elder T. T. Myers 
of Philadelphia; Anthem, "Blessing and 
Honor;" An Appeal, Eld. T. F. Imler; 
Quartette, "'Tis the Time for Us to Part." 

The appeal was so well made by VAd. 
T. F. Imler, that the result was a contri- 
bution of $104.42. E. M 



He Likes "Our College Times." 

A letter from home — That is what "Our 
College Times" proves to be to students 
who formerly attended College. 

As one away for a little season, but ex- 
pecting to be one of the returning by 
fall, I cherish it as such; because it gives 
the news of the College Family; because 
it gives all the news of the College Home. 
James H. Breitigan. 



A Happy Couple. 

Noted for his quiet and easy manner, 
Prof. .J. ^L Pittenger of Covington, Ohio, 
came to membership in the faculty here 
at the opening of school last fall. Some 
months ago be was chosen by the Sunday 
Schools of southern Ohio to be a mission- 
ary in India. This trend of matters was 
ratified by the General Mission Board of 
the church. Hence, he will cast his lot 
among the heathen of far away India. 
Prof. Pittenger attended the Brethren's 
late conference at Carthage, Mo., and en- 
route thitherward, he saw proper to stop 
at Huntingdon, Pa., to take unto himself 
a wife, which he did very successfully in 
t le person of Sister Florence Baker of 
Maryland. "Hunting is done." Annual 
Meeting was the wedding tour. Both 
were set apart for foreign mission work. 
He will spend the vacation in Marvland 
and Ohio, and stop at Elizabethtown be- 
fore he sails from New York in October. 
Brother and Sister Pittenger have the 
good wishes and prayers of Oar College 
2'imes. 



If Elizabethtown College must fight the 
good fight of faith to maintain her moral 
integrity, she is ready for the conflict. 



Election of Trustees. 

June 16, the Electoral Board met and 
elected three trustees. T. F. Imler and 
and J. H. Rider were re-elected. L. R. 
Brumbaugh of Denton, Md., by request, 
on account of distance, was succeeded, 
and that by the election of S. G. Graybill 
of Elizabethtown. We are- sorry to lose 
Brother Brumbaugh from the Boa>'d. We 
are glad, however, to have so active a 
man as our neighbor, his successor. 

There is a pressure brought to bear 
upon a number of our students, and others 
to go to a larger school; but our young 
people say that the careful and special at- 
tention received in the smaller classes of 
Elizabethtown College is all but invalu- 
able, and they decide in favor of Eliza- 
bethtown College. Good argument, too. 
"Thou reasonest well Plato, it must be so." 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES. 



The New Chapel. 

How about the new chapel ? The agi- 
tation for a new and larger chapel at the 
College has begun. Our needs along this 
line may not be realized at once, but it is 
high time to agitate, and in due time the 
work should be done. 

The Trustees, and many f»thers, felt the 
great need on Commencemant Day. The 
same is true on Bible Term occasions. 
When will the new building come? The 
friends of Elizabethtown College may 
answer this question. Remember, the 
agitation has begun. 



All's Well That Ends Well. 

Now that there has been quite a little 
agitation over the base-ball match game, 
it is a happy thought to know that the 
matter is settled. Read what the Trus- 
tees have to say in another column of this 
issue. Whatever may have been done or 
said, they have landed at tlie right place. 
They are supported ably by teachers and 
students, in their action. Friends of the 
institution, in discussing the matter, will 
do well in holding up this safe and cour- 
ageous position set forth by the Trustees. 



A Good Word. 

"Our College Times" is published in 
the interest of the Elizabethtown College 
cause. It is the medium by which we 
hope to keep in touch with our friends 
and make new friends for our cause. 
"Our College Times" will give you full 
value for your su])scription. We trust 
"Our College Times" will be accorded a 
generous reception by its readers. 

H. K. Garman. 



Sister T. T. Myers and Master Leon 
were among the guests of the Commence- 
tnent. Leon is a great boy and took 
special delight in playing on the College 
campus with a play wheel-barrow. Leon, 
we want you to be a student at Elizabeth- 
town College some future day. 



Honorable Mention. 

The little folks were delighted with 
Mr, C. W. Shoop as teacher. Mr. Shoop 
is a bright and kindly disposed young 
man. "Our College Times" hopes he 
will be on hand for school September 5. 
There is some kind word for all those 
who taught the "young idea how to 
shoot," among whom are mentioned 
Misses Stauffer, Ginder, Stayer, Cassel, 
Booser, Gise and Messrs Samuel Meyer, 
W. G. Baker, I. E. Shoop. 



A Nice Testimonial. 

A bright, newsy paper entitled "Our 
College Times," was a pleasant visitor to 
our sanctum a few days ago. It is brim- 
ful of interesting matter gotten up by a 
corps of efficient editors connected with 
the Elizabethtown College, which ex- 
cellent institution of learning it so well 
represents. Its typographical appear- 
ance is also fine, and "Our College Times" 
is a credit to all concerned in its publica- 
tion. The Chronicle. 



Write. 

Kindly write a letter to "Our College 
Times" from the vacation field, and give 
us a chance to publish it, in part or as a 
whole, in our next, issue. The editor 
would like to have a number of spicy 
letters, full of your whereabouts to glean 
from, for the next issue of "Our College 
Times." If you wish to hear from others, 
let them hear from you. Practice the 
golden rule, please. 



Prof. Beahm enjojed his trip to An- 
nual Meeting, Carthage, Mo., very much. 
He brings back an interesting report. 



The Board of Trustees held two sessions 
at their last convention. Impoitant is- 
sues came before them and seemed to 
have been wisely met. Such meetings 
make history. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES. 



LOCALS. 

HV M. A. S. 

Mr. 1. K. Oberholtzer has a scliool in 
RajjFio township. 

Mr. Mornino; has again been appointed 
teacher of Bellaire school. 

Mr. Samuel Hess, a former student of 
this College, was a pleasant caller on June 
11. 

June 11 will long be remembered by 
the class of '04 since it was their final 
examination. 

Mr. Wendell Baker of Elizabethtown 
has received the appointment as teacher 
of Fairview school. 

A number of the students attended the 
Commencement Exercises of Mt. J03' 
High School, May 6. 

Mr. Herr in company with Miss Martha 
Heisey of Elizabethtown, visited at Eph- 
rata over Sunday, May 29. 

Miss Minnie Ginder of Mastersonville, 
has received the appointment to teach 
Hossler's school, Rapho township. 

Prof. Ober and Mr. John Miller 
attended the Commencement Exercises 
of the Lititz High School, June 2. 

Mr. James Breitigan was a pleasant 
caller on College Hill last Wednesday. 
James has engaged his room for the fall. 

Miss Emma Young expects to enter the 
Walter Sanitarium near Wernersville on 
June 20, to take the Nurse Training 
Course. 

The readers of "Our College Times" 
will be pleased to learn that Miss Luella 
Fogelsanger, '03, has accepted a position 
here and will return to the College next 
fall. 

Miss Elizabeth Myer spent Saturday, 
May 14, with her mother at Bareville. 
On her return Sunday she addressed the 
Children's Meeting in Lancaster and 
attended the lovefeast in the evening. 



Miss Lydia M. Buckwalter spent Sun- 
day, May 29, at her home in Lancaster. 

Miss Elizabeth Zortman, '06, expects to 
attend the Juniata College Commence- 
ment on June 23, and afterwards visit 
Miss M. Alverda Stayer of Woodbury, 
Bedford county. 

A number of our students passed the 
Teachers' examination under Prof. 
Brecht. Among the number are Misses 
Cassel, Ginder, Gross, Shank, Gruber, 
Booser, and Messrs. Geib, Meyer, Morn- 
ing, Oberholtzer, Baker. 



Elder Light's Sermon. 

The farewell sermon to the graduating 
class 01 1904, or as it is generally called, 
the Baccalaureate sermon, was delivered 
by Elder H. E. Light, of Mountville, Pa. 
The sermon was spicy and thoughtful, 
and much appreciated. The Elder took 
for his theme, "al/ari," which he dis- 
cussed under four heads : 

1. What man was. 

2. What he is. 

3. What he may be. 

4. What he must be. 

He showed in the process of his sermon 
that every man, with the conditions 
furnished hiin, is the maker of his own 
destiny. 

Well Done. 

Before noon, Saturday, June 18, all the 
students had moved from the College. J. 
M. Miller was the last to pack and leave. 
He has engaged his room for the fall and 
is DOW on the Physical Culture commit- 
tee. J. M. has made a good record. After 
the issue was fully sprung, he and 
J. Z. Herr fought valiantly for the 
College, and helped to turn the tide in 
the right direction on the match game 
question. J. Z. is a son of Elder John 
Herr. 



"Our College Times" has received many 
compliments. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES. 



Loyal Church Members. 

In every community and among every 
number, there are some members of the 
church that are more strictly loyal than 
other-s. We should naturally look to 
these loyal members as examples and 
leaders. In Elizabethtown College, this 
loyal class of our membership should be 
largely represented, and the faculty will 
make special efibrt to encourage them, 
and stand by them. The faculty will 
endeavor to keep in line and lead the way 
for proper example in church loyalty. 
All the members of the church, attending 
the school, should make up their minds, 
before they leave home, that they will do 
all in their power to help in the plain 
doctrines of the church, as well as to 
make advancement in other lines. Mone 
of our members should desire to live a 
fashionable life, while there may be room 
for improvements occasionally; and we'd 
better drop oflF certain things that are 
worldly in their tendency, rather than to 
put on. The Apostle admonishes "to lay 
aside every weight." Parents, please see 
that your children, who are members, 
are exemplary in their attire before they 
come to school and encourage them to 
remain so, and the College will co-operate 
with you. We want everything at the 
College to be of such a character as to 
make the humblest feel at home. All 
true, education must have Christ as the 
highest ideal. Come ! Welcome ! Let us 
enroll yoii on September 5. A cordial 
solicitation to everybody. Help make 
next session the best and biggest in our 
history. Let every member be loyal. 



Every Denomination. 

As a matter of fact, the Elizabethtown 
College was in.stituted especially for the 
Brethren and their children, and her 
doors are open especially to all members 
of the church and to their children ; but 
on the other hand the doors are also 
oj)en to everybody, regardless of creed, 
and they are not to be intimidated on ac- 



count of their honest, religious convic- 
tions. Among the student body of the 
last session, there are those M'ho are not 
personally members of any church, and 
there are those personally who represent 
nine different religious denominations : 
German Baptist Brethren, Lutheran, 
United Brethren, United Evangelical, 
Presbyterian, Reformed, Catholic, Breth- 
ren in Christ and Mennonites. There- 
fore we are glad to announce that the 
doors of our College are open to every 
denomination. Come ! We shall en- 
deavor to make you feel at home. 



Final Examination. 

The final examination of the Senior 
class in the pedagogical department was 
held on June 11 by the members of the 
taculty. The examination was oral, and 
the questions were based on the thesis 
written by each member of the class. 
S. B. Kiefer's thesis was entitled "The 
Evolution of the American PublicSchool." 
M. Alverda Stayer wrote a thesis on "Ed- 
ucation Through Self-activity." 

Each member of the faculty in turn 
asked questions oti pedagogy and kindred 
subjects. In addition to these, questions 
of a general nature in regard to the edu- 
cational values of the curriculum, and 
individual benefits derived from the 
course of study concluded the examina- 
tion. 

Hereafter it is expected that a com- 
mittee consisting of several County Super- 
intendents in whose county the graduates 
expect to teach will conduct this final 
examination. In this way, the qualifi- 
cations of our graduates will become 
known sufficiently to exempt them from 
taking an(jther examination for provis- 
ional certificates. The pedagogical diplo- 
ma will then be essentially as valuable as 
the State Normal diploma. 

Both members of the class acquitted 
theniselves creditably and manifested a 
commendable degree of intellectual power 
and scholarship. u. c. r. 



lO 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES. 



An Excellent Paper. 

The iJoard of Trustees of Eliza>)ethtown 
College, at their recent meetinf?, passed a 
paper which is highly commendable and 
worthy of study. It is a strong stand, and 
it will be welcomed by the sturdy, sub- 
stantial citizenship of the country. It 
will be especially welcomed by those who 
are interested in the progress of true, 
christian education, and the plain, simple, 
yet glorious doctrines of the ^ew Testa- 
ment. 

We are informed that the paper was 
passed unanimously, and is as follows : 

Elizabeth town College, 
Elizabeth town. Pa., June 16, 1904. 

Be it resolved by the Board of Trustees 
of the Elizabethtown College: 

1. That the modern match games of 
base-ball, foot-ball, etc. with outside 
teams are not in accord with Christian 
virtue and true education. 

2. That we favor physical education 
in every true aspect. 

3. That we especially commend J. M. 
Miller, Mgr., and J. Z. Herr, Capt., and 
all others assisting in their having "called 
off" a match game which had been 
arranged for. 

4. That we are pleased with the spirit 
of conciliation shown by our town boys. 

5. That we gladly reiterate our pur- 
pose to have Elizabethtown College excel 
in moral virtue. 

6. That we cordially invite parents 
and all friends of Christian education to 
assist in the reformation of College life 
along these lines as headed already by 
leading educators of the day. 

7. That this paper shall be published 
in the "Elizabethtown Chronicle" and 
in "Our College Times." 

Jesse Ziegler, Pres. of Board. 



Strong Language. 

Dr. Charles W. Eliot, President of 
Harvard University, gives the following 
strong language on the modern mat<;h 
game of college life : "The breaking up 



of College work for the individual student 
by fre(|uent absence to play games at a 
distance from Cambridge is an evil which 
ought to be checked. 

"It is a greater evil than formerly, 
now that intercollegiate games take place 
all the year round. 



School Re-opens. 

On Monday, September 5, students 
will be admitted and classified. Same 
day a complete organization of classes 
may virtually be effected ready for work. 
On the next morning. Tuesday, there is 
expected to be an educational meeting. 
A special address will mark the occasion, 
followed by appropriate addresses. A 
special program will be issued in due 
time. Such a meeting will give the 
session a good start. Inspiration and 
wise direction at the opening may prove 
very beneficial throughout the session. 
Reader, we want you to attend this 
meeting. Regular class work will follow 
iuimediately. Students, you will enjoy 
the meeting, so will your friends. Do 
not miss it. 



Good Work. 

Mr. Ober Morning and Misses Mary 
Hess and Lydia Buck waiter did some 
teaching along with their studies during 
the spring term, which was well received. 
Miss Sue Buckwalter in addition to her 
class work, rendered good service as din- 
ing room waitress. It is expected that 
she will return to school in the fall and 
her sister Miss Lvdia as well. 



Returning to School. 

Evening following Commencement, 
gentlemen George H. Light, J. G. and S. 
G. Meyer spent at Samuel R. Mc- 
Dannel's. They reported a happy visit. 
Why not? Mr. McDannel's home is one 
of the ideal sort. J. G. and Geo. H. ex- 
pect to return in September. Welcome, 
bovs! 



CONTRACTOR and BUILDER 

COAL, FEED, GRAIN, 
LUMBER and STONE 



Elizabethtown, 



Pa. 



(\: R- LEICHT 

BUILDER OP 

FI/NE VEHICLES 

REPAIR WORK A SPECIALTY 

Elizabethtown, - - Pa. 




U. COBLE 

MARBLE AND 
GRANITE 




AND 

(^MErERYV/ORK 

>- OF 

'Ij. EVERY DESCftlPnOJ 
"^, HATE RIAL 
'♦ AWP WORKMANSHIP 
4»_ GUARANTEED 
I 



Steps, 



SillSs 
Paving Stone 



Call or write for prices. 
ELIZABETHTHTOWN. - PA. 

Near Centre Square. 



All the New^s in the 
ELIZABETHTOWN CHRONICLE 

ONLY THE BEST JOB PRINTING. 



J. C. HEIN'S 

Shaving ais^ Haircutting 

PARLOR 
S. Market St. Elizabethtown, Pa. 

D, B. eoeRSOLe 

Call to see our full line of 

GROCERIES and PROVISIONS 

Famous Chick Feed For Sale. 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

HAKRY MILLER 

CABINET MAKER AND UNDERTAKER 
FULL LINE OF FURNITURE 

S. Market St. Elizabethtown, Pa. 



ISAAG R. peRR 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

Lancaster Office, 33 North Duke Street. 



GEO. A. FISHER 

Hardware, Typewriters 
and Sporting Goods 

We furnish College students and others with 
Typewriters and Athletic goods. Write for prices 

ELIZABETHTOWN:, PA. 

DR. AR-/^STRONG 
DE2SrTI3T 

Crown and Bridge Work a Specialty 

West High Street, Elizahethtown, Pa. 



6 Per Cent. Guaranteed 

without tax, by the 

STATE CAPITAL SAVINGS AND LOAN ASS'N 

H. H. ST ERN 
ELIZABETHTOWN, - - PA 



Dps. Blough and Overficld 

PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

E. H'Sb Street. ElizabethtoWQ, Pa. 




A. BUCK'S SONS CO. 

Manufacturers of the Famous 

EAGLE LAWN SWING 

LAND ROLLERS, CORN SHELLERS, WHEEL BARROWS, &C. 



We know yon want one of 
these swings. Write for prices 



Our Foundry department 
supplies every description ot 

Troughs, 

C a St i n gs, Etc . -^s^**— . ,.. ....... ->v- ... 

Call and see us or write and we will give desired information. 

Both Phones. El iza bethtowH, Pa. 




ANCHOR SPRING W^AGON W^ORKS 




H. H. NISSLEY, Prop. Manufacturers of 

BUSINESS WAGONS AND DEALERS IN PLEASURE VEHICLES OE MODERN DESIGNS 

W. HIGH STREET, ELIZABETHTOWN. PA. 



GEO. KERSEY 

DENTIST 

£. High St., near Oeutei Square) Elizabethtown. 



SINGER i BRANDT 

LUMBER YARD 

W. High St.. 
Telephone. Elizabethtowo, Pa. 



STUDENTS and PROFESSORS 

as well as other people will be made to feel at home wben they come to our store, 

J. H. ^OLWEILER, the leading Clothier and Men's Furnisher. 
Agent for Lebanon Steam Laundry. ELiZABETHTOWN, PA. 



A STORE 



AVith Big Sales, and Small 
Profits for a Principle, and with 
assurance of Best. Service, is 
Bringing Satisfaction and Suc- 
cess. Let me have your mail 
orders for Bibles, Red Letter Tes- 
taments and Sunday School sup- 
plies. Hii^tory of the Brethren 
church ; cloth, !S»1.00, morocco 
$1.50. 

G. N. FALKENSTEIN, 

Books, Stationery and School Supplies, 
Elizabethtown, Pa. 



'11 



Coal 

Grain 

Flour 

Feed 

Paving Stone 

Building Stone 

Ballast^ Lime and 

Farm Implements 

Telephone. RhCCmS, Pa. 



JACOB FISHER 

Watchmaker g Jeweler 

spectacles and Eyeglasses 
FITTED. 



Centre Square. 



Elizabethtown, Pa. 



We 
Invite You 

To come and inspect our 
lines suited to your personal 
wanta. 

Dry Goods, Staple and 
Fancy Notions, Clothing, 
Shoes, Etc. 

PLAIN CLOTHING 

a specialty. 

HERTZLER BROS & GO. 



CENTRE SQUARE, 



Elizabethtown^ 



Pa. 



J. DYER, President. 



W. S. SMITH, Vice Pres. H. C. LEWIS, Cashier. 



n ^^ational ^anl^ 



General accounts solicited. Interest paid 
on Special Deposits. Safe Deposit Boxes in 
Steel, Burglar Proof Vault, for rent. 



J. DYER, 

B. G. GROFF, 

W. S. SMITH, 



DIRECTORS 
E. C. GINDER, 
PETER N. RUTT, 
EM'L DEMMY, 



J. S. RISSER, 
AMOS G. COBLE, 
E. E. COBLE. 



J. IsJl- KXJHlsr. Jr. 
CHOICE BREAD A/ND CAKES 

Weddings and Parties Supplied witi) fancy CaKcs at Sljort Notice. 
S. 1/[AK.K:E3T ST.. HJLIZABETHTOWlSr, FA. 



GEISE & McBRIDE 



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Page Wire Fence a Specialty. 

FARM IMPLEMENTS OF ALL KINDS 

Agents for Foos Gasoline Engines and 
Universal Plows. 

HLIZABBTHTOWN. - - - - PA. 

BALMER'S BAKERY 



Choice Bread 

Rolls and Cakes 

OF ALL KINDS 

S. MARKET STREET, ELIZABETHTOWN. 



The 
A. Dissinger 

Store 

General 

Merchandise 

BARGAINS 

EVERY 

WEDNESDAY! SATURDAY 

J. Harry Brubaker, Manager, 

Elizabethtown, - Pa. 



%>» 



Oar College Times 



f^ fe$» 



€U^abet|)toton College, 

CU3sl)etl)tot»n, j&a. 






^ ^ ^ 



SEPTEMBER, 1904. 



CONTENTS 




An Endowment 








5 


On the Wing 


2 


A Pennsylvanian 


5 


Program Literary Society 


5 


A Farmer 


7 


The Board of Trustees 


I 


Editorials . . - . 


4 


Those Funds 


5 


Eiizabethtown College Opens 


6 


The New Chapel 


6 


Elizabethtown Keceipt Book 


8 


The New Student - 


7 


Fourth of July 


3 


To Come Yet 


8 


1 Harvest Meeting 


2 


Visit By Bro. Beahm 


3 


1 Hard to Decide - 


B 


Value of a College Course 


7 


It Brou]t;ht the Answer 


3 


Wedding Bells 


8 


Labor Day at the College 


2 


Whv Educate 


8 


Locals 


5 


Why I Like Elizabethtown 




Lititz Papers 


6 


College 


7 




„^ 




^^ 



NOW 



is the time to place 
your order for a fall Suit 
or Overcoat, A select 
line to cljoose from. 

The best for tb« least 
n)ooey. 

DAVIS, The Tailor, 

Elizabethlown, Pa. 
ISAAC R. HERR, 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

Lancaster Offlee, 33 Horth Dnk* 8tre«t. 



Horst's Restaurant 

All Flavors of 

Ice Cream ^ Soda Water 
Full Line of Confections 

Centre Square, 
ELIZABETHTOWN, - PA. 

E. E. COBLE, 

OPTICIAN AND JEWELER 



Centre Square, 



Ellzabethtown, Pa. 



r). H. x/[ -A. R. T I isr 
Clothing and Gent's Furnishings 

Ceotre Square, Elizabethtowo, Pa, 



Coal 

Gram 

Flour 

Feed 

Paving Stone 

Building Stone 

Ballast; Lime and 

Farm Implements 

PhoneNo.6i2A. RhcemSy Pd» 



Go To 

ENGLE'S STORE 

where, from now on, they will be receiv- 
ing their Fall Goods, consisting of a full 
and up<to<late line of 

Dry Goods; 

Millinery^ 
Notions^ 

Shoes^ 
Gent^s Furnishings^ 

Carpets^ 
Oil Qoth, 

Groceries; Etc* 

Phone No. 616, ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



0m College Cirne^. 

"Wisdom is the Principal Tiling.'''' 



Vol. I. 



, Elizabethtown, Pa., .September, 1904. 



No. 3. 



The Board ot Trustees. 

At the head of our Board of Trustees 
stands the President, Elder Jesse Ziegler, 
of Royersford, Pa. Elder Ziegler is at 
once a man of fine mental grasp and ot 
good business sagacity. He is a minister 
of the Gospel, and as such he is consider- 
ate, well-popsessed, deliberate, didactic 
and logical. As a business man, be is 
conservative, strong and persevering. He 
is capable of great endurance, and his best 
traits are evinced when under pressure. 
In the hour of dire calamity or pressing 
emergency, heroism blossoms forth as the 
rose. Among his strongest traits are 
worthy ot mention, frankness,endurance, 
strength, persistency, and scopeful views. 
He has been the highest man in the Board 
of Trustees from the time of its first or- 
ganization, and there is no intimation or 
likelihood of an early change. We rath- 
er think he is good enough. But heavy 
responsibilities rest upon hie broad 
shoulders in sustaining, fostering, and de- 
veloping Elizabethtown College, which 
has been so favorably launched upon its 
career of great possibilities. 

The next man we find in official rank 
is the quiet, sedate, and kind old gentle- 
man, Joseph H. Rider, of Elizabethtown, 
the Vice President. Many call him 
"Uncle Joe," and he is as important an 
"Uncle Joe" in the Board as"'Unncle Joe" 
Cannon is in, the United States House of 
Representatives. In natural turn of mind 
he is quite reserved, peaceful, sound in 
judgment, discriminate in business. His 
suci«ss as a business man demonstrates 



his ability as a business man He is pres- 
ident of the Exchange Bank of Elizabeth- 
town, Pa. He operates a large hardware 
store and several good farms. He has 
been in the Board from its first organiza- 
tion. He is one of the greatest benefactors 
of the church in the community, and 
along with brother B. G. GrofF, he ranks 
as one of the two leading benefactors of 
the College. He is not only active in the 
distribution of his funds, but he is well 
beloved in, the Board, in fne College, and 
in the entire community. He has found 
his way into the hearts of many people. 
Long live "Uncle Joe!" 

The efficient Secretary of the Board of 
Trustees is found in the personage of S. 
P Engle. Brother Engle is a man of 
easy approach, and yet having firmness 
and decided personal convictions. His 
commercial strength and organizing abili- 
ty are clearly exemplified in the way he 
conducts his mercantile business, which 
he studies and executes in elegant taste 
and fine proportions. He has not been 
in the Board very long; but is already a 
very active man in the service of the Col- 
lege; is always willing to lend a helping 
hand, in administering the business af- 
fairs.. He is assistant superintendent of 
the Elizabethtown Sunday school of the 
Brethren church, and president of the 
borough council. He is growing in cour- 
age, in church work, and general effici- 
ency, and possesses mariv valued traits. 

We come now to delineate the Treasu- 
rer of the Board, who answers to the 
name on the roil call, S. H. HertzIeK He 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES. 



is deep and rsodrceful, reflective and 
philosophic. He is not aggressive nor 
impulsive, but he is sedate, humorous, 
diplomatic, philosophic, intuitive, with 
broad and charitable turn of mind. This 
Trustee stands as one of the chief promo- 
ters and staunchest friends of the College. 
Indeed, some think since he has no child 
of his own living, he might appropriate- 
ly call the College one of his own 
family and j>osterity. Certainly the Col- 
lege is one of the chief cares and objects 
of his home. He is an earnest, force- 
ful minister of the Gospel, in which 
he does much active, efficient service, and 
as such he ranks high as a careful think- 
er, and clear, orthodox expounder of the 
word. He is a merchant partner, and as 
a means of recreation does considerable 
work on his neighboring farm. As a busi- 
ness man, he is cautious, and energetic. 
He is quick in apperception has a keen 
appreciation of wit and public good will. 
As a minister, he is gifted in simplicity, 
clearness, calmness; strong in intuition, 
and decidedly logical. He has been in 
the Board fron) the dawn of its existence 
and there he should remain. 
( To be Continued. ) 



Labor Day at the College. 

From the Elizabethtown Chronicle. 

Tuesday and Wednesday were busy 
days at the college, being observed as 
Labor Day. Friends of the college had 
been previoiisly invited to devote these 
two days to helping to n)ake the drive- 
way and walk around the building, plant 
hitching posts, dig trenches, cook, clean 
house, cut down weeds, etc. 

Thirty men and ten teams commenced 
work on Tuesday morning and with 
plows and scoops labored faithfully re- 
moving the ground and leveling the drive- 
way preparatory to receiving the crushed 
stone. This work was completed on 
Wednesday evening. As stated before 
there were ten teams and men engaged 
in the work, furnished by Messrs. B. G. 
Grofl", S. G. Gray bill and Addison Buch, 



Mr. GrofT furnishing most of them. Be- 
sides a number of members of the church 
and friends engaged in other work around 
the premises. The ladies connected with 
the church were equally as industrious 
as the men, and were engaged in clean- 
ing house, cooking and other housework. 

Eighty-seven men, women and children 
on Tuesday and as many on Wednesday 
partook of an excellent dinner furnished 
by the good people of Elizab.ethtown, of 
whom Mrs. Joseph Rider had been ap- 
pointed leader. That the meal was highly 
appreciated was evident from the ample 
justice done to it by all. 

The driveway when completed will be 
one of the finest in this section, and will 
be as handsome and attractive as it is 
useful ; in fact the entire premises has a 
decidedly inviting appearance. 

All connected with the college an. I 
church are profuse in their thanks ffir 
the kindness and assistance of their 
friends. 

Harvest Meeting. 
The Harvest Meeting at Graybill's, on 
August 13th, was largely attended and 
good interest prevailed. A nice collection 
was taken up in behalf of the Brooklyn 
Mission Meeting House. A goodly num- 
ber of ministers were present. Trustee 
iS. H. Hertzler gave the main sermon. 
Other Brethren who officiated in the 
monstration of the word are, Isaac 
Keller, H. E. Light, Cyrus Gibble. I. N. 
H. Beahm, John Myer. 



On The Wing. 

The Editor made several fiying trips to 
various sections of our field of patronage, 
such as Cumberland, Somerset, Lebanon, 
and Bedford counties. Pa., and Garrett 
County, Md., also varions parts of Lan- 
caster County. He met with the Brethren 
in worship and labored with them at 
Maple Glen, Springs, Woodbury, Hunts- 
dale, Everett, Ephrata, Graybill's, Myers- 
town, Lititz, etc. He reports a very 
kind and hospitable reception every- 
where. 



OUR COIvLEGE TIMES. 



It Brought the Answer. 

From the Elizabethtowii Chronicle. 

Labor Day at the College Tuesday was 
a success in doors and out. 

Mrs. Joseph H. Rider and Dr. Reber 
were the leading spirits in the building. 
They had much and splendid help. The 
dinner was ample and delicious. Ah! 
These Pjlizabethtowners know how to 
cook and to clean. Would that such 
were true of all women. Many things 
have been set iu order and the College is 
beautifully clean from top to bottom. 

On the campus, B. G. Groflf was the 
central figure and leading spirit. Addison 
Buch proved himself an able lieutenant.- 
These two men know to see "eye to eye" 
Prof. Ober was the engineer, and by the 
way, the Professor can handle men 
pretty well, as well as the compass and 
shovel. Joseph G. Heisey is "A no 1" 
on planting hitching posts, which job he 
had charge of. 

From Mastersonville, came Elder Zug 
and wife and M. G. Gibble. At this time 
space forbids personal inenti<in of the 
many other staunch friends and good 
workers that were present from town and 
country of both men and women. 

If the water pipes had been on hand, 
the ditching would have been worked at 
also at the time. But as Mr. Groff had 
the road around the College and the 
yard grading in view, for some time, he 
just pressed that feature right on. He'll 
push the pipe laying, too! 

This noble effort has proven a great 
blessing in way of the labor, and of senti- 
ment formint;. Work tells! So does 
sentiment! A vote of thanks to each 
helper. A Shoveler. 



Fourth of July. 

Three of our faculty, Professors Ober, 
Myer and Beahm, and three of the Trust- 
ees, Brethren Ziegler, Hertzler arid 
Wenger, attended the Sunday schoQl and 
Missionary Meetings at Ephrata on July 
4th. The occasion was in every particular 
pronoiinced a success. The work at Eph- 



rata is in good hands, and the Brethren 
are pushing the cause with an effort con- 
sistent with the obligations resting up- 
on them. The idea of having such ser- 
vices on this national holiday has a spec- 
ial tendency to detract the mind from the 
hilarity of the day, to more weighty mat- 
ters and to honor God more consistently, 
for establishing in this country, "the 
powers that be." When the Declaration 
of Independence was made in 1776, the 
representatives in Congress assembled in 
Philadelphia, were burdened with a great 
duty. They performed it sacredly and 
fearlessly. On that day statesmen wept 
and prayed. Why should not the true 
citizen of our day reproduce the solemnity 
of that glorious work, rather than the 
noisy, harmful, hilarity of modern- times? 
It is befitting that the Church should 
lead in a reform of this character. The 
idea is a good one. Their effort proved a 
success. May their example be emulated- 
by others in the future. 

A Visit by Bro. Beahm. 

Prof. Beahm of Elizabethtown College, 
spent several days with us at Woodbury, 
arriving here July iO, and performing the 
marriage ceremony which uniteil M. Al- 
verda Stayer of tliis place and Frank W. 
Groff' of Elizabethtown. 

Thursday and Friday he spent with us 
visiting and canvassing. We are pleased 
with the success and hope for still greater 
in the future. 

On Thursday Prof. Beahm preached to 
us on the subject of Church Government 
and Farming. His sermon was listened 
to by an attentive audience and the 
words spoken greatly appreciated. 

He left for Everett Saturday noon, 
where he preached the Harvest sermon 
on Sunday, leaving for home on Monday. 
Prof. Beahm is a veVy good preacher and 
canvasser. Look out for him. Cnme 
again, Bro. Beahm. J. H. Stayer. 



Vacation goes. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES. 



€)ur College %imt6. 

EDITORIAL STAFF. 

EDITOR IN chief: 

I. N. H. BEAHM. 

ASSOCIATE editors: 

D. C. REBER, I. E. SHOOP, ELIZABETH MEYER 

SPECIAL editors : 

Local Editor, - - - MRS. F. W. GROFF 
Society Editor. - SAMUEL S. SUMPMAN 

business management : 
Managing Editor and Business Manager, 

H. K. OBER 
associates : 

J. M. MILLER, I. E. OBERHOLTZER 

Our College Times is published bi-monthly. 
Subscription price (six numbers) 25 cents, single 
copy 6 cents. 

Pack your trunk. 



September 5th is nearly here. 



Be sure to be on hand on the opening 
day, September 5th. To begin well is a 
good motto. 



The Educational Meeting in two ses- 
sions is expected to Le full of interest. 
Don't miss it. 



Send some spicy words for O. C. T. 
Let us hear from the field often. We 
want to know how you are getting along. 
Send your best and do it quick. 



On Friday, August 5th, the Trustees 
had a meeting at the College. Consider- 
able business came before the body, and 
was disposed of with fair satisfaction. 



Letters coming in from the field 
from old students and from new 
ones, indicate the anxiety of being on 
College Hill again, and the teachers are 
growing anxious for the school opening. 
The prospects are encouraging, and we 
trust we shall all be busy and happy 
when the College doors spring open again 
in September. 



Dr. Reber's excellent article on "Im- 
planting Ideals" should have ajipeared in 
this issue. 



How do you like Our College Times? 
You have had an opportunity to read, to 
consider, and to decide. Send in your 
subscription. It is only twenty-five (25) 
cents a year. 



J. Z. Herr of Myerstown, student of 
last session, did not expect to return; but 
the attractions at Elizabethtown College 
are too strong for him to turn down, so 
Jacob will be with us next year the whole 
session. We see where you are right, 
Brother. May many others follow your 
example. You are coming for a hard 
year's work. You mean business. Here's 
to your success. 



Elder Ziegler made a purchase of a 
piano and an organ of the Weaver Organ 
& Piano Co., of Lancaster. The instru- 
ments have already been placed in the 
College, and Sister Good, the new music 
teacher, is expected to be on hand some 
days before the session opens. She 
coHies reccommended as having musical 
attainments, and of being a good Chris- 
tian worker. 



Dr. D. C. Reber and Prof. H. K. Ober, 
members of the Elizal)ethtown College, 
were guests of J. H. Keller for several 
days this and last week. Prof. Ober 
lectured in the Brethren church near 
New Freedom Saturday evening and Dr. 
Reber preached two sermons Sunday. 
They were greeted by very appreciative 
and attentive audiences. The lecture 
was like sparkling drops of dew in a 
morning sun, abounding in good advice 
delivered in a very pleasant way. The 
sermons were expositions of the teach- 
ings of Christ logically portrayed. We 
say come again. — "Glen Rock Item" of 
July 29, 1904. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES. 



LOCALS. 



MRS. F. W. G. 



Samuel B. Kiptfer, 1904, has moved to 
IJtitz, where he is employed as teacher 
in the High School. 

Miss Luella h'ogelsanger, '03, writes 
that she is delighted to think that she 
will soon again be one of the number on 
College Hill. 

Charles Shoop, a student of last term, 
was a pleasant caller in Elizabethtown, 
August 20th. 

Miss Elizabeth Myer made a short call 
at the College August 16th. 

Harry Lehman, 'y4, is enjoying his 
work as stenographer employed at the 
Anchor Spring Wagon Works, Elizabeth- 
town. 

Miss Bessie M. Rider, '03, visited Miss 
Myer at Bareville, over Sunday, August 
7th. 

John H. Stayer, ot Woodbury, expects 
to again enroll as a student at the College 
this fall. He reports that there are others 
from the same community coming also. 

Elizabeth Zortman, '05, after spending 
a pleasant vacation, is readv for the o- 
pening of the new school year. 

Henry K. Garman, '04, has accepted 
the position in Woodbury, N. J., which 
was vacated by Miss P'ogelsanger, '04.^ 

Mary B. Hess will again resume her 
work at the College at ihe opening of 
the Fall term. 



An Endowment. 

Some people are asking why the pro- 
moters of Elizabethtown College do not 
work more toward establishing endow- 
ment funds. This feature of our Institu- 
tion will receive attention in due time. 
There are many other things that have 
been done, and are being done ; and the 
Trustees, beyond a doubt, are weighing 
the matter of endowment work already. 
Let us hope that the work will receive 
new effort as the opportunity may come. 



A Pennsylvanian. 

Prof. Davis of Somerset county, is Of 
Pennsylvania German parentage and can 
speak the dialect fluently. When he 
comes to Lancaster county, as teacher, 
he will have an opportunity to use his 
mother tongue to advantage. He does not, 
however, come to teach German. Our 
President visited him during vacation and 
reports a verv favorable impression. 
Prof. Davis has a very pleasant and 
unassuming manner. He is adjudged to 
be a man to bear acquaintance well, and 
will combine mildness, firmness, and 
vigor quite nicely for the school room. 



Program Keystone Literary Snciety. 

Executive Session, Sept. 9, 1904. 
Music. Declamation, Mr. Stayer. 

Parliamentary Drill. 

Impromptu Debate. AflBrmative — J. G. 
Meyer. Miss Lehman. Negative — J,^. 
Miller, Miss Hoffman. ' 

Music. 

Recitation — Miss Sue Buckwalter. 
Question Box. Music. 

J. G. Myers, Pres't. 



Those Fund. 



You remember, doubtless, on Com- 
mencement day at the College, there was 
a collection lifted under the management 
of Elder T. F. Imler. That collection 
exceeded one hundred dollars. It was 
stated that day that the money would be 
used about the oftice and other public 
rooms of the building. The monej' has 
all been (;arefully invested, and the re- 
sults are visible any day and every day. 
Those funds which were so graciously 
given on that day have surely subserved 
a noble purpose and furnished us a num- 
ber of much needed improvements. 
These improvements add both to the ap- 
pearance and convenience of our work. 
The management is still yery grateful for 
that day's generosity. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES. 



Elizabethtown College Opens. 

TWO PrBLIC MEETINGS. 

The fifth annual session of Elizabeth- 
town College will open September 5 and 
6, Monday and Tuesday. 

Enrolling of students, old ones and new 
ones, examination of new ones, and class- 
ification of all, will proceed miscellane- 
ously and informally durintr Monday, 

Program tor Monday evening, seven 
o'clock. 

Devotional S. H. Hertzler. 

Application in School Duty, (ten min.) 

I. E. Shoop. 
The Trials and Difficulties of Student 

Life, (15 min.) . .Prof. Elizabeth Myer. 

Value of Scholarship, (10 min.) 

Prof. W. H. Sanger. 

Hymn. 

What Measures the Value of Education? 

(15 min.) Prof. H. K. Ober. 

Value of Music in Character Forming, 

(10 min.) Prof. Flora Herring Good. 

Music. 

Chief Address Snpt. A. J. Wickey. 

Music. 

Chairman Dr. D. C. Reber. 

Ushers — Jacob Myer, J. M. Miller, Geo. 
Light, Nathan Martin. 

PROG HAM, TUESDAY 9:00 A. .M. 

Hymn Audience. 

Devotional, Elder E. M. Wenger. 

Hymn Audience 

Let Us Do Our Best, ( 10 min. ) 

Luella Fogelsanger. 

Necessity and Value of Promptness, (10 

min. ) Prof. P. S. Davis. 

Value of Aim, (15 min.) Dr. D. C. Reber. 
Some of Our Problems, (10 min. ) L N. H. 

Beahm. 
Looking Back — Chief address, ... Elder 

J. A. Long. 
Music. 

Announcements, 
Class Work Begins. All classes recite 

Tuesday. 

Chairman Prof. H. K. Ober. 

Ushers— J. Z. Herr, D. L. Landis, Walt- 
er Gish, James H. Breitigan. 



Lititz Papers. 

The editor called on Mr. John Z. Zook 
while in Lititz and also on Mr. J. F. 
Buch. Mr. Zook is editor of the "Lititz 
Express." Mr. Buch is editor of "The 
Lititz Record." These gentlemen are 
very genial and kind. They will send 
their papers to our reading room, where 
they will always l)e on hand and may be 
read by many of our friends and students 
who are already readers of these papers. 
They have also opened their columns to 
news items from the College. 

For the generosity that they have ex- 
tended toward Elizabethtown College, 
' Our College Times" hereby extends to 
them a vote of thanks, with the hope 
that they may at no distant day visit our 
institution and see for themselves the 
many advantages we have to oflTer. 



The New Chapel. 

Just when this new building will come 
will depend very largely upon the efl'orts 
of those directly interested in fostering 
the growth of the College. It is hoped 
that everybody will help to make the 
approaching session so interesting and 
profitable that this needed addition will 
be forthcoming. We must not only agi- 
tate the question of this building, but we 
must work hard to make the buiding of 
it an imperative necessity. The demand 
must not only be on the end of the 
tongue, but it must come, backed by the 
stern hand of necessity. Now reader, 
what will you do towards bringing this 
event to pass? We want the new chapel! 
Talk it up, and work the school up, then 
the chapel will come up. 



During vacation. Prof. Sanger has been 
doing home mission work in a West 
Virginia field. 



The address by Elder J. A. Ivong, 
Tuesday A. M. September 6, will be the 
chief feature of the occasion. Be sure to 
hear Brother Long. 



OUR COIvIvEGE TIMES. 



The Value of a College Course. 

BY OBER MORNING. 

By means of a college course a young 
man is enabled to discover what his 
powers are, and to use them for his own 
good and the good of others. He de- 
velops thought power, and his aims are 
higher — higher than mere money-gettingi 
or so-called success. He obtains a larger 
and finer standard with which to test the 
questions of life, personal, political, social 
and ethical — which will come to him 
for discussion. His character is enlarged 
and enriched. He becomes far more 
than an average man in intellectual sym- 
pathies, in mental horizon, and in practi- 
cal effectiveness, and if he do his work 
faithfully he will possess a better dis- 
ciplined mind for whatever work of life 
he may turn his attention to, whether 
artisan, farmer, physician, lawyer or 
minister. The advance of world know- 
ledge is so widespread that, in order to 
hold one's own to be the best and to do 
the best, it is necesfarv to <r(>t just as 
much education as possible. 

To conclude : The young man of aver- 
age ability should take a college course, 
(1) To add to the proper and legitimate 
enjoyment of life. (2) To develop his or 
her powers. (3) To make him or her 
more useful in life. 



Why I Like Elizabethtewn CoMege. 

Because of the excellent opportunities 
afforded, and the thoroughness in class- 
room work. It is situated at a very 
healthful location, and is surrounded by 
many beautiful landscapes. It seems 
home-like. 

I would urge all who wish to go to 
school, to attend this College, because of 
the kindness and faithfulness of the 
instructors. All students attending this 
school can feel rewarded for the time 
they'spend. I certainly can say I receiv- 
ed excellent instruction. 

Effie L. Shank. 



A Farmer. 

Fredericksburg, I'a., June 25, '04. 

Dear Fellow Students — By request I 
shall write several lines to let you know 
that we had a very pleasant trip going 
hfmie. 

We are now back on the farm for over 
a week. Those of you who resorted to a 
similar occupation no doubt also noticed 
quite a contrast. Plenty of exercise and 
a large appetite but no mental strain. 

The farm, the source of human susten- 
ance, is certainly a place from which 
health and vigor flow. 

In conclusion, will say let us all re- 
member E'town College, and by our aid 
it may some day be a distinguished 
monument of intellectual training and 
moral and spiritual advancement. 
Remember me as your respectful friend, 
J. G. Meyer. 

[This good letter came two days after 
going to press with the July number. 
Gladly publish it in this issue. — Ed.] 



The New Student. 

What are we going to do with him up- 
on his arrival? W ill we, as former stu- 
dents, returned fmm our pleasant vaca- 
ti<^ins, forget that others claim part of our 
attention, or will we welcome the new 
stuilent with a pleasant smile, and a 
hearty hand-shake, and thus make him 
feel that we appreciate his presence? May 
the latter be the case. 

Do we remember those first few days 
that we spent at college? How lonely we 
sometimes felt! If we do, we will surely 
try to make it as pleasant and as home- 
like for the new student as possible. Re- 
member, the first few days count in mak- 
ing an impression. r. e. s. 



President Roosevelt and Judge Parker 
have made their speeches of acceptation, 
but it is more important to you just now 
to accept the splendid oppotunities Eliza- 
bethtown College offers to aspiring young 
men and women. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES. 



Weddtng Bells. 

A j»n!tty lioiiic weddiiij; took plac*» at 
Woodbury, Bedford county, Pa., on July 
20, when MirtP Mary A. Slayer and Mr. 
Frank \V. Groff were united in the holy 
bonds of wedlock. 

The knot was tied beautifully, and. we 
trust securely, by our worthy f)resident, 
Prof. I. N. H. Beahm. 

Miss Ruth Stayer, sister of the bride, 
was bridesmaid, an(l her tirother, Mr. 
Maurice Stayer was groomsman. 

After the ceremony the guests were 
entertained at supper, beautifully arranged 
and well furnished with delicacies lo 
supply the wants of the inner man. 

The guests present from Elizabethtown 
were, Mr. and Mrs. B. G. (Troff, Mr. and 
Mrs. S. G. Graybill, Mr. and Mrs. S. P. 
Engle and Miss Elizabeth Myer. 

The oldest guest present was Mrs. 
Cameron, grandmother of the bride, and 
the youngest, her nephew, Marvin Ka- 
garise. 

Ms. and Mrs. Groff left on Friday morn- 
ing on a trip to the West, and shortly 
after their return took up their abode 
in Elizabethtown. E. M. 



Hard to Decide. 

It seems a little hard to decide what 
the real issue of the day between the two 
great national political parties in the U- 
nited States is. It may be of some interest 
what will be made the supreme issue of 
the campaign before election day. But 
young friend, it is of more importance to 
you to decide the true issue of your life. 
VV hat are yoxi going to make the living 
issue of your future ? What is the burn- 
ing question of your soul ? What will 
call forth your life work ? The s|)lendid 
dash and courage of Roosevelt may be 
admirable. The self-possessed and dis- 
cerning spirit of a Parker may be capti- 
vating. But that you should mark out 
your future career clearly and decidedly 
and press your claims as you pass through 
Jife, i.s the paramount issue in your cam- 



paijrn of duty. Prepare yourself for the 
great struggle. Do your best, and you 
will live in the White House of peace, of 
])lenty, and of power. Come to Eliza- 
bethtown Collejre for further prejiaration. 



Why Educate. 

Educate for strength. Educate for per- 
sonal power. Educate for personal ac- 
complishment and jjersonal worth. Then, 
whatever one may turn his hand to, he 
will have many additional chances for 
success. Placing a commercial value on 
education is a mistake. Money is essen- 
tial, it is true ; but in the object of edu- 
cation, to educate for money is simply to 
put a commercial value upon education. 
Educate to have a well furnished mind 
and the highest and best rounded out 
character ; and a hundred chances to 
one, all the subordinate features of life 
will be added. To have a right kind of 
life, that of power is fundamental, even 
in the Gospel. Our Lord said, "Seek 
first the Kingdom of God and His Right- 
eousness and all these things shall be 
added unto you." The public mind 
should wake up as to the true object of 
etlucation. Elizabethtown College is in 
line to assist in this great work. 



Elizabethtown Receipt Book. 

A book of favorite recipes, contributed 
by Elizabethtown housekeepers, has been 
compiled and will be presented to the 
public in the near future. Proceeds will 
be applied to a charitable cause. 

Mks. I. H. Staiffer, Chairman, 



To Come Yet. 



During vacation ISIiss Good, our music 
teacher, sent a very excellent article on 
music, to be published in this issue, 
l-nfortunately, the manuscript was mis- 
lad, and we shall wait with pleasure her 
reproduction of the article. Look for 
it in the next issue. 




WEAVEr*"' 



Pianos 



EASY TO OPERATE 
HARD TO WEAR OUT 

Write for Catalogues and Prices to the 

LANCASTER AVAREROOMS, 

SSS E3A.ST KZIlSra ST. 

WEAVER ORGAN & PIANO CO. 



Bibles 

and 

Testaments 


Sheet Music 

and 
Hymn Books 




at 


THE 


BOOK STORE 


G. 

Mai 


N. Falkenstein 
Elizabethtown, 
Pa. 
Orders Solicited 


History of 
The Brethren 


Sunday 
School Supplies 



GEO. D. BOGGS 

DEALER IN 

STOVES, RANGES. 
HOUSEFURIVISHIXG GOODS, 

and a full line nf 

HARDW^ARE 

Call to see ns, we will supply your wants 
S. Market St. Elizabethtown, Pa. 

J. G. STAUFFER 

MANUFACTURER AND DEALER IN 

Flour, peed. Grain. Salt. 

Lumber oQd Wood. 

Telegraph Poles a Specialty 



Local and Long Distance Phone. 



Elizabethtown. 



Pa. 



H* S* Hottenstein 

GABINET-JVJAKER 

AND UNDERTAKER 

A full line of FURNITURE always on 
hand. Call to see me. My lines will 
please you. Undertaking carefully at- 
tended to. 

Elizabethtown, Pa. 

Hornafius* Cafe 

OYSTERS in every style 
ICE CREAM, 

SODA WATER 

Fine line of Confections always on hand 

MEALS AT ALL HOURS 



GI5E Z McSRIDE 
































> 


























; 


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J 


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g 


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— 




■ 


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• 


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rz 


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— " 




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- 



Page Wire Fence a Specialty. 

FAR^lkd nSwffF'ILjHSlwdiKNTS 

\(;ents fur 

New Holland Gasoline Engines, Universal 

Plows. Grain Drills, Owego Wagons, etc. 

Elizabethtown, Pa. 



J .TVC . KZXJPaiN, Jr. 
e-HOICE B-READ A/ND CAKES 

Weddings and Parties Supplied witf) fancy Cakes at Short Notice. 
S. Kl A.K,K:ttJT ST.. H:LIZAE3ETHTOV^lSr. FA. 

STUDENTS and PROFESSORS 

as well as other people will be made to feel at iioine when they come to our store. 

J. N. OLWEILER, the leading Clothier and Men's Furnisher, 
Agent for Lebanon Steam Laundry. ELIZABETHTOWM, PA. 

All the News in the 
ELIZABETHTOWN CHRONICLE 

ONLY THE BEST JOB PRINTING. 



JACOB FISHER 

Watchmaker i Jeweler 

spectacles and Eyeglasses 
Fitted 

Centre Square, Elizabethtown, Pa. 



^0 



CONTRACTOR and BUILDER 

COAL, FEED, GRAIN, 
LUMBER and STONE 



BALIVIER'S BAKERY 

Choice Bread 

Rolls and Cakes 

OF ALL Kl^iDS. 

8. MARKET ST., ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



Elizabethtown. 



Pa. 



HARRY MILLER 
CABINET MAKER AND UNDERTAKER 

FULL LINE OF FURNITURE 



S. Market St., 



Elizabethtown, Pa. 



A. W. Martin 

COAL, WOOD, GRAIN, 
FLOUR and FEED 

Telephone 

Elizabethtown^ - Pa. 

.1. C. HEIN'S 

Shaving Haircutting 

F" A. K, Li O K- 
S. narket St. Elizabethtown, Pa. 



JACOB D. RIDER 

Printing, Designing, 

Engraving, and 

Steel Die Stamping 



20 N. Queen Street, LANCASTER, PA. f 



Both Phones. 



^ 'WWWV^' ^wwwww%*www^W ^F^r^r^r^^F^r^r^r 



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ANCHOR SPRING W^AGON WORKS. 




H. H. NISSLEY, Prop. Manufacturers of 

BUSINESS WAGONS AND DEALERS IN PLEASURE VEHICLES OF MODERN DESIGNS 

W. HIGH STREET. ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



A. BUCK'S SONS CO. 



Manufacturers of the Famous 

EAGLE LAWN SWING 

You want one of these home " beantifiers." 
Write for prices and catalogue. 

LAND ROLLERS, WHEEL- 
BARROWS, STEEL AND CAST 

InuN I nOUuHo, and a full line up-to-date foundry articles 
Corn Shellers* 




There is no better sheller 

made than our 



NO. 3 

ONE-HOPPER, RIGHT HAND SHELLER, 

with cob separator and sieve, as 

shown in the accompanying cut. 

Weight 125 pounds. 



NO. 7 



A TWO-HOPPER LEFT HAND SHELLER 

furnished with atljn8tal)le shaker. 

For hand or power use. 

Weight 280 lbs. 





Both Phones 



We manufacture the 

Wooden Stave 

and 

Steel Face 

LAND ROLLER 

|•^!^^^r:•.'/<'.^'t.-j,.^.H Thev are built like all our 
jjoods are, for service. 

Elizabethtown, Pa. 



^ TIT TI7 1 TlTimTTmnTiriT TnriiTT I ITflTl Tl I ITTr w 






Surplus and Profits $25,000.00 
Capital - - $50,000.00 



<^ 



* Transacts a general banking businesss. S 

G Issues interest bearing Certificates of Deposit. ff 



O F F I e E K s. 



^ Jot. H. Rider, President. J. H. Eshelman, Cashier ^ 

^ A. R. Forney, Vice President. I. H. Stauffer, Teller. i^ 

I DI-REeTO-RS. I 

^ Joe. H. Rider, Josiah Foltz, Abraham R. Forney, m 

ilk Joa. G. Heieey, Dr. H, K. Blough, Isaac Wealand. «> 

g Henry E. Landia, Alien A. Coble, H. J. Gish. g 

© Amos C. Fridy, Dr. A. M. Kalbaughi. iqk 

WE MOST CORDIALLY INVITE YOU 

To Visit Us In Our Store, 

N. E. CORNER, CENTRE SQUARE, ELIZABETHTDWN 

Your personal wants supplied in the following lines : 

Staple and Fancy Goods, Notions, Men's, 

Women's and Children's Clothing, Boots and 

Shoes, Groceries, Queensware, Etc. 

We Ever Stand I^eady To Meet All H^oorable Competition. 

Soliciting your patronage, we are ever ready to accommodate 

you promptly. 

HERTZLER BROS. & CO. 



« « 

« « 

« « 

J W. S. SMITH, Pres. B. G. GROFF, Vice Pres. H. C. LEWIS, Cashier. J 

« « 

« « 

! Elizabethtown National Bank ! 

« « 

S Geo^i'cil accouots solicited. Interest paid J 

« « 

J OQ Special Deposits. Safe Deposit Boxes in « 

» Steel, Burglar Proof Valt, for rent. « 

» « 

« « 

; DIRECTORS i 

« « 

« ft 

% W. S. SMITH PETER N. RUTT AMOS G. COBLE % 

% B. G. GROFF EM'L DEMMY E. E. COBLE % 

ft ft 

« E. C. GINDER J. S. RISSER B. L. GEYER ^ 

ft ft 

ft ft 

ft ft 

«»«ft«»ftftft»ft»ft*«ftft»««««ftft«tfttftft««««««ft«««ftft«ft»*««««ft«»«»« 
W . W 

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A. Dissinger Store 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

i The Store that is not Pleased unless you are 



,.__ .... ^_.__- ... _.._. ^ 

^ . . _^ _ . , , _ . m 

Who Will Get The Piano? f 



I J. HARRY BRUBAKER I 

^ Proprietor. I 



^^^/ZjL^J-AaJ^ ' U « ^'J^ ' 



Onr College Times 



n^ nM» 



€lt^al)et|)toton College, . 



«4w %!• %:Sw 



NOVEMBER, 1904. 



CONTENTS 









■■■■■ 


At Work •• . - 


3 


HofFer'e Meeting House 


11 


At Mountville 


8 


Implanting Ideals 


5 


A Trip to York County 


8 


Keystone Literary Society 


10 


A Nice Word ... 


9 


Locals 


7 


An Ordination Service 


11 


Local Institute 


12 


A Word of Joy ... 


12 


Meetings in the Chapel 


6 


A Business Letter 


12 


Ministerial Meeting 


11 


"Board of Trustees 


1 


Plants and Flowers 


12 


Children's Meeting 


8 


Petersburg Children's Day 


9 


Club Rates 


11 


Supt. Wickev 


6 


'^lizabethtown College 


6 


Sunday School Meeting 


10 


Editorials .... 


4 


The College Opening 


7 


Fifth Annual Session 


3 


The Bible Term 


9 


Green Tree Church 


9 


The New Chapel 


10 






NOW 



is the time to place 
your order for a fall Suit 
or Overcoat, (\ select 
line to choose from. 

The best for the least 
mooey. 

DAVIS, The Tailor, 

Elizabethfown, Pa. 



ISAAC n. HERR 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

LftDoaster Office, 33 Horth Duke Street 



Horst's Restaurant 

All Flavors of 

Ice Cream Soda Water 
Full Line of Confections 

Centre Square, 
ELIZABETHTOWN, - - PA. 

E. E. COBLE 

OPTIGIArr AND JEWELER 



Centre Square, 



Elizabethtown, Pa. 



ID. H. liJlJi^T^rCXN 

Clothing and Gent's Furnishings 

CeQtre Square, ElizabethtoWQ, Pa. 



Coal 

Grain 

Flour 

Feed 

Paving Stone 

Building Stone 

Ballast^ Lime and 

Farm Implements 

Phone No. ei2A. RheciTis, Pa. 



Go To 

ENGLE'S STORE 

where, from now on, they will be receiy- 
int! their Fall Goods, consisting of a full 
and up-to-date line of 

Dry Goods 

Millinery 
Notions 

Shoes 
Gent^s Furnishings 

Carpets 
Oilcloth 

Groceries^ Etc* 

Phone No. 6 i 6, Elizabethtown, Pa. 



0nx College Cime0. 



"Wisdom is the Principal Thing." 



Vol. I. 



Elizabethtown, Pa., November, 1904. 



No. 



Board of Trustees. 

(Continued fmm September Issue.) 

Elder T. F. Imler of Norristown, Pa , 
is numberod among the Trustees of Eliza- 
bethtown College, and it goes without 
saying that he is not simply a nominal 
member, but that he is also a reality in 
the body. 

Brother Imler has made a very credit- 
able career as a business man and preach- 
er. He is intuitivel) and practically an 
organizer; system reigns ihroughout his 
being. One of the brightest marks of 
his ability is in Lancaster city. Here 
work of the church flourished materially 
and spiritually He resigned his w ork in 
Lancaster and accepted the position of 
business manager in the Brethren Pub- 
lishing House, at Elgin, 111., where he 
rendered excellent service. On leaving 
Elgin he accepted a pastorate in Norris- 
town, where he is vitalizing, organizing, 
and developing the work in a very en- 
couraging manner. 

His work is along the line of the true 
teacher, in that he harnesses the talents 
of others, in that he gets others to 
work. As a minister he is pointed and 
clear, emphatic and practical. He illus- 
trates aptly, and in living pictures. He 
combines in many ways strategy, diplo- 
macy and statesmanship. 

In the Board of Trustees, his judgment 
and advice are considered very valuable. 
He is one of the strongholds of that 
body. At their last election he vvas 
elected for a new term of three years. 



May his shadow never grow less! 

Elder E. M. Wenger, Fredericksburg, 
Pa., is one of the influential members of 
the Board of Trustees. He has served 
efficiently for a number of years, and is 
the right man and in the right place. 
Brother Wenger has been in early years 
a teacher, and has won an enviable local 
reputation. 

The church called him to the ministry 
where he has served with marked success. 
During the past summer he was advanced 
to the full ministry, having been ordained 
to the eldership, or bishopric. He is presi- 
dent of the Fredericksburg cannery, and 
he is State district secretary of the Sun- 
day schools of East Pennsylvania, where 
he is organizing and vitalizing the work; 
so that the Sunday schools of the district 
are being rapidly pushed forward by 
him. And while he has all this work of 
manufacturing canned goods, preaching 
the gospel, and carrying forward the 
Sunday school work, yet he superintends 
his farm successfully. He is very anxious 
to see Elizabethtown College succeed, in 
doing* good and furthering the interest of 
the church, as well as of the individual. 

He unites cordially with the manage- 
ment of the College in that the work of 
the institution should be ideal, unique, 
and useful. His visits are much appre- 
ciated. , 

A. S. Kreider, of Annviile, Fa., i? a 
prime factor in the Board. He turns the 
scale at the highest notch of any of the 
Trustees. Dr. West took his son to the 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES. 



Atlantic ocean, once upon a time, and as 
the boy looked over the deep bine sea. he 
appeared astonished. The doctor said 
that the boy realized that he had soine- 
thin^r "bifr" before him. Snch is the 
case now with the editor, in writing up 
the subject of this brief sketch. 

Brother Kreider is a man who appre- 
ciates the home side of life He has an 
excellent home, an amiable wife.and nine 
brifrht children. He is therefore opposed 
to the "race suicide" idea. He not only 
believes in replenishing the earth but is 
obi\ving the injunction to multiply as 
well. He is a man interested in the wel- 
fare of the chuvch, and erro\\ing in both 
tendency and capacity, manifestly. He 
travels and reads considerably. He is a 
good observer and student of both things 
an<l men. He is brimful of energy and 
activity He is every inch a business 
man, and would succeed well in a num- 
ber of things to which he might well turn 
his efforts, l)ut nature evidently intended 
that he should be a wholesale man in 
whatever channel he might turn his en- 
ergies. He is naturally a manufacturer 
and an organizer; and while he has keen 
discernment, fine judgment of human 
nature, and great business capacity, his 
strongest tendencies are to the commer- 
cial and industrial. 

He was raised a farmer, became a 
farmer and stock and grain dealer, and 
later found himself in the manufacturing 
circle. He began the manufacture of 
shoes at Palmyra where he yet owns a 
busy plant. Still later, and on a 
larger scale, he was turning out shoes in 
great quantity in Annville, Pa., where he 
conducts and operates a large shoe fac- 
tory, employing hundreds of hands. He 
has established a large business in Eliza- 
bethtown. Pa., under the name The 
Kreider Shoe Manufacturing Co., of 
which he is president, and where one of 
the largest shoe factories in the entire 
country is being erected and will soon be 
in full operation. 

Brother Kreider has not been a mem- 
ber of the Board many years, but he is 



taking more and more interest in Eliza- 
bethtown College, and he is certainly ca- 
pable of doing the school great service. 
He takes well to the idea that ourCollege 
should be and ought to be difi'erent from 
much of the Colletre life that is j-xtant in 
the country, and we ])elieve that he will 
continue to prove a very valuable factor in 
the furtherance of the institution. 

By throwing himself into fullest activity 
and sympathy for the college and the 
church, his influence will prove invalu- 
able for the furtherance of the gospel, and 
of true education. His business engage- 
ments forbid his putting as much time to 
the cause as he evidently would like. 
It is hoped that he may be able to devote 
more time, interest, and effort as the 
years roll by. His judgment is sought 
ami his talent is needed. 

Elder Benjamin Hottel of Passer, Pa., 
has served efficiently on the Board for 
several years. He is one of the earnest, 
faithful German ministers of the church. 
He is l)ishop of the congregation where 
'he lives in Bucks countv, and as such he 
proves to be a pastor and shepherd of the 
flock committed to his charge. He is 
faithful in the work and loyal to the 
cause. 

His ministration of the word is almost 
wholly in the German language, and has 
preached a number of times in the College 
chapel to the edification of his hearers. 

He is a farmer, lumberman, and manu- 
facturer as well as a preacher. He is 
noted for a genial, happy disposition, and 
he radiates sunshine wherever he goes. 

It is very much desired that he should 
spend more time at the College among 
the teachers and students. His presence 
i? insjiiring and helpful. His beaming 
face, his genial eye, and his warm hand- 
shake are verv much appreciated at Eliza- 
bethtown, especially at the College. Let 
us have more of his presence and influ- 
ence in our institution. We ought to 
have a number of sermons from him dur- 
ing the current school term. 

He is much interested in the school 
and has its welfare close to his heart, and 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES. 



has capability of doing very excellent 
canvassing for the school wherever he 
goes, and we are frank in saying that we 
believe that he is preaching the gospel of 
true education wherever opportunity is 
presente(i. 

The youngest on the Board of Trustees 
is found in the person of S. G. Grayhill, 
who lives in Elizabethtown, and carries 
on business at Rheems, Pa. Brother 
Graybill is not only the youngest in the 
trusteeship, but he is the youngest man 
on the Board. He is a son-in-law to 
Brother B. G. Groff. He is a young man 
of fine energies, business capacity, and 
organizing ability. He is capable, by ex- 
perience, of being able to handle large 
and heavy business; and he is taking 
hold of the school work with the same 
grip that characterizes his mercantile 
and industrial business. 

He deals in grain and coal, operates a 
milling and stone business and deals in 
farm implements. Incidentally to his in- 
terests in the work at Elizabethtown in 
the church, he has been an active leader 
in the Sunday school at Newville for 
several years. 

Brother Graybill is very much inter- 
ested in the progress of the school and 
especially inclines to help the school 
along on the material side. He is one of 
the active leaders in fixing up the grounds, 
and it is expected through his eff"orts and 
Brother Groff's, that the road around the 
College will soon be piked or macada- 
mized. When this work is done it will 
prove a great help in several ways to the 
College. 

Brother Graybill will fall right in line 
with the church work and true education, 
and with his strong hand, great energy, 
and determination, will bring to the as- 
sistance of the College that true type of 
German character that knows no such 
word as fail. 



Students like the dining hall recitation. 
The preparation is automatic and natural, 
hence three recitations daily. 



Elizabethtown Colleqe's Fifth Annual 
Session. 

From the Elizabethtown Chronicle, Sept. 9th. 

The exercises of the Fifth Annual Ses- 
sion of the ElizaV)ethtown Colleoje opened 
on Monday and ended on Tuesday, with 
a large attendance. 

The weather was ideal, all that could 
be desired by the most exacting of the 
participants and the audiences. 

There was enrolling of students, exam- 
ination of new ones and classification of 
all took place during Monday. 

Prof. W. J. Wickey of the Middletown 
schools, delivered the principal address on 
Monday evening. 

The public meeting on Tuesday was 
well attended. Elder J. A. Long, of York, 
delivered the main address, taking for 
his suV)ject "Looking Back." Both these 
men handled their subjects in a masterly 
manner. These were followed by able 
and interesting addresses by other speak- 
ers. 

The Board of Trustees met on Tuesday 
afternoon. 

The program of exercises was carefully 
prepared, whirh was very evident from 
its excellence. Every one rendered his or 
her part in a decidedly creditable man- 
ner, creditable to students, to the faculty 
and to the college. 

It was an occasion that will long be re- 
membered as one of profit and intellectual 
entertainment. 

The Fall term opens with an increased 
number of pupils and with the brightest 
prospects for the most successful session 
ever known in the history of this excel- 
lent institution of learning. 

At Work. 

On October 16, Brother Reber preached 
in town along with Elder Zug. Brother 
P. S. Davis addressed the Children's 
Meeting in the forenoon. Brother Ober 
addressed the Children's Meeting at 
Fairview, and Brother Sanger addressed 
the Children's Meeting at East Hanover, 
Dauphin county. 



€)ur Col lege Cimeg. 

EDITORIAL STAFF. 

EDITOK IN CHIEF : ' 
I. N. H. BEAHM. 

ASSOCIATE EI>ITOR9: 

D. C. REBER, I. E. SHOOP. ELIZABETH MEYER 

SPECIAL EDITORS : 

Local Editor, - - - MRS. F. W. GROFF 
Society Editor, - - MARY B. HESS 

BUSINESS MANAGEMENT ; 

Managing Editor and Bu.sincss Manager. 

H. K. OBER 

ASSOCIATES : 

J. M. MILLER, IRA MYERS 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES. 

M. .1. Hollada is mail carrier. 



Our College Times is published bi-monthly. 
Subscription price (six numbers) 'Ih cents, single 
copy 5 cents. 



Chapel is well attended. 



The bell rin^s — '" class excused." 

What can you do to advance the inter- 
ests of the College? 

Read Prof Oher on "Elizabethtown 
Collejie," in this issue. 



Give a careful reading to the article by 
Dr. Rel)er on "Implanting Ideals." 



Brother Krei«ler casts a bigger shadow 
than any other trustee; that accounts for 
the relative length of his sketi-h. . 



Prof. Davis delivered an address at 
Maple Dale Local Inetitute, October 20, 
on "The Teacher an Artist." It was well 
received. 



The brief sketches of our trustees are 
now concluded. The board have worked 
hard — in fact they may have been 
"worked down." But they are now 
"written up." Rig things are expected 
from our Board in the future. They will 
certainly prove equal to every task. We 
so pray and so believe. 



The outlook for the winter term is 
bright. 

Mr. Shoop is teaching shorthand eflS- 
cientlv. 



Prof. Cher's Physics cla.es is big and 
busv. 



Dr. Reber has very large classes in 
Psychology and Geometry. 



MIhs Myer is presiding officer in the 
dining hall. She's a good one — prompt 
and orderly. 

Oct. 9th, Dr. I. H. Albright, of Leb- 
anon delivered a beautiful and practical 
talk to the student body, for which they 
were very thankful 



By special invitation, Dr. H. L"". Roop, 
president of Lebanon Valley College, 
delivered an address in the Chapel on 
Oct. 6th, which was thoughtful and 
polished. It was delightfully received. 
Call again, Doctor. 



Prof. J. M. Pittingerand wife, enroute 
to India, visited the College and addressed 
the students, morning and evening of Oct. 
21. Prof. Pittinger was a member of the 
faculty here last year, and his many 
friends were (ielighted to see his smiling 
face again, and his noble wife left an 
deep impression on the place and school. 
"Our College Times" joins in praying 
them great success in their field of foreign 
labor among the heathen of India, where 
they go to carry the Gospel of Jesus. 

On the same uiorning Elder John Herr 
addressed the students by special invita- 
tion and spoke in a very pointed and 
forceful way, leaving the impression that 
if a student is not definitely settled as to 
his life work, if he will be honest and 
busy then he will be ready when his life 
work is planned and chosen. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES. 



Implanting Ideals. 

The profession of teachinu; has been 
well styled the noblest profession. An- 
alyze the motives that spur the lawyer, 
the doctor, the journalist, the preacher 
and the teacher. All except the last two 
think of making: money and this thought 
incites them daily before, as well as after, 
they enter their respective vocations. 
The true teacher does not merely give 
drills in reciting the multiplication tables, 
declensions, and facts; hut while engaged 
in the daily routine of the school room, 
he wants to do the boys and girls good. 
His thought and en<^rgy are not spent in 
selfish but in altrustic pursuit. Conse- 
quentyl, mcved by beneficent, Christ-like 
impulses, the work of the true teacher is 
far superior to that of other occupations, 
the gospel ministry alone being excepted. 
Just as men are higher than money, so 
much is the making of men and women 
out of boys and girls higher and nobler 
than the making of money. 

The teacher deals with growing and 
developing minds. Flis purpose is to im- 
bue these with high purposes, to put lie- 
fore them a worthy example of manhood 
or womanhood by his or her life, and to 
implant from history and literature, cor- 
rect and exalted ideals of patriotism, 
honesty, tenacity, industry, integrity, 
and heroism in their minds. To be a 
man, nay a christian man, and not a 
money king — is the ideal which the 
teacher tries to hold before the pupil. 
It is plain therefore that, eenerally speak- 
ing, great teachers have not been rich 
lest perchance by marriage they have in- 
herited riches ; for wealth has not been 
the object of their endeavor. 

It is the confession of many an ex- 
teacher that the years he spent in the 
school-room playing the role of teacher 
have been the most useful years of his 
life. He meets his boys and girls in life. 
Their eyes sparkle; their hearts glow 
with kindly feeling; and their lips convey 
a message of gratitude and helpfulness that 
constitutes the teacher's best reward. 
Such pay the merchant ami farmer seldom 



get. Yet more than all this, the teacher 
is made to feel that he has not lived in 
vain, for he realizes that his pupils got 
from him ideals of a higher life and are 
living accordingly. 

Implanting ideals of the higher life con- 
stitutes the chief function of the teacher. 
To fulfill this mission he must possess a 
higher order of qualifications than schol- 
arship or pedagogical training. He must 
have an unimpeachable character em- 
bodying such traits as are to be produced 
in the rising generation. To furnish in- 
dividuals tit to occupy the lofty position 
of teacher,schools and colleges are needed 
that will guarantee such a standard of 
qualifications in their graduates. 

Most schools aim to pack knowledge 
in the minds of their pupils and that is 
all. The boy resents that, because he 
knows that that is not for which he was 
created. The disappointed boy plans to 
play tricks on the teachers, and trouble 
arises. Many teachers fail to come in 
heart-to-heart contact with their pupils; 
that is, they fail to come to the pupils' 
plane of living and thinking. For this 
reason he cannot know their troubles 
and difficulties and so can not give the 
needed synipathy. They fail to convince 
them that they are working for their 
good and ultimate happiness which can 
be attained only by wholesome discipline. 

The first aim of education at Elizabeth- 
town College is the building of noble 
christian character. The College manage- 
ment endeavors to make this school un- 
excelled in giving young men and women 
that physical, mental, and moral equip- 
ment that will be needed to perform life's 
work in an age of progress and competi- 
tion. Realizing the power of correct and 
lofty ideals, it expects to send out stu- 
dents whose minds are free from narrow, 
erroneous, and selfi^ih views of life, but 
filled with the righteous ambition to be 
a factor for good. 



The sphere of Elizabethtown College- 
useful, unique, ideal. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES. 



Elizabethtown College. 

A part of an address dt'livercd before the Key- 
stone Literary Society by Prof. H. K. Ober. 

Nearly every educational institution in 
the Uniteci States has been founded under 
diflferent conditionp. A nuiid)er of them 
have been founded by one or several rich 
men. Some of the others by different 
religious fraternities. Others attain have 
had their origin at the hands of an asso- 
ciation or company. In most cases, the 
primary object of each institution differs 
slifihtly from that of the others, and yet, 
in most cases the wishes and reque-^ts of 
the originators or founders are respected 
and fulfilled. 

Elizaf)ethto\vn College was not founded 
by one man, but by a number of big- 
hearted, generous persons, who have 
given of their money and time so as to 
make her existence possible, with her 
doors open to all who wish to take ad- 
vantage of the opportunities. Of course, 
we do not forget that the primary object 
of the College was to found a school which 
is to be under the management of the 
Brethren church, and thus found a church 
home for their children while at school. 
They wanted a school which stands for 
true education and for nothing else. This 
fact will always remain and we, as teach- 
ers, as students, as trustees, must ever 
remember the wishes of those who have 
made this College possible. We must be 
willing to stand for true education and in 
so doing we will certainly not be guided 
only by what is done at other institutions. 
We are willing to eradicate anything that 
is not a part of true education. 

We are under the management of the 
church, and we must stand for and with 
her if we mean to succeed. On the other 
hand our success has never been so certain 
as it now is, if our patrons feel that we 
have the courage and backbone to stand 
by them T have received renewed cour- 
age within the last month, when one of 
the patrons who is not a member of the 
Brethren chunih, said, "I am willing to 
pay a little inore money than it would 
cost to have my son attend a school nearer 



home, if I can I'eel that my 6<m is in hands 
of a faculty of teachers who have back- 
bone enough to stand against the objec- 
tionable features in many of our colleties 
to-day." This is only one of the many 
who are hxjking this way with anxious 
eye«. We will get new buildings and 
new additions, if the church and our 
patrons can feel that they may safely 
place their confidence in us. Let us keep 
faithfully oti, standing firmly for the 
cause of frnr educdtion. 

Someone not long ago said, "Y^s, I see 
that Christ is to be the centre of this in- 
stitution." What better recommendation 
do we want than this? Our school must 
succeed and will succeed if we continue 
to stand for Him who is supreme. 

Members of the Board of Trustees, 
members of the faculty, and students, 
there are large responsibilities upon us 
and if we are united and willing to remain 
firm we shall be able to bear them. We 
shall be able to make our College what 
(iod wants it to be, and surely no one 
wants to make it anvthing else. 



Supt. Wickey, of Town, Delivered Ad- 
dress at Opening Exercises. 

From the Middletown ,Io\irnal of September 10. 

The fifth annual session of Elizabeth- 
town College was entered upon on Mon- 
day, with appropriate exerci.ees which 
were continued on Tuesday. Prof. H. J. 
Wickey, superintendent of the schools 
from town and Mr. J. B Martin attended 
the exercises from this place 

Supt. Wickey made the chief address 
at Monday's exercies, giving an excellent 
talk on the ditlerent phases of education, 
its effect on the community at large, ami 
the good results obtained from advanced 
educational iLstitutions. 



Meetings in the Chapel. 

Since the September issue interesting 
sermons have been delivered in the 
Chapel by Brethren Falkenstein, Reber, 
Sanger and Kline These meetings occur 
every two weeks on Sunday evening. 



OUR COLIvEGE TIMES. 



Locals. 

BY MRS. F. W. G. 

Miss Tillie Booser, teacher of Witmer's 
school, near Bachmanville, visited at the 
College on Sunday, October 16. 

Mr. Samuel G. Meyer has accepted the 
position as teacher of the Steven's Hill 
school. 

.Miss Effie Shank, teacher of Beates' 
school, reports that she is enjoying her 
work. 

Mr. John Henry, '04, of Rheems, has 
been employed as clerk in S. P. Engle 
& ('o.'s store at that place. 

Miss Gruber. a former student, visL-ited 
in Elizabethtown over Sunday, Oct. 16. 

Mr. Henry K. Garman '04, is still em- 
ployed bv C. Soflis, Woodbury, N. J 

The smiling face of Miss Lizzie Hies- 
tand was seen in our midst over Sunday, 
October 16. 

Prof. J. M. Pittinger visited at the Col- 
lege on Friday, October 21. He was on 
his way to New York from which place 
he sailed for India. 

Miss Minnie Ginder and Mr. Isaiah 
Oberholtzer students of last year, are 
now among the number of progressive 
school teachers of Rapho township, Lan- 
caster county. They report encourag- 
ingly f'oncerning their work. 

Judging from what we hear, Mr. Wen. 
dell Bpker is doing successful work in the 
school house on the hill just east of the 
College. 

Miss Lizzie Eby. of Lancaster and Miss 
Bessie Rider, of Elizabethtown. both of 
the class of '08, are holding their posi- 
tions as trustworthy employees. A char- 
actpristic of Elizabethtown College 
students. 

A word of praise is due Mr. Ober Morn- 
ing for bis loyalty to his present work in 
tace of a better position financially. 

Thus far all the graduates of Elizabeth- 
town College desiring positions have been 
employed. This speaks well for our 
College. 



Mr. Walter Gish '04 has again enrolled 
as a student at the College. 

The reports from Mr. Kiefer '04, of 
Lititz, are all of the kind that we are 
pleased to hear. 

Send twenty-five cents and we will 
send you Our College Times for one 
full vear. 



The College Opening. 

Sept 5th and 6th were inspiring days 
on College Hill. Enrolling and organiz- 
ing with the execution of two public 
protirams formed the order of business. 
Members of the faculty participated in 
each of the two sessions, Monday evening 
and Tuesday morning The audiences 
were up to the most sanguine expectations. 

The chief address on Monday evening 
was delivered by Prof. J. H. Wickey, 
superintendent of the schools of Middle- 
town, Pa. His address was exceedingly 
appropriate, witty and rich. LI is style 
was pleasing, and every lesson well pur. 
His eSbrt was profoundly appreciated 

On Tuesday morning Elder J. A. Long, 
of York, delivered an address which was 
carefully laid out, wholesome in advice, 
happy in manner, and weighty in lesson. 
The institution was very much encour- 
aged by both these addresses, and we hope 
that we may in due time have these 
gentlemen with us auain. 

Our opening enrollment was forty-eight, 
and since then the enrollment has grown 
to sixty-nine. The attendance is more 
encouraging than it has ever been. For 
this increase of attendance and interest 
the management is indebted to the help- 
fulness of teaciiers, of the trustees, of the 
students themselves, and of the public;. 



Be sure to notify the Business Manager 
if \ou do not get the paper regularly. 



Prof. Davis's class in penmanshi|) is 
the laigest in the history of the College. 
It is quiet and bu.sy, too. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES. 



At Mountville. 

On Saturday, September 17, our editor 
went, by invitation, to the beautiful town 
of Mountville, situated seven miles west 
(if T.ancaster. 

In the comfortable home of Elder H. E. 
Lifrht, was found p:ider I. W. Taylor. 
The same evening Bro. Taylor preached 
in the Mountville church on"conversion." 
Having spoken carefully on the nature 
and importance of conversion, he stated 
that some leading evidences of conver- 
sion are : Hatred of sin and A holy life. 

The night was spent at Brother Isaiah 
Musser's near Columbia Brother Amos 
Hottenstein was also there. Next morn- 
ing found us at Manor, where our editor 
and Brother Taylor officiated in the 
breaking of the Bread of Life. 

At dinner we were well fed at Brother 
Rhenk's home. Children's Day services 
at Mountville at 2 p. m. Brother Taylor 
addressed the meeting in a very impres- 
sive way on the "Power of Influence." 
The other visitor followed with an ad- 
dress. The Sunday school at Mountville 
this season has V)een very earnest and 
concentrated; noted for its interest and 
general quality rather than numbers, 
which after all really measures the in- 
fluence. 

It is hoped that the time will soon 
come when all Sunday schools may be 
evergreen. 

Brother Taylor left for Ephrata to at- 
tend the evening services. 

The speaker enjoyed the attendance 
and attention of the evening services at 
the Mountville church. Happy recollec- 
tions of the Mountville visit. 



A Trip to York County. 

It was recently our pleasure as an edit- 
or, to take a trip to the Black Rock con- 
gregation, York county. We were met 
at the station, Lineboro, Md., by Abram 
Miller, and soon landed at the home of 
Elder E. S. Miller, who is the father of 
John G. Miller, an esteemed student of 
the Elizabethtown College. John G. is 



home on a little vacation, but has prom- 
ised to return in the near future. 

There were two meetings held in the 
Black Rock church. These meetings 
were well attended, and full of interest. 
Membership here seems to be very loyal 
and warm-hearted. There is a very ex- 
cellent church house, most beautifully 
located. 

The congregation has for its V)ishop, 
Brother Miller, who is nmch beloved. 
He is ably assisted by Brethren Price, 
Baugher and Baugher. 

We had a nice drive to Glen Rock on 
Sunday afternoon, took the train; in a 
few hours, by way of Harrisburg, lanced 
at Elizabethtown. 

People of Black Rock congregation 
seem to be very favorably impressed with 
the Elizabethtown College. They seem 
to think that Elizabethtown College, sur- 
rounded as it is by such a strong repre- 
sentative membership, and in connection 
with the spirit that pervades the school, 
has a double opportunity of becoming an 
exemplary college among our people. 
We hope that the Black Rock people will 
do all they can to make our College just 
what it ouglit to be. 



Children's Meeting. 

On Sunday afternoon. Oct. 16, an inter- 
esting children's meeting was held in the 
Brethren church in Elizabethtown. The 
brightness of the day without seemed an 
index of the spirit of joy and religious 
fervor within the hearts of the children 
and older ones assembled in the church. 

The little folks recited well the pieces 
their teachers had taught them. They 
were then very pleasantly and profitably 
addressed by Bro. .lames Lehman, of York, 
on the subject of "Clinging," by Prof. P. 
S Davis of Elizabethtown College on the 
subject of "Slinging," and by Eld. S. R. 
Zug, who seems like a father among the 
children. 

A large congregation listened atten- 
tively to these exercises, and no doubt 
many went away feeling it was good for 
them to have been there. k. m. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES. 



The Bible Term. 

On January 11, next, the Fifth Annual 
Bihle Term at Elizabethtown College will 
open. The prospects are encouraging for 
a good attendance. Please send in your 
name as soon as you have decided to at- 
tend, so that we can make arrangements 
for everybody. 

There will be a circular issued in De- 
cember, if not earlier. It will be in book- 
let form, and will give full information as 
to program, costs, different speakers, 
teachers, lodging, boarding, books, etc. 
It might be well for you to send a card 
making application for the booklet, so 
that when it is ready you will 
be sure to receive one ; and while you 
are sending a card please send names of 
others that should have a copy of the 
booklet, respectively. 

Several members of the faculty will 
take part in the daily program. Brother 
Hertzler will teach a class, but the main 
teacher will be Brother Royer, of Mount 
Morris. Brother Rover is very genial, 
rich in experience, full of life, and withal 
a fine teacher. So that our equipment 
for the next Bible Term will perhaps not 
be surpassed by any in the brotherhood. 

There will also be preaching every 
night by different speakers the fore part 
of the term; and then in the latter part. 
Brother Royer will preach every night. 



Petersburg Children's Day Services. 

On September 25, Profs. Sanger and 
Beahra drove to Salunga. Before preach- 
ing they visited Brother Herr's home 
where they found his daughter. Sister 
Raffensberger, who has been undergoing 
a long siege* of serious affliction. Her 
faith and joy have been so great that she 
is triumphing beautifully. It is always 
an inspiration to visit the curtain of af- 
fliction when there are such spirits en- 
during the crucial test. 

The preaching services were in the Sa- 
lunga house. Elder Falkenstein preached 
from the text, I Cor. 6, 19:20. He was 
followed somewhat briefly in bc^th Eng- 



lish and German. 

They dined at Brother Forney's where 
they were cared for in the very best of 
comfort for both body and soul. 

At 2 p. m. the Children's Day service 
was opened by Prof. Sanger The child- 
ren were addressed by Brethren Beahm, 
Falkenstein and Hottenstein. Brother 
Forney is the superintendent. He has 
attended his work well during the season, 
and a verj"^ excellent Sunday School has 
been carried on at that place. 

East Petersburg is not only a nice town 
in a goodly land, but some of the best 
people in Lancaster county live there. If 
you want a nice visit some time, go to 
East Petersburg, and then you will have 
a good chance to get it. 



Green Tree Church. 

On Sunday, September 11, a number of 
the school people attended the services at 
(Treen Tree. Elder Amos Hottenstein 
preached a very impressive sermon in 
the forenoon. In the afternoon was the 
Children's Day service. Brother Hiram 
Kaylor is the superintendent of the 
school, and is well assisted in both of- 
ficers and teachers. 

The school is encouragingly large, and 
a fine spirit is maintained. Brother Hot- 
tenstein addressed the children in a beau- 
tiful way on, "The Wisdom of Four 
Little Things." Short talks were also 
given by Brother S. R. Zug, Daniel 
Eshelman and your editor. 

The meeting was largely attended, well 
conducted and left a wholesome impres- 
sion. 



A Nice Word. 

Denver, Pa., Sept. 26, 1904. 
Dr. D. C. Reber, 

Dear Brother: — Enclosed find twenty- 
five cents for "Our College Times.'' I 
have received several copies and find 
much pleasure in reading the paper, 
obliged, Respectfully yours, 

Anna Rover. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES. 



The Keystone Literary Society. 

The iiit'Ptinirs of tin* Kcyptone IJtcrary 
Society of Klizabetlitown Collef/e are 
frrowinjr in interest and in nninbeip. 
Work of this kind ip of incalcnlablc a<i- 
vantagP. and many of the studentp seeiii 
to appreciate this, and co-operate heart- 
ily in the work. 

Diirinfr the term the followinjr resohi- 
tions liave been debated: 

Resolved, That education increaii(>s hap- 
piness. Affirmative, tieortre Litrht and 
Wendel Baker. Nesrative, J. M Miller 
and Prof. Diivip. 

Resolved, That ambition contain? more 
of vice than of virtue Affirmative, .James 
Breitijran and Charles Shoop. Nejrative, 
Minerva Stauffer and I. E. Shoop. 

Resolveci, That times of war produce 
greater statesmen than times of peace. 
Affirmative, Prof. Davis and Lydia Buck- 
waiter. Negrative, Prfif. T'.eahin and Jacob 
Myer. 

Resolved, That the offering of prizes as 
an incentive to study is not a good prac- 
tice. Affirmative, George Light and Mary 
Hertzler. Negative, I. E. Shoop and C. 
J. Han ft. 

Resolved, That the decline of England 
as a world power has begun. Affirma- 
tive, Jacob Myer and I. E. Shof)p. Neg- 
ative John Stayer and George Light. 

The following recitations have been 
given: 

The Charity Fair, Sue Buck waiter. 

The Blacksmith's Store, Ruth Stayer. 
Seeing Things at Niffht, l^nella Foselsanger 
A Georgia Volunteer, Mary Hess. 

An American Exile, Lydia Buckwalter. 
The Unt)arred Door, Annie Wolgeuuith. 

The society is fortunate in having so 
many members wh© are able singers, 
thus making tbe music an important 
feature of the program. 

The officers at present are, Charles 
Shoop, president; Walter K. Gish, vice 
president: Ruth Stayer, secretary; Marv 
Hess, editor; Luella Fogelsanger, critic. 



Sunday School Meeting. * 

On Snndav altenioon of ()ctolier 1(5, a 
very interesting and largely attended Sun- 
day school meeting was held in the F'air- 
view church. The services were inter- 
esting and impressive, consisting of sing- 
ing and addresses. Elder Cyrus Gihble 
from near Lititz gave the first talk, on the 
subject "Little Things." He was followed 
by H. K. 01>er, of F:iizal>ethtown Col- 
lege, on "The importance of Good 
Sunday Schools and Good Homes." 
Elder Hiram Git)ble, who is in 
charge of this church, gave a very en- 
couraging a< Id ress 1o the Sunday school 
and its officers. 

This church has a lar^-e opportunity, 
being a fine location for Sunday school 
work. Charles Madeira was the sn- 
perinteuflent, and Bro. J. B. Brubaker 
was the al)le assistant. Bro. David Ehy 
and Bro. Jacob B. Kuip are two of the 
members who stuck to the work unflinch- 
ingly They deserve much credit. God 
will bless the effort put forth atFairview, 
and by next spring they will have a larger 
Sunday school tfian now. h. k. o. 



The New Chapel. 

]\lany important things do not come at 
once. We are growing more and more 
in need of more building facilities; and it 
is necessary for every friend to talk. This 
is not the soliciting time, still more, not 
the paying time; but we are now in the 
talking period, evidently, and we must 
talk Let every reader and friend of the 
College present this matter prudently 
and earnestly. That additional facilities 
are needed should be encouraging to 
everybody Do not talk it- down, but 
talk it up. You can help pay it up later. 

Increased room is one of the necessary 
consequences of growth. The friends of 
the College must decide. Ihe trustees 
are considering this matter wisely. Lei 
evervbodv encourage them! 



Aliss Lydia Buckwalter is assistant li- 
nrarian. * 



Subscribe for OiR College Ti.mes for 
von do not want to miss a number. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES. 



II 



Hoffer's Meeting House. 

At the Conewago meeting house, com- 
monly called Hoffer's, a very interesting 
Sunday school was carried on during the 
second and third quarters of the year. 
Brother J. B. Aldinger superintended the 
school. He was well assisted liy officers 
and teachers The school was not so large 
hut noted rather for the quality, which 
after all is the real test. 

On October 9th, this school held Chil- 
dren's Day services. Elder E.M. VVenger 
of Fredericksburg, Pa. was chief speaker. 
His talk was listened to with great inter- 
est. He showed that there are sixty 
Sunday schools in the State district, of 
which he himself is district secretary, 
and that there is an aggregate of five 
thouean<l in attendance. He presented 
in a favorable manner the idea of the 
Sunday schools of the district supporting 
a foreign missionary, which was granted 
or recommended at the last district 
meeting. 

He showed also that a contribution of 
five cents from each scholar in the dis- 
trict would suf)port a missionary, and 
the boys and girls present were very ready 
to contriVmte their shares respectively. 
No doubt all the boys and girls of the 
district are ready just the same. It simply 
remains, therefore, for the Sunday school 
workers to decide the matter and the 
work will be done. 

Brother VVenger is the Sunday school 
leader of the district, and he is leading 
the way properly. He should receive 
encouragement from every section. 

Brother Beahm followed with a short 
talk and was delighted vrith the interest 
which was taken in the remarks. It was 
universally conceded that the Children's 
Day servi(;e was a success. 

The singing was very nice throughout, 
and was led by Sister Ada VVitmer. 



Ministerial Meeting. 

In the Brethren church at Ephrata, 
Nov. 2 and 3, 1904, there will be held a 
ministerial meeting under the aus[iices of 
the district committee, composed of Elders 
J. H. Longenecker, Jesse Zeigler and S. 
H. Hertzler. 

There will be two sessions, the after- 
noon and evening of Nov. 2, convened 
expressly to discuss the interests of the 
Sunday school. The committee has 
fornmlated and circulated a very com- 
plete and important program. You 
should see the program, and what is 
more important you should be present to 
hear and to take part in the execution of it. 

The Ephrata brethren will do their part 
to make the meeting a suci'ees. They are 
good organizers, and have a fine spirit of 
Christian work in their midst, and they 
are blest with a goodly share of that open- 
handed hospitality that everybody so 
niuch enjoys. 



The enrollment grows. 



An Ordination Service. 

October 20, in Elizabethtown, Bishops 
J. H. Longenecker, H E. Light, John 
Herr as a committee from the districtt 
meeting of Elders, ordained brethren 
Hertzler and Beahm to the full ministry 
of the church. Eider Longenecker led 
in the service which was an impressive 
one. Elder Zug offered his resignation 
as Bishop of the Elizabethtown church. 
Wisely, ii was not accepted. He then 
called for an assistant. By vote the lot 
fell on S. H. Hertzler as assistant Bishop 
ot the church. Brother Hertzler enters 
the work with the prayers of his people. 

Club Rates. 

Get up a club of subscribers as we offer 
the following rates: 

To a club of five $1.00 

To a club of eleven 2.00 

To a club of sixteen 3.00 



WANTED— At least 200 new subscrib- 
ers within the next thirtv davs. 



Bishop H. E. Ligiit, of Mountville, 
made a pleasant call at the College in 
September. 



12 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES. 



A Word of Joy. 

Our busy, hut delij^litful days move 

rapidly, almost unconsciously, when we 

consider, we find that already we are 

slidinir towani the close of the Fall term. 

Thanks to our teachtTs at our side, 

Who help us salVly down the slide. 

BAKBARA WEAVER. 



A Business Letter. 

A letter having a true l)nsiness jingle, 
written at Bareville, Pa , October 17, to 
Prof, Myer by S L. Groff, is: "I have 
now fully decided to come to College. 1 
expect to come to-dav two weeks. Please 
send me particulars." 



Plants and Flowers. 

U. G Lehman, the florist, has a 
choice collection of potted plants and 
flowering plants. Carnations a specialty. 
Visit his (ireenhouses on North Market 
street, Elizabethtown, Pa. 

Mr Livengood can combine books and 
manual labor all right. 



J. M. Miller and D. L. Landis are 
furnishing some nice heat. 



Miss Good is developing mucvh inte est 
in the music department. 



Miss Fogelsanger is doing good work 
in typewriting instruction 



200 new subscribers now demanded. 
Must have them. Do your part. 



Brother G. N. Falkenstein is doing ac- 
tive evangelistic work in Indiana. 



Quite a number of friends who attended 
the U. B. Conference held in Elizabeth- 
town the first week of October visited at 
the College, among them was Rev. 
Wengert of Lebanon, a class-mate of Miss 
Mver's at Millersville. 



Local Institute. 

By special arrangement the writer, ac- 
companied by Christian Reider, attended 
a local Teachers' Institute, held Oct. 20, 
1904, at the IMapledale School, Conewago 
Township, Daui)hin County, Pa. 

The pi'ogram executed was interesting. 
The debate, licsolced, That Education 
does more to form character than Na- 
ture, was well ventilated. The discus- 
sions on nifihods formed proved clearly 
that the teachers of said township are of 
the artist type rather than of the artisdu. 
Probably the most pleasing feature of 
the evening was a solo rendereti by one 
of the little girls of the Mapledale school. 
The building in which the Institute was 
held is a commodious structure, with fine 
surroundings, and most tastefully decora- 
ted on the inside, which reflects very 
creditablv on the teachers. 



Misses Layser and Frantz are getting 
some nice compliments as good cooks. 



Prof. Sanger finislies the day's work 
with a large and active class in General 
H istory. 

The town water is a great boon at the 
College. A vote of thanks especially to 
B. G. Groflf and the Board. 

Miss Fogelsansrer prepared a complete 
list of names of students attending Col- 
lege. But spa(;e forbids printing it in 
this issue. 

Miss Sue Buck waiter, and George and 
Weaver Buck waiter, know the dignity of 
labor, and can push a good program of 
studies as well. 



Dear Reader,you have received a sample 
copy of OtR Coi-LEGE TiMEs SO as to give 
you an idea of what it is. We know you 
like it. It contains all the news of the 
Elizal)ethtown College. You do not 
want to miss a number. It costs only 
25 cents for one whole year. Let us 
have your subscription. 




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LANCASTER WAREROOMS, 

S36 E3A.ST ICHSJ-Q ST. 

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and and 
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at 

THE BOOK STORE 

G. N. Falkenstein 

Elizabethtown, 

Pa. 

Mail Orders Solicited 

History of Sunday 
The Brethren School Supplies 


H* S* Hottenstein 

CABINET-MAKER 

AND UNDERTAKER 

A full line of FURNITURE always on 
hand. Call to see me. My lines will 
please you. Undertaking carefully at- 
tended to. 

Elizabethtown, Pa. 


GEO. D. BOGGS 

DEALER IN 

STOVES, RANGES, 
HOUSEFURXISHING GOODS, 

and a fall line of 

HARDW^ARE 

Call to see us, we will supply your wants 
S. Market St. Elizabethtown, Pa. 


Hornafius' Cafe 

OYSTERS in every style 
ICE CREAM, 

SODA WATER 

Fine line of Confections always on hand 

MEALS AT ALL HOURS 


J. G. STAUFFER 


GI5E Z McQRIDE 






























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Flour, feed. Grain, Salt, 

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J". ]V[ . KIXJ Pi INT. Jr. 
CHOICE BREAD A/ND CAKES 

Weddings and Parties Supplied with) pancy CaKes at Short Notice. 
S. M:><\R,IiBT ST., ELIZABETHTOV^N. FA. 

STUDENTS and PROFESSORS 

as well ae other people will be made to feel at home when they come to our store. 

J. N- OLWEILEf^. the leading Clothier and Men's Furnisher, 
Agent for Lebanon Steam Laundry. ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

All the News in the 
ELIZABETHTOWN CHRONICLE 

ONLY THE BEST JOB PRINTING. 



JACOB FISHER 

Watchmaker t Jeweler 

spectacles and Eyeglasses 
Fitted 



Centre Square, 



Elizabethtown, Pa. 



CONTRACTOR and BUILDER 

COAL, FEED, GRAIN, 
LUMBER and STONE 



BALMER'S BAKERY 

Choice Bread 

Rolls and Cakes 

OF ALL KINDS. 

8. MARKET ST., ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



Elizabethtown, 



Pa. 



HARRY MILLER 
CABINET MAKER AND UNDERTAKER 

FULL LINE OF FURNITURE 



S. Market St., 



Elizabethtown, Pa. 



A. W. Martin 

COAL, WOOD, GRAIN, 
FLOUR and FEED 

Telephone 

Elizabethtown, - Pa. 

J. C. MEIN'S 

Shaving Haircutting 

P A. R, Li O K. 
S. narket St. Elizabethtown, Pa. 



r 







JACOB D. RIDER 



Printing, Designing, 

Engraving, and 

Steel Die Stamping 



20 N. Queen Street, LANCASTER, PA. f 



Both Phones. 



N^^^^Ar 



ANCHOR SPRING W^AGON WORKS. 




H. H. NISSLEY, Prop. Manufacturers of 

BUSINESS WAGONS AND DEALERS IN PLEASURE VEHICLES OF MODERN DESIGNS 

W. HIGH STREET. ELIZABETHTOWN. PA. 



A. BUCK'S SONS CO. 



Manufacturers of the Famous 

EAGLE LAWN SWING 

You want one of these home " beantifiers." 
Write for prices and catalogue. 

LAND ROLLERS, WHEEL- 
BARROWS, STEEL AND OAST 

InuN I nUUunv), and a full line up-to-date foundry articles 

Corn Shellers^ 




There is no better sheller 

made than our 



NO. 3 

ONE-HOPPER, RIGHT HAND SHELLER 

with cob separator and sieve, as 

shown in the accompanying cut. 

Weight 125 pounds. 

NO. 7 



A TWO-HOPPER LEFT HAND SHELLER 

furnished «ith adjustable shaker. *#) 
For hand or power use. 
Weight 280 lbs. 





We manufacture the 

Wooden Stave 

and 

Steel Face 

LAND ROLLER 



^^^^^^■^BPI^^7^^F<v'"''/<'.i.«?:;^.>..j They are built like all our 
^^^^'"'^Si^iiff^^^-^^^^''*''^'-^^-''^'- goods are, for service. 



Both Phones 



Elizabethtown, Pa. 



I ELIZABETHTOffN EEHANGE BAM I 

i Capital - - $50,000,00 | 

i Surplus and Profits $25,000,00 | 

j* Transacts a general banking business. -^ 

j^ Issues interest bearing Certificates of Deposit. ^ 

^ «ji 

m Jos. H. Rider, President. 4. H. Eshelman, Cashier. % 

^ A. R. Forney, Vice President. I. H. Stauffer, Teller. g 

a» ' W 

a«i Jos. H. Rider, Isaac Wealand, W 

^ Josiah Foltz, Henry E. Landis, 2 

^ Abraham R. Forney, Allen A. Coble, ^ 

^ Jos. G. Heisey, H. J, Gish, 4 

S* Dr. H. K. Blough, Amos C. Fridy, g 

g Dr. A. M. Kalbach. ^ 

& ^ 

WE MOST CORDIALLY INVITE YOU 

To Visit Us In Our Store, 

N. L CORNER, CENTRE SQUARE, ELIZABETHTOWN 

Your personal wants supplied in the following lines : 

Staple and Fancy Goods, Notions, Men's, 

Women's and Childrens Clothing, Boots and 

Shoes, Groceries, Queensware, Etc. 

Wc Ever Stood Ready To Meet All Hoooroble Con)petitioo. 

Soliciting your patronage, we are ever ready to accommodate 

you promptly. 

HERTZLER BROS. & CO. 



: : 

» W. S. SMITH, Pres. B. G. GROFF, Vice Pres. H. C. LEWIS, pashier. * 

« » 

8 * 

i Elizabethtown National Bank • 

* • 

: : 

: : 

2 Geoeral Accounts Solicited. Interest paid « 

« on Special Deposits. Safe Deposit Boxes in « 

» * 

« Steel, Burglar-Proof Vault, for rent. J 

* »■ 
J » 

5 D I -R ECTO-RS ♦ 

« W. S. SMITH PETER N. RUTT AMOS G. COBLE S 

s « 

» B. G. GROFF EM'L DEMMY E. E. COBLE • 

* * 

{ E. C. QINDER J. S. RISSER B. L. GEYER J 

2 * 



W fli 

I A. Dissinger Store | 

I GENERAL MERCHANDISE | 

I The Store that is not pleased unless you are | 
I Who Will Get The Piano? | 

J. HARRY BRUBAKER i 

Ppoprietor. | 




*M> *^ 



€Ii^abetI)totDn College, 



OB «$E <^ 



JANUARY, 1905 



CONTENTS 



^ 



At the Spring Creek Church - 2 

A Trip to Vogansville - 2 

Attended Ministerial Meeting - 6 

Brother John Herr - - 6 

Dedication .... 6 

Editorials • - - 4 

Good Feeling - - 8 

In Lebanon County - - 5 

Keystone Literary Society - 7 

Lancaster Children's Day - 7 

Locals ... 8 

Ministerial Meeting - - 3 



Manners in School - • 6 
New Freedom Schools - - 2 
New Minister . . 7 

Our Alma Mater - . .2 
Series of Meetings - - 6 
The New Chapel - - 1 
The New Year ... 3 
The Conestoga Church - 3 
Three Addresses - - 7 
Lower Cumberland Congregation 8 
Vacation - - - 3 

York Meeting - - - 1 



J. Ts/L. KLXJHasr, Jr. 
CHOICE BREAD AND CAKES- 

Weddings and Parties Supplied with fancy CaKcs at Short Notice. 
S. l>d:A.R.KBJT ST. ElljIZA.BEl'i'HTO'WlSr, FA.. 



Horst's Restaurant 

At! Flavors of 

Ice Cream Soda Water 
Full Line of Confections 

Centre Square. 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

E. E. COBLE 

OPTICIAN AND JEWELER 



Centre Square. 



Elizabethtown, Pa. 



Coal 

Grain 

Flour 

Feed 

Paving Stone 

Building Stone 

Ballast,, Lime and 

Farm Implements* 

piioneNo. 6I2A, RheeiTis, Pa. 



NOW 

is tt)e time to place 
your order for a WiQter 
Suit or Overcoat. 

You will be as glad of 
buying as I am of selling. 

DAVIS, The Tailor, 

Eiizabethtown, Pa. 
I5ARC R. HERR 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

Lancaster Oifioe, 33 North Dnke 6tre«t. 

January 

AND 

February 

are usually looked upon 
as dull months for the 
merchant, but not so with 
us. When the •'Holiday 
Rush*' is over, we find 
many 

Remnants and 

Odds and Ends 

which we will reduce in 
price. We invite you to 
visit our store frequently 
and take advantage of the 
bargains offered. 

S. P. ENGLE, ^"Vi^L'-r"' 



0m College Cime0. 



"Wisdom is the Principal Thing.'" 



-Vol. I. 



Elizabeth town, Pa., January, 1905. 



No. 5. 



\ 



York, Meetings. 

The ministerial and Sunday School 
meetings held in York, Pa,, the 
Southern District of Pennsylvania, on 
November 17 and 18, were a success. 

Elder Henry Beelman was moderator 
of the ministerial meeting and Elder G. 
G. Lehmer was moderator of the Sunday 
School meeting. 

Elders J. B. Brumbaugh and J. M. 
Mohler were present from middle Penn- 
sylvania. They took an active part in 
the work and (heir efforts were much 
appreciated. One member of the faculty 
was present and represented Eastern 
Pennsylvania, by enjoying the entire 
|)rogram and taking some little part. 

The Children's Day of Sunday after- 
noon of November 20, was an event of 
marked interest and worth. Brother 
James P. Lehman superintends the Sun- 
day school, which is a large and flourish- 
ing one. He is also one of the ministers 
of the church in York. 

Elder J. A. Long is bishop and is serv- 
ing very acceptably in both the ministra- 
tion of the word and the direction of the 
work. 

k Prof. G. B. Holsinger of Bridgewater, 
Va., so thoroughly known throughout 
our brotherhood, was present and con- 
dncte(i many beautiful and inspiring song 
services. His work was much appreciated. 
Brother G. G. Lehmers talk on the 
"Child", was one unique in character 
and pvoked intense interest and appre- 
ciation. 



Brother Beahm talked on the "Boy 
David." 

The Brethren in Southern Pennsyl- 
vania demonstrated in these meetings a 
large degree of interest and capacity for 
great and active work in the Master's 
vineyard. 



The New Chapel. 

Every month seems to emphasize more 
fully the need of a large chapel. Other 
building facilities are also demanded; 
pleasant and commodious rooms are 
needed for the commercial school and 
for the day students; more dormitories 
are demanded 

The friends of the institution are re- 
cognizing these growing needs at Eliza- 
bethtown College, and they are e.xpect- 
ing to be given an opportunity to help in 
the furtherance of true education and in 
the growth of our institution. 

The teachers and students are hoping 
and praying that the board of trustees 
will receive every encouragement they 
need in supplying the wants of the Col- 
lege. To supply the building needs will 
call forth some noble efforts from our 
people, but if these efforts are made, the 
workers will, themselves, be bettered and 
the interests of the institution will be 
greatly fostered and encouraged. 

Let every teacher, every student, every 
trustee, every friend of the College re- 
alize in this matter, as in all other similar 
matters, that there is "No Excellence 
without great labor." 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES. 



Note the following quotation from the 
last catalogue: 

"When Elizabethtown College ceaees 
to have needs, her existence will have 
passed away. Therefore need is an evi- 
dence of existence, but it is an evidence 
of life as well. It is with pleasure, there- 
fore, that a few of the needs are enumer- 
ated." 



ment in the hearts of his people which 
will be still standing when the granite 
shall have moldered to dust. 



At the Spring Creek Church. 
On Sunday morning, October 30, our 
editor and Brother Davis drove to the 
Spring Creek meeting house. Preaching 
services at 9:30, well attended, good in- 
terest. Ample refreshments had been 
provided and a verv pleasant time was 
spent until 2 p. m., when the Children's 
Day services began. 

Brother G. W. Henry is superintendent 
of the Sunday school at that place. He 
has handled the work zealously and 
wisely for a number of seasons. He is 
ably assisted t)y a good corps of otfict>rs 
and teachers. The services were spirited; 
the attendance was very large, consisting 
of from eight hundred to one thousand 
people. 

Brother Beahm talked to the school on 
"A Stalk of Corn," and was much pleased 
with the attention and interest taken in 
this farm product. He based his re- 
marks on the scripture, "First the Plant, 
then the ear, after that the full corn in 
the ear." He was followed by pointed 
and impressive addresses from Brethren 
P. S. Davis and .1. H. Longenecker May 
continued success crown the efforts of 
God's people at this place! 

The church property on this sacred 
and historic grountl is among the best in 
theState. The "old stone church" where 
many sermons were preached in days of 
yore is now the home of the sexton. In 
the beautiful cemetery sloping to the 
south, covered with a carpet of green, lie 
the ashes of many that have gone before. 
One spot especially sacred is the resting 
place of the mortal remains of Elder 
William Hertzler, marked by a modest 
atone. But he erected his own monu- 



"Our Alma Mater. " 

The above is the title of a very valuable 
article, written by Bro. E. M. Cobb, 
editor of the "Ingle Nook." It has found 
its way into many College papers. It 
shows the many and stronger advantages 
which the smaller College has over the 
larger one. We regret very much that 
on account of space we cannot print the 
article in full in our little paper. 



A Trip to Vogansville. 

The Children's Day service at Vogans- 
ville was very largely attended. The 
Sunday school is superintended by Bro. 
Isaac Martin. He has a white beard and 
a young heart. 

This is one of the schools noted for its 
activity rather than its size. It has done 
a good work in Vogansville. 

The officers, teachers and school ail 
seem to work harmoniously. 

Special addresses were given by Breth- 
ren Hottenstein and Beahm. 

It was our pleasure to attend several 
appointments for preaching 

Brother I. W. Taylor has charge of the 
congregation. He is well supported in 
the ministry by Brethren Reidenbach 
andS. W. Taylor. 



New Freedom Schools. 

New Freedom is a beautiful town of 
York county, having three flourishing 
schools under the principalship of Prof. 
J. H. Keller, formerly a member of our 
faculty. 

The schools average fifty pupils. The 
work is interesting and progressing nicely. 

We now have several students, Messrs. 
Keller and Marks, from that community 
and expect more. 

Prof. Keller is a staunch friend of 
Elizabethtown College. 



OUR COI.I.EGE TIMES. 



The New Year. 

The old year is gone. The present is- 
sue of Our College Times, is labeled .Jan- 
uary, 1905. The old year brought us joys 
and sorrows, advances and reverses, tri- 
umphs and defeats, repose and labor; but 
the year 1904, strongly emphasized in 
much of our own personal history, and so 
largely in the history of the world, is 
gone, — gone forever. The last moment of 
the year came; we stood where the old 
year atid the new year met; and in the 
language of the poet, breathed forth the 
impressive words: — 

"Tis midnight's holy hour, and silence now 
]s brooding like a gentle spirit, 
O'er a still and pulseless world." 

The old year is buried in the giave of 
the past. The new year i« upon us! 1905! 
How rapidly we are scaling the heights 
of the 20th century! 

A happy New Year to all the friends of 
Elizabethtown College! May this year 
prove one of great interest in behalf of 
our school. The issues of our institution 
are sai^red and lofty. May we commend 
our ways wholly unto the Lord, and work 
mightily by His grace, and pray that He 
may bring ihem to pass. 

We have many needs on College Hill. 
May the Lord, through His people, sup- 
ply them all. We are thankful to the 
friends for what they have done in the 
past, and their future help implore. 



I 



Ministerial Meeting. 

The Ministerial Meeting, held at Eph- 
raia, on November 2nd and 3d, in con- 
nection with the Sunday School Meeting 
at the same time and place, was one of 
the best that your Editor was ever priv- 
ileged to attend. Elder J. H. Longen- 
ecker was moderator of the meeting. 
Elder S. H Hertzler was writing clerk. 
His report of the meeting may be read 
elsewhere. For further information see 
his report. Brother Nathan Martin took 
a short-hand report. He did well. It 
reads like a book — a good one. 



Vacation. 

School adjourned, Friday, December 
23, for Christmas vacation and will open 
on Monday morning, January 2, 1905. 
The students have a joyous feeling over the 
work up to this time, and bright antici- 
pations of pleasant Christmas at home. 

A few of our students remain on Col- 
lege Hill to pursue their studies and to 
help hold things in order. These are 
Messrs. Hanft, Livengood, Hollada and 
Thomas. They represent a good section 
of the country of southern Somerset 
county. Pa., Garrett county, Md., and 
VV. Va. 

We hope to have more students from 
this distant field of patronage in the fu- 
ture. 

It is hoped that after a pleasant and 
joyous Christmas vacation all students 
will return to their several classes with 
renewed vigor and determination to suc- 
ceed. Oh, what a wonderful factor of 
success is this invincible determination! 

Students, let me say right here, as you 
enter upon the New Year, make Mr. In- 
vincible Determination your strong and 
constant companion. 

The Conestoga Church. 

The Sunday school Children's Meeting 
at Bareville on November 6th, was large- 
ly attended. The singing and the general 
spirit of the occasion was of high order. 

The address consisted, first, of a gen- 
eral view of the Sunday school work, and 
second, practical lessons drawn from an 
ear of corn, and third, exortations on 
honesty, diligence, and perseverance. 
Brethren Myer and Wenger are the sup- 
erintendents. The Sunday school cause 
in this place is in a flourishing condition. 

The services in the forenoon in the Eby 
house, near Monterey, were well attend- 
ed. The rotation chapter under con- 
sideration was II. Cor. 9. The resident 
ministers of this congregation are Breth- 
ren Groff, Pfautz, Rover, Ebersole, and 
Graybill. Brother Pfautz does much 
evangelical work, and Brother Grofi' has a 
son in Elizabethtown Codege. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES. 



Our College C(me0. 

EDITORIAL STAFF. 

EDITOR IN CHIEF : 

I. N. H. BEAHM. 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS : 

D. C. REBER, I. E. SHOOP, ELIZABETH MEYER 

SPECIAL EDITORS : 

Local Editor, - - - GEO. H. LIGHT 

Society Editor. - - MARY B. HESS 

BUSINESS MANAGEMENT : 

Managing Editor and Business Manager, 

H. K. OBER 

ASSOCIATES : 

J. M. MILLER, IRA MYERS 

Our College Times is published bi-monthly. 
Subscription price (six numbers) 2.5 cents, single 
copy 5 cents. 

Attend the Bible Term. 



Several from York county are thinking 
of attending Bible Term. 



Brother A. C. Wieand will give us some- 
thing rich. Be sure to hear him. 



Eead the Bible Term circular. If 50U 
don't haye one, call for it immediately. 



Our managing editor has secured many 
additional names to his subscription list. 



Brother Hertzler will unfold the Book 
of Galatians. Don't miss the opportuni- 

ty. 



The Bible Term in January promises to 
be of special interest. Don't fail to be 
present. 



Brother Royer will make his classes 
lively and instructive. You will enjoy 
his work. 



Sister Good will give dailj' lessons in 
Vocal Music, which will prove very help- 
ful to Christian workers. 



The Ejilirata Reporter comes weekly 
to our reading room. The proprietor is 
very kind, putting us on his "exchange" 
list. 



Brother M. D. Early, of Elgin, Idino s 
gave us a call on College Hill, recently. 
He j)reached an edifying sermon in the 
chapel, on "Faith and Courage." 



Sisters Good and Zortman went to New 
York to witness the sailing of eight miss- 
ionaries to India, November 2. Thev re- 
port a very pleasant trip to the Imperial 
City. 



The teachers and students, through a 
committee, sent words of sympathy to 
Mr John S. Baker, a former student of the 
College, on the death of his father and 
mother. 



Hear what Brother A. S. Hottenstein 
has to say: "I received Our College Times, 
I read it through and am well pleased 
with it, so well that I enclose 25 cents to 
receive it regularly. 



The Winter Term opened on December 
5th. Quite a few new students enrolled. 
The enrollment for the winter term is 77, 
and the toial enrollment since school op- 
ened September is 86. 



On account of the short duration of the 
Bible Terra, it is thought that twenty or 
twenty-live Bible Term boarders, though 
crowded, may be lodged at the College. 
Be of good cheer, and reply promptly. 
Write Dr. D. C. Reber at once if you 
want to lodge at the College. 



Mrs. F. W. Groff who has been serving 
efficiently as local editor, has resigned, on 
account of not being in daily contact with 
the school. We regret to^lose her from 
our "staff." George H. Light has been 
chosen as her successor. He will strive 
to till the position creditably. 



OUR COU.EGE TiMEvS. 



5 



Members of the (College Faculty will 
assist, by giving from time to time, some 
contribution to the Bible Term work. 



On the morning of November 4th, Elder 
Jesse Zeigler was present and oflliciated in 
the chapel exercises. He then followed 
with an appropriate address to the teach- 
ers and students, which was cordially and 
gratefully received. 



Those who are engaged in Sunday 
school work or interested in the preach- 
ing of the Word have but a meager con- 
ception at present of how greatly they 
will be helped by Brother Royer's teach- 
ing. 



If you think you can attend the Bible 
Term only one week, then make it a 
special point to be present the first week; 
then yon will likely find that you cannot 
afford to miss the second and third weeks. 
By this method you will be able to at- 
tend the whole three weeks. 



Special effort will be made to room all 
the Bible Term people possible at the 
College. We can stand crowding alright 
for a few weeks Then, besides it is good 
news to be crowded Profs. Reber and 
Beahm will open their houses for Bible 
Termers. Several public rooms in the 
College will be used for lodging, also. 
Therefore, let them come! 



On Saturday, November 5th Profs. Da- 
vis, Beahm, and some of the student body 
attended the Local Institute at Mount 
Joy. The addresses by Prof. Pontz of the 
Elizabethtown High School, and Mark of 
the Mount Joy High School, were very 
carefully prepared and delivered. They 
spoke on the uniformity of courses 
of study for high schools. Ye Editor 
spoke on a bird's eye view of man, and 
was much pleased with the interest given 
to his talk. Tliere is an air of true pros- 
perity about the Mount Joy Schools. 



In Lebanon County. 

It was our pleasure to attend a meeting 
at Lebanon on Saturday evening, Decem- 
ber 17th. Brother Beaver, is con- 
ducting the meetings. He preached an 
impressive sermon from, "Awake, thou 
that sleepest." The next morning he 
gave an earnest discourse in German, in 
the Tulpehocken church. At 2 o'clock in 
the afternoon, the Brethren' closed the 
Sunday school at Heidleberg. The meet- 
ing was largely attended. Addresses were 
made by the editor and Brother Beaver. 
Brethren Edward Kurtz and King are 
the superintendents. The officers and 
teachers have worked faithfully. The 
school has been well attended, and has 
evidently done a good work during the 
past year. There was a joyful distri- 
bution ot books among the scholars and 
others. We feel, especially, to commend 
the idea of giving books in Sunday school 
rather than catering to the physical ap- 
petite. A good book is a good friend, 
constant, patient and helpful. 

Brother John Herr. 

Brother John Herr has been most pain- 
fully afflicted for several months, but is 
now substantiolly recovered. However,he 
is necessarily very careful of his person. 
His severit}^ of pain and great soreness of 
body have beautifully exercised a sweetly 
sanctifying effect. Afflictions doubtless 
have come to us. But likely we have not 
seen the kindly hand of Providence in 
the chastisement, which our dear brother 
has been able to see so greatly. 

Brother Herr has promised. Providence 
permitting, to be with us during our 
Bible Term, and to give us the teachings 
of the HoK scriptures on that central 
Bible theme, "Peace." We pray that he 
may be with us. 



The new classes which opened with the 
winter term have started into their duties 
encouragingly. When classes get beyond 
the "twenty mark'' in a young school, we 
are inclined to think thev are booming. 



OUR COLLHGK TIMKS. 



Manners in School. 

A certain author in a liDok on "Man- 
ners" says, "When we first go ont from 
home it is to enter school, at which, for 
several years, we spend nuich of our time. 
Here our circle of associates widens and 
we find it necessary not only to depend 
upon ourselves more, but to consider the 
rijfhts of others more than in the smaller 
circle of home. Here, also, the relation 
of j)upil to teacher takes the place of that 
of child to ))arent. Therefore it becomes 
a matter of importance that we learn the 
details of courteous conduct which the 
new relations make inevitable. In school 
we need to remember that good manners 
are based upon truthfullness, honesty 
and kindness. Occasions rise for testing 
us in these thintrs much more frequently 
than in the family. There are also cer- 
tain usages peculiar to the school that 
wouM not be considered in order else- 
where, because unnecessary. On account 
of the greater number, less freedom is 
permitted and more formality is required 
than in the family, but the nearer the 
likeness to a good home, the better the 
school. 

When a new pupil enters school those 
who are already accustomed to the place 
should do whatever they can to make 
him feel at home. They should help him 
to becftme acquainted with the others, 
tell him about the regulations of the 
school and show him kindnes.-! in every 
way. If he is awkward or crippled, or un- 
fortunate in any way, it should not be 
noticed except by increased sympathy." 

We heartily agree with the thoughts 
quoted above and hope that our patrons 
may always feel that we aim to conform 
to the j>rinciples set. 

Elizaketii Mver. 



Attended the Ministerial Meeting. 

Many of the people from Elizabethtown 
and the College attended the ministerial 
meeting at Ephrata, Movember 2 and ;^. 
All returned feeling greatly encouraged 
and profited. Ephrata handled the 
mpctinsr well. 



Dedication. 

The First Brethren Church of Phila- 
delphia, with (brother T. T. Myers as pas- 
tor, have greativ enlarge<l their church 
property, and will hold dedication ser- 
vices on January 1, 1905. Our school is 
invited to be represented on that oc- 
casion. 

Sometime early in the year the new 
meeting house which has been erected by 
the Brethren in Harrisburg will be dedi- 
cated. 

Brother ^laitin, who is wide awake 
and gifted in organizing and executive 
talent, is also ably assisted by the mem- 
bership, and under the blessing of God, 
through persistent eflbrt, have greatly 
snccecded; and their church i= nearing 
completion. The dedication services are 
in view. 

We feel to praise the Lord for what has 
t)een done at Harrisburg. 

The churches of the State District have 
nobly assisted by their contributions to 
the Harrisburg work. 

We are very thankful for the liheralty 
the Brethren have manifested toward th(» 
work in our Slate Caf)ital. "The Lord 
loveth a cheerful giver." 



Series of Meetings. 

Brother Weaver of Lancaster, held a 
meeting at Mountville. Brother Levi 
Mohler of Ddlsburg, Pennsylvania, heM 
a meeting at Conewago. Brother Wenger 
of Fredericksburg, preached a series of 
sermons at the Chiques Hill House. 
Brother Falkenetein, held two meetings 
in Ohio, and one in Petersburg. Brother 
Levi Brumbaugh of Maryland, held a 
meeting at Ephrata. Brother S. H. Hertz- 
ler conducted a meeting in the Spring 
Creek House. Brother Sonnon, in the 
Fairview House. Brethren Alfred Ging- 
rich and Amof Hottenstein, jointly, held 
a meeting at Longeneckers, preaching 
l)oth German and F^nglish. Brother 
lieaver held a meeting at White Oak. All 
these meetings were blest with good 
results Many others, which we have 
not the space to speak of, were held. 



OUR COI.LEGE TiMEvS. 



Keystone Literary Society. 

The Keystone Literary Society is a well 
organized body and receives the en- 
couragement and direction of the faculty. 
New students are especially urged to join 
the society, as a literary training is so 
valuable in overcoming the every day 
difficulties of life. 

The chief features of the programme 
are music. recitations, impromptu 
speeches, debate and the reading of origi- 
nal paper. 

Recitations were delivered by the fol- 
lowing: Misses Fogelsanger, Buckwalker, 
Staufler, Kline, Little and Diffenbaugh, 
all of whom are pleasing reciters. 

Impromptu speeches were given by 
Miss Mary Hess, Mr. Chas. Shoop and 
Prof. Ober. 

The following have served as president 
since tiie opening of the Fall Term: Mr. 
Herr, Chas. Shoop, James Breitigan fnd 
I. E. Shoop. 

The secretaries were: Misses Stayer, 
Kline, Wolgemuth and Fogelsanger. 

Many of the questions were good ones 
and created some little excitement, es- 
pecially the following: Resolved, That it 
is better to have loved and lost than nev- 
er to have loved at all. 

Resolved, That Virginia did more to 
promote the American Revolution tiian 
Massachusetts. 

Some of thii members of the faculty 
took part in the debating of these quest- 
ions, which made them all the more in- 
teresting. M. B. H. 



Lancaster Children's Day. 

On Ni)vend)er 15, a day cold and damp, 
rainy and then snow, was held the Child- 
ren's Day Services in Lancaster. Despite 
the weather, the attendance was good. 
The part taken by a number of children, 
and other members of the Sunday school 
was very interesting. Addresses were 
given by Brethren Taylor, Sanger, Beahm 
and Wenger. Preaching services in the 
afternoon, and love feast in the evening. 
For many reasons the day will not soon 
be forgotten. 



Three Addresses. 

During one week recently, we had three 
prominent men with us from distant sec- 
tions of the country First was brother 
M. D. Earlv, fiom Elgin, who gave us an 
inspiring talk. Later, brother E. H. 
Hess of Windom, Penna., evangelist of 
the River Brethren Church. His address 
was thoughtful, appropriate and was re- 
ceived gratefully. Lastly, we enjoyed 
the presence of Dr. Spangler, who for 
twenty years has been a worker and 
prime factor in Ursinus College. The 
Doctor, in his address is very pleasing in 
manner, and evinces at every turn, the 
marks of high culture and scholarship. 
He magnified the abundant opportunity 
which a small college furnishes, and the 
great advantages a person has who is rais- 
ed on the farm. A person being reared 
on the farm comes in contact with the 
elements of science, of education in gen- 
eral. To be raised on the farm furnishes 
the finest opportunities for success in fu- 
ture life; since there is no other single op- 
portunity which touches so nany sides of 
human nature, from so impressive and 
practical a manner. 

All these addresses were listened to 
with interest and they will evidently 
prove very helpful to our student body. 
We are always glad to have friends 
with us, and to have them give us some- 
thing pointed and rich, truthful and prac- 
tical. 



New Minister. 



An interesting and important Council 
Meeting was held in the Brethren 
Church of Elizabethtown, December 15th. 
An election was iield for a minister, and 
the lot fell upon our dear Brother, H. K. 
Ober, whom we earnestly pray, may be- 
come very efficient in the ministration of 
the Word. Brethren J. H. Kline and D. 
C. Reber were advanced from the first 
degree of the ministry to the second by 
virtue of having demonstrated faithful- 
ness and efficiency in the first degree. 
Elder Longenecker ofiiciated. 



OUR COLLKGlv TIMES. 



Locals. 

I'.V ti. H. I.. 

Prof. Sanger spent November 3r(l at 
Derry Church, where he add rei-seil a Sun- 
day school meetinj?. 

Solomon E. Meyer, of Fre<lericksbur», 
Lebanon county, a former student has en- 
rolled for the Winter Term. 

Samuel Hess, one of the first year's 
students is employed as a teacher in War- 
wick township, Lancaster county. 

Miss Etfie Shank, a younjr student, a 
teacher in Dauphin county, is d(tin<; good 
work. Her patrons appreciate her work. 

C. H. Rider, a student of the Fall Term, 
returned to Salanira to work at his trade. 
He expects to return next fall and stay 
the whole year. 

Misses Mary Lentz and Mary Merkey, 
of Hemlin, Lebanon county, who enroll- 
ed at the opening of the Winter Term, are 
enjoying school life. 

Rufus P. Bucher, who of late resumed 
his work at College, spent Sabbath, De- 
cember 11 at J. H. Breitigan's home near 
Petersburg, Pa. 

Misses Mary and Minnie Heisey, both 
teachers of West Donegal township, are 
taking Saturday work at the College un- 
der Prof. Sanger 

Prof H. K. Ober's classes in natural 
science are enjoying the work and mak- 
ing good progress. 

Nathan Martin, '05, assistant superin- 
tendent of the Ober Sunday school, re- 
ports the close of the work on Christmas. 

Mr. John B. Henry, '04, is employed 
in Engle's store at Rheems. 

Others that enrolled at the opening of 
the Winter Term, are H. K. Eby, Amos 
Geib, J. Z. Herr, jr., H. C. Keller, Jos- 
eph Landis, Henry Hollinger, and D. K. 
Marks. 

Our president, I. N. H. Beahm, spent 
the holiday vacation at Walter's Sanita- 
rium, Prof. H. K. Ober at his home at 
Mastersonville, Prof. Sanger at his home 
in Virginia, Mies Myer at her home in 
Bareviile and Prof. Davis flown South. 



Dr. D. C. Reber, our registrar, spent 
Christmas in Berkt- county, at his home. 

Annie Crouse, of Berks county is assist- 
ing in basement work. 

Sisters Hertzler and Reber, by virtueof 
contributions from friends, received nice 
Christmas presents. 

Several membersof tlie College Faculty 
visited W. G. Baker's school. Good re- 
ports. 

About all students enjoyed Christmas 
at home. J. H. Stayer expects to bring 
his sister Eliza on Januarv 2. 



The Lower Cumberland Congregation. 

Your Editor visited this congregation 
in October and enjoyed the love feast at 
the old church with the saints of this 
historic community. 

Brother Isaac [?arto is the bishop in 
charge, assisted by Brethren Landis and 
Beelman. The other ministers are Breth- 
ren Mohler, Murphy, Ivehmer and Holl- 
inger. The last named is now in Cali- 
fornia where it is expected he will exer- 
cise his gooil talent efficiently in the pro- 
mulgation of the Word. 

The first brethren that came into Cum- 
berland county were Adam and Martin 
Brandt about the year 1772. The churdi 
was organized in 1826. Daniel Boiling 
was onlained the first elder. The history 
of the church will be found in the Breth- 
ren's Almanac for 1905. The annual 
meeting of 183(5 was held in this place. 

These facts were given by Brother 
Landis. 

Good Feeling 

Teacher and students have worked 
liard. All manifest a line feeling toward 
each other and the school. "Let brother- 
Iv love continue." 



January 2, class work opens as usual. 



This Bible Term in the College, comes 
but once a year. If you missed it last 
vt-ar, don't ndss it this vear. 



ID. EC. ]V^.A.I^TI2>T 

Clothing and Gent's Furnishings 

Centre Square, Elizabethtown, Pa. 



A. W. Martin 

COAL, WOOD, GRAIN 
FLOUR and FEED 

Telephone. 

Eli^abethtown^ - Pa* 

JACOB FISHER 

Watchmaker g Jeweler 

spectacles and Eyeglasses 
Fitted. 

Centre Square. Elizabethtown, Pa. 

BALMER'S BAKERY 

Choice Breads 

Rolls and Cakes 

OF ALL KINDS. 
8. MARKET ST. ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

J. C. HEIN'S 

Shaving f Haircutting 

P A K, L O K, 
S. Market St. Elizabethtown, Pa. 



Hornafius' Cafe 

OYSTERS in eyery style. 

ICE CREAN, 

SODA WATER. 

Fine Line of Confections always on hand 

MEALS AT ALL HOURS 
J. G. STAUFFER 

Manufacturer and dealer in 

Flour, feed, Grain, Salt, 
Lumber aQd Wood. 
Telegraph Poles a Specialty. 



Local and Long Distance Phone. 



Elizabethtown, 



Pa. 



MAIL ORDERS 

and inquiries will receive prompt attention 



Bibles, Testaments, 
Religious Books and 
Sunday School Supplies 



G. N, Falkenstein, 

Books, Stationery and School Supplies, 
Elizabethtown, Pa. 

HARRY MILLCR 
CABINET MAKER AND UNDERTAKER 

FULL LINE OF FURNITURE. 

S. Market St. Elizabethtown, Pa. 



THE I 

A. DIssinger Store 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

General Merchandise. 

The Store that is not pleased unless you are. 

Watch our Bargain Counters during Jan. and Feb. 

J.HARRY BRUBAKER, 

Proprietor. 



GEO. D. BOGGS, 

DEALER IN 

STOVES, RANGES. 
HOUSEFURNISHING GOODS. 

and a full line of 

HARD W^ ARE 

Call to see us, we will supply your wants. 
S. Market St. Elizabethtown, Pa. 







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CONTRACTOR and BUILDER 

COAL, FEED, GRAIN, 
LUMBER and STONE 



Elizabethtown, 



Pa. 



Page Wire Fence a Specialty. 
inAR.Ld Il^iPI_.BlylEKrXS 

AGENTS FOR 

New Holland Gasoline Engines, Universal 
Plows, Grain Drills, Owego Wagons, etc. 

Elizabethtown, Pa. 

H* S* Hottenstein 

CABINET-MAKER 

AND UNDERTAKER 

A full line of FURNITURE always on 
liand. Call to see me. My lines will 
please you. Undertaking carefully at- 
tended to. 

Elizabethtown, Pa. 




WEAVER 



Organs 
Pianos 



EASY TO OPERATE 
HARD TO WEAR OUT 

Write for Catalogues and Prices to the 

LANCASTER W^AREROOMS 

ass HJAST ICII'Ta ST. 

WEAVER ORGA/N 5c PIA/NO COMPA/Ng. 

All the New^s in the 
BLIZABETHTOWN CHRONICLE 

ONLY THE BEST JOB PRINTING. 

STUDENTS and PROFESSORS 

as well ae other people will be made to feel at home when they come to our store. 
J. N. OLM/EILER, the leading Clothier and Men's Furnisher. 

ELIZABETHTOWN. PA. 



Agent for Lebanon Steam Laundry. 



ANGKOR SPRING AA^AGON W^ORKS 




H. H. NISSLEY, Prop. Manufacturers of 

BUSINESS WAGONS AND DEALERS IN PLEASURE VEHICLES OF MODERN LESIGNS 

W. HIGH STREET. ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



A. BUCH'S SONS CO. 

Manufacturers of the Famous 

EAGLE LAWN SWING 

You want one of these "home beautifiers''. 
Write for prices and catalogue. 

LAND ROLLERS, WHEEL- 
BARROWS, STEEL AND CAST 

IRON TROUGHS, a fullUne of up-to-date foundry articles. 
Corn Shellers, 



There is no better sheller made 
than our 




No. 3, 



ONE-HOPPER, RIGHT HAND SHELLER. 

with cob separator and sieve, as 

shown in the accompanying 

cut. Weight 125 lbs. 



No. 7, 



A TWO-HOPPER. LEFT HAND SHELLER, 

furnished with adjustable shaker ^. 
for hand or power use. 
Weight 280 lbs. 





We manufacture the 

Wooden Stave 

and 

Steel Face 

LAND ROLLERS 

They are built like all 
our goods are, for service. 



Both Phones. Elizabeth to wn, Pa. 



bg«fee©ef^:&e&&&&&€ig'&&:&&&&g!gi&#:&g^-&fi€;e&g«&fe&6€«-6fefeefe«^« 



Hi 



ELIZABETHTOffH HCIAKGE BANK 

i 1 

I Capital - - $50,000,00 § 

I Surplus and Profits $25,000,00 I 

- 1 

^ Transacts a general banking business. W 

g Issues interest bearing Certificates of Deposit. fi 

S OFF'ICBJK.S I 

^ Jot. H. Rider, President. J. H. Eshelman, Cashier ^ 

^ A. R. Forney, Vice President I. H. Stauffer, Teller. § 

f DIK.BOTOR,S i 

rig 1^ 

fJoa. H. Rider, Isaac Wealand, W 

Josiah Foltz, Henry E. Landis, S 

^ Abraham R. Forney, Allen A. Coble, 5» 

w Jos. G, Heisev, H. J. (iish, ^ 

g Dr. H. K. Blo'ugh, Amos C. Fridy, g 

S Dr. A. M. Kalbach. ^ 



WE MOST CORDIALLY INVITE YOU 

To Visit Us in Our Store 

N. E. CORNER, CENTRE SQUARE, ELIZABETHTOWN 

We always strive to give prompt attention to your wants in our lines of 

Dry Goods, Notions, Clothings Boots. Shoes, 
Groceries, Queensware, Etc. 

Spring Goods will interest you soon in our Store 
We are ever ready to meet all Honorable Competition. 

Soliciting your patronage, we are ever ready to accommodate you promptly 

HERTZLER BROS. & CO. 



W. S. SMITH, Pres. B. G. GROFF, Vice Pres. H. C. LEWIS, Cashier. 

Elizabethtown National Bank 

General Accounts Solicited. Interest paid 
oi) Special Deposits. Safe Deposit Boxes in 
Steel, Burglar-Proof Vault, for rent. 



D I -R ECTORS 



W. S. SMITH 
B. G. GROFF 
E. C. GINOER 



PETER N. RUTT 
EM'L DEMMY 
J. S. RISSER 



AMOS G. COBLE 
E. E. COBLE 
B. L GEYER 



tf«««»»»»«»«««««»«««i»«»««««ftft»»»«»»a»»««««««»«»««««««»««» 



JACOB D. F^IDER 

Printings Dcsinging, 

Engraving; and 

Steel Die Stamping 



Both 'Pbooes. 20 NORTM QUEEN STREET. 



Oor College Times 



^ ^ 



Cli^aktljtotDn College, 

€U3aliet|)totpn, ]0a. 



«|S «|6 ^ 



MARCH, 1905 





C O N T 


E N T S 




A Fixed Purpose 


. 


2 


Neighboring Preachers 


7 


Bible Term 


- 


5 


Principles - . - 


5 


Common Sense 


- 


2 


Physical Culture 


6 


Editorials 


- 


4 


Ready for You - 


2 


Elder J. G. Royer 


- 


7 


Spring Term Announcement - 


1 


Elder Wieand 


- 


7 


Social Culture and Co-Edu- 




For Honest Folks 


- 


3 


cation 


8 


Important Truths 


- 


6 


The Literary Society 


2 


Keystone Literary Society 


6 


The Night Before Vacation 


3 


Mathametical Abilities of a 




The New Chapel 


5 


Cigarette 


■ 


5 


To the Front • 


8 



J. lA- KUJHOSr, Jr. 
CHOICE BREAD AND CAKES. 

Weddings and Parties Supplied with fancy Calces at Short Notice. 
S. IbdA.Ji^'KL'BlT ST. EJIjIZABEJI^HTOWN, FA.. 



Hoist's Restaurant 

All Flavors of 

Ice Cream Soda Water 
Full Line of Confections 

Centre Square. 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

E. E. COBLE 

OPTICIAN AND JEWELER 



Centre Square. 



Elizabethtown, Pa. 




Coal 

Grain 

Flour 

Feed 

Paving Stone 

Building Stone 

Ballast^} Lime and 

Farm Impkments. 

Phone No. 6I2A, Rhcems, Pa. 



NOW 

is tl^e time to place 
your order for a WiQter 
Suit or Overcoat. 

You will be as glad of 
buying as I am of selling. 

DAVIS, The Tailor, 

Elizabethtown, Pa. 
ISAAC R- HERR 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

Laaoester Office, 33 North Dnke Street- 

January 

AND 

February 

are usually looked upon 
as dull months for the 
merchant, but not so with 
us. When the "Holiday 
Rush" is over, we find 
many 

Remnants and 

Odds and Ends 

which we will reduce in 
price. We invite you to 
visit our store frequently 
and takfe advantage of the 
bargains offered. 

S. P. ENGLE, ^"'.'."•L'-r"- 



0m College Cime0. 



'^Wisdom is the Principal Thing.'''' 



Vol. I. 



Elizabethtown, Pa.. March, 1905. 



No. 6. 



SPRING TERM ANNOUNCEMENT. 

The spring term of Elizabethtown Col- 
lege opens on March 20 and continues 
thirteen weeks. As the class work is en- 
tirely reorganized at the opening of this 
term, special advantages are offered to 
those who wish to prepare for teaching, 
as well as to those who leave the public 
schools and want to take up advanced 
studies or to review others. 

Faculty. 

The faculty consists of seven capable 
and experienced teachers, assisted by sev- 
eral tutors. During the present year 
three teachers — all graduates — were added 
to teach instrumental music, commercial 
branches and languages. 

Departments. 

Pedagogical. — This department is reg- 
ularly maintained and offers a three 
years' course. During the spring term 
President Beahm will conduct a class in 
the Elements of Pedagogy for the benefit 
of those who expect to be examined by 
the County Superintendent. For those 
teachers who wish to pursue advanced 
work in pedagogy and academic studies 
there will be good advantages offered also. 

English Scientific. — Classes in all the 
common school studies will be formed 
suitable to needs of those coming from 
the public schools. Classes in Civil Gov- 
ernment, Algebra, American Literature, 
Physical Geography, Higher Arithmetic, 



Botany, Etymology, Chemistry, Drawing, 
and Zoology will be conducted. 

College Preparatory. — During this 
term classes in Ca?sar, Cicero, Latin Ele- 
ments, Roman History, Greek Elements, 
Anabasis, Solid Geometry, Trigonometry, 
and German are offered to persons wish- 
ing to prepare for college. This work is 
in charge of two college graduates. 

Commercial. — Three teachers are re- 
quired to carry on this department, which 
offers classes in the following studies : 
Bookkeeping, Commercial Arithmetic, 
Shorthand, Typewriting, Banking, etc. 

Music. — This department offers daily 
instruction in the rudiments of vocal 
music free to all r^-gular students. Also 
excellent instruction is given on organ 
and piano at usual prices. 

Expenses. 

Tuition, per week . .. .. $ 1 00 

Of Day Students, per term 16 00 

Of Boarding Students, per term. 55 00 

Additional Information. 

The record of the school since its or- 
ganization has inspired confidence in 
school boards, educators and the com- 
mercial world, so that our students and 
graduates readily secure positions. If you 
are looking for a good school come to 
Elizabethtown and examine our College. 
Write at once for a catalogue and engage 
a room as early as possible. All inquiries 
will be cheerfully answered upon applica- 
tion to The PtEGISTRAR. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES. 



The Keystone Literary Society. 

The Keystone Literary Society lias 
achieved a fair degree of eminence al- 
ready, and her prestijje will (lonl)tless be 
manifested in a still more pleasing and 
powerfnl manner. Every student sho'ild 
resolve within himself to be a faithful 
member of the Literary Society. Indeed, 
the schooling of »uch a work is all but 
invaluable. The tendency is, in appear- 
ing before the public from time to time, 
to put one in possession of himself, to 
make him master over his own powers, 
as almost nothing else will do. Say 
within your own mind before you arrive 
at the College, "I expect tp be a member 
of the Literary Society." If you cannot 
write like a Shoop, or speak like a Gar- 
man, just do what you can. For by such 
method these men have gained their effi- 
ciency. Join the Society! Be faithful in 
every particular! Be patriotic! Contend 
for youi' rights! Grow strong by grappling 
with the strongest minds in the organi- 
zation. 

[Crowded out of September issue.] 

Common Sense. 

Some people have an idea that educa- 
tion and common sense are two very 
different things. Every well educated 
man has common sense. Every common 
sense person has a lot of good education. 
What is common sense? It has been well 
defined as sense about common things, 
and it does seem that common sense is 
very «)iconmion sense. Education may 
be too technical, it may be too theo- 
retical, as we have it in some of the insti- 
tutions of to-day. But while Elizabeth- 
town College is endeavoring to be techni- 
cal and liberal in her views of education 
and in her efforts, she is steadfastly de- 
termined to make education as practical 
as possible. We believe in good book 
learning saturated through and through 
with the good old-time common sense. 
That religion which is not reducible to 
practice is scarcely worth having. Such 



is true of education. Our School presses 
the common .sense side of educational life 
as well as the other. Both are necessary. 



A Fixed Purpose. 

A fixed purpose is invaluable in every 
department of human effort, and this is 
especially true in college work, if the stu- 
dent would succeed. With a fixed pur- 
pose in mind, followed by a determined 
effort, all will bring a rich reward. 

We hope that each student will come 
saturated with the idea that he will make 
the very best possible use of every mo- 
ment of his time. Some people get the 
idea that they may waste time in school 
and it will hardly be found out; but in 
school life, as everywhere else, work will 
tell. "There is no excellence without 
great labor." Set your aim high. Look 
at it steadfastly. Keep pressing onward. 



We want 200 new subscribers again 
for "Our College Times." Those of you 
who have not subscribed, do so now. 
Those who have subscribed already, 
please solicit others. Our paper has no 
personal interest. Its interest is the in- 
terest of the College. Everything done 
to help "Our College Times" is so much 
done to help the College work. 

Ready for You. 

We are looking forward with pleasure 
to the opening of next Term, March 20. 
A number of the old faces are expected 
to be present and we trust a goodly num- 
ber of new ones will appear. Every one 
will receive a hearty welcome on College 
Hill. 

Ever remember that time is fleeting 
And that school days are goldendays. 
So use your time that each setting sun 
May view some moral improvement in 
your character. 

Barb.\r.\ We.wer. 



OUR COI.I.EGE TIMES. 



For Honest Folks. 

Occasionally it is wise to devote some 
time to introspection, to self-examination. 
Self-examination should be done wisely 
and in the proper spirit, and during those 
periods when we have put ourselves on 
the witnevss stand do not forget the things 
of most importance. Suppose you try a 
few of these questions on the witness: 

I. What am I here for? 
2 Of what use am I ? 

3. What is success? 

4. Am I a success? 

5. Why not? 

6. Do I cumber the earth? 

7. Did I ever have an original, useful 
thought? 

8 Who does my thinking for me? 

9 Am I in a rut? 

10. What is my personal opinion of my- 
self? 

II. What do my friends think of me? 

12. If I should die to-night, would any- 
one remember me in kindness in six 
months? 

13. Did I ever add to the sum of earth's 
happiness? 

14. Is my disposition agreeal)le? 

15. Do I ever try to improve my char- 
acter? 

16. Am I better or worse than last 
year? 

• 17. Am I progressing intellectually? 

18. Are my habits of life such that I 
can reccommend them to other people? 

19. Am I a hypocrite? 

20. Have I the courage of my convic- 
tions? 

21. What are my weak points? 

22. Do I overeat? 

23. Do I control my appetites, or are 
they my masters? 

24. Do I control my temper? 

25. Am I fit to control anything? 

26. What has the future in store for me? 

27. Would I go out of my way to do a 
kind act if I knew I would never receive 
any benefit therefrom? 

28. Have I wit enough to intelligently 
care for children? 



29. Do I know enough about my body 
to take proper care of it? 

30. If my body was a machine, could 
I pass an examination as engineer to take 
charge of it? 

31. Do I dare to answer the above 
questions truthfully to myself? 

Get yourself in a corner and admit 
honestly and fairly that you haye a bad 
habit or a fault, and it will be easy to ex- 
terminate the same. 
Learn to say, "I was wrong." 
Selected by 

E.MMA G. Young, 

Walter's Park, Pa. 

The Night Before Vacation. 

What an evening ! Scenes indescribable, 
thoughts inexpressible ! Here and there 
one falling out of line and marching to- 
ward the same goal — home, some perhaps 
never to return. Others, loathe to leave 
their associates, linger till the morning, 
when the inevitable brings the parting 
time. 

What a night! Sleep has deserted us 
and we lie in our beds reviewing the past 
and contemplating the future. What 
changes have we made? What improve- 
ments will we make? Have we been 
successful in our school work ? These 
are some of the questions that naturally 
arise in our minds. By "successful" we 
do not mean having pleased our teachers 
and passed our studies. That is good, 
even essential, but unless our conscience 
tells us that we have done our best, we 
have not been successful to the highest 
degree. Self mastery is the best evidence 
of success. Have we learned to ma.ster 
ourselves — our desires, our tongues, and 
especially our minds? If we have, suc- 
cess is insured. 

Are we better than when we came to 
Elizabethtown College? Have we tried 
to make our fellow students happy and 
better? If we have, we can go iiome with 
the satisfaction that the time spent here 
was well spent. I. E. S. 

[Too late for January mimbor.] 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES. 



€>ur College Ctmeg. 

EDITORIAL STAFF. 

EDITOR IN CHIEF : 
I. N. H. BEAHM. 

ASSOCIATE editors: 
D. C. REBER, I. E. SHOOP, ELIZABETH MEYER 

special editors : 
Local Editor, - - - GEO. H. LIGHT 

Society Editor. - - MARY B. HESS 

business management: 
Managing Editor and Business Manager, 

H. K. OBER 
associates : 
J. Z. HERR. ELMER RUHL 



Get ready for the Spring Term. 



Our College Times is published bi-monthly. 
Subscription price (six numbers) 2.5 cents, single 
copy 5 cents. 



New building. 



The Spring Term 



What can I do for the new Vmilding? 



Yes, the Spring Term opens Monday, 
March 20 



Of course, we look for you to attend the 
Spring Term or to send a substitute. 



Unkind criticism always means one or 
both of two things, — lack of sympathy or 
lack of understanding. 



Prof. Ober will teach a class next spring 
in Botany. He proposes to "make things 
snap," here as elsewhere. 



The common term "snap" expresses a 
strong modern idea. Enrol for the Spring 
Term and help to make it snap. 



Honest criticism may fall heavily and 
vigorously. It is open and frank, how- 
ever. It seeks not self-gratification. 



E. S. Bell recently visited us and paid 
two subscriptions to "Our College Times." 
Do thou likewise! Come again, Brother 
Bell. 



"Fall in line or move" is a motto 
which flavors of the Savior's wonls: "A 
Kingdom divided against itself can not 
stand." 



Our managing editor. Prof. Ober, is 
anxious to raise the subscription list of 
our lively little .Journal up to that num- 
ber which will entitle us to enter as sec- 
cond class mail. Read his stirring appeal 
elsewhere. Please lend a helping hand. 
We thank you for past favors and ask for 
more. 



The class for the Spring Term in Ele- 
ments of Pedagogy may vary in text and 
method somewhat from last year. You 
may, however, look for a lively and help- 
ful time. The work will be practical 
rather than technical, leaving the more 
scientific and more theoretic for some 
other occasion. Fundamental ideas and 
burning questions will be vigorously han- 
dled. For interest and profit on such 
work, join the class. Do it promptly. 



Dear Reader: As soon as we have 500 
regular paid up subscribers, the Post 
Office Department will allow us to enter 
Our College Times as second class mail 
matter. This will save us considerable 
in postage. Will not each one of you 
help us to accomplish this? The sub- 
sc'iption price is only 25 cents for one 
year and it will not take much effort on 
your part to send us at least one or two 
new subscriptions. Please help us to 
accomplish this. h. k. o. 

Act vigorously on Prof. Ober's appeal 
for more subscribers. See club rates! 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES. 



The winter term enrollment is 85. 
Last year it was 62. 

Dr. H. K. Blongh of our town is n^ak- 
ing himself felt in the Legislature. His 
Bill which he had passed against school 
"hazing" is a good one. It is sound, 
progressive. 



The Physical Culture committee, and 
leading students are much interested in 
giving right direction to bodily exercise 
They will keep in view the interest of the 
College and proper exercises. 



The New Chapel. 

In January, the trustees in session took 
steps towanls erecting a new building in 
behalf of the growing interest of the 
school. Brother Ziegler is appointed so- 
licitor. Brethren Hertzler and Beahm 
will assist. The encouragement is good. 
We praise God for the prospect, and pray 
for abundant success. Liberality and 
hard work are needed. 



Our number is still growing, Mr. J. M. 
Eilinger from .Vlt. Hope, Pa., enrolled as 
a student on the 13th of Febraarv. 



Prof. C. S. Davis was called to his 
home on business. He was al)sent almost 
a week Ail were glad to see him back. 

G. H. L. 



Boother Jessie Ziegler, president of 
the Board of Trustees, preached an ex- 
cellent sermon in the College on the 
evening of February 8. o. h. l. 



The following who were among our 
number this term have taken positions 
now: Messrs. J. H. Breitigan, J. M. Mil- 
ler, Ira G. Myers, Misses Elizabeth 
Kline and Anna Difienbaugh. g. h. l. 



Principles. 

1. Organization is an essential condition 
of life and growth. 

2. In an organized body, every one has 
his function and must perform that func- 
tion well in order to complete harmony 
and growth. 

3. To avoid friction and trouble and to 
facilitate the work, every one must know 
his place and keep it. 

4 There is no formation of strong char- 
acter without stern discipline. 

5 The bei-t discipline is that which one 
administers under wise direction of him- 
self. 

6. The teacher who. does not appreciate 
discipline and its effect, and also who is 
not viilling to be disciplined, is hardly 
capable to discipline otheis. Obedience 
is father to Mastery. Servitude is father to 
Commanding. The greatest to command 
is the best in obedience. As a rule, the 
greatest kicker is the greatest law-breaker. 
I. N. H. B. in College Manual. 



Bible Term. 

The Bible work of three weeks in Jan- 
uary was full of interest. Good results. 
The entire enrollment was 332. A goodiv 
number of these were ministers, Sunday 
School superintendents, Sunday School 
teachers, etc. 

Brother Royer's illness was bridged 
over nicely, and the work went on with 
scarcely a break. Brethren Ziegler, Moh- 
ler, Beahm and Hertzler substituted each 
a sermon Brother Royer's preaching 
was rich and full. Six promising young 
people came out on the Lord's side. May 
they prove faithful! 



Mathematical Abilities of a Cigarette. 

"I am not much of a mathematician," 
said the cigarette, "but I can add toman's 
nervous troubles, I can subtract from his 
physical energy, 1 can multiply his aches 
and pains, 1 can divide his mental powers, 
1 take interest from his work and dis- 
count his chances for success." 

Literary Echo. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES. 



Keystone Literary Society. 

Among the several things which aiiii to 
the fame of Eliz-ahethtown Collpire is the 
Keystone Literary Sodet_v. Judging from 
tt"e interest which all its members mani- 
fest in the work, we must admit that its 
motto (Excelsior) is no misnomer. 

Public meetings are held in the Chapel 
every Friday night, except durinj; Bible 
Term, when the meetings are held in the 
afternoon. The Program Committee al- 
ways arranges good, spicy programs, 
which are much appreciated by the So- 
ciety and its visitors. We generally have 
large au<liences, but wish to make special 
mention of the large audiences during 
Bible Term. 

The Society is continually increasing in 
numbers, and we hope the day is not very 
far distant when another society will be 
organized. 

A n'^w feature of thr- Society is, ladies 
filling the presidential chair, which speaks 
well for the zeal and interest they show 
in the work. Miss Buckwalter, '05, is 
now ably filling that position. Miss 
Hartman is secretary. 

The music, under the direction of Miss 
Good and Dr. Reber, deserves special 
mention. The Glee Club. Ladies' Chorus, 
and Mixed Chorus render some very ex- 
cellent selections 

The Society is anxious to have the Li- 
brary increased, and the readers of "Our 
Times" would greatly please us by do- 
nating some good books. 

M. B. H. 



Physical Culture. 

The boys and girls are not allowing 
themselves to be defeated in the matter 
of physical exercise, simply because they 
do not have an equipped gymnasium. 

With few exceptions, each morning and 
each evening they take cold air baths by 
briskly walking toward town. They all 
realize that even only a few minutes spent 
in rapid walking in the open air arouses 
the entire functional systeu) to increased 
activitv which could not be supplanted 



by any equal amount of indoor exercise. 
During these walks the students often 
forget about the dignity that some peo- 
ple think ought to belong to "college 
folks," and go back to childhood days; a 
snow-ball battle follows, riooks are for- 
gotten, pessimistic thoughts are V)anished, 
the common object of all is to so direct 
the mi.s.«ile as to get the greatest amount 
of snow down the neck. As a result 
every organ of the body is benefitted. 
All the depurating organs of the bodv are 
aroused to increase*! activity. The blood 
is cleansed of impurities, the eyes become 
clearer, the complexion is improved, and 
the glow of health can alwavs be seen as 
they mount the college stejjs on their re- 
turn, y s. n. 



Importiint Truths. 

1. Every student is a anise The teacher 
is but an occasion. 

2. Every educative act is of self-effort. 

3. Every teacher's direct work is 
summed up in two words — iiispiratiini 
and dlrrction. 

4. Character is the result of heredity, 
environment and volition. 

5 Character is measured by habit. 

6. The formation of habit is education. 

7. All education is habit-forminor. 

8. True education is the formation of 
right habit in every <lirectioii. 

9. True education is the perfection of 
the individual to the end of perfect 
service. 

10. The perfect indiviilnal is wise, lov- 
ing and righteous. Perfectly he knows. 
Perfectly he feels Perfectly he does. 

I. N. IT. B. in College Manual. 



The true teacher makes two cardinal 
impressions upon the student : I. He 
makes him feel little, or needy. 2. He 
makes him feel growth. 

The true teacher seeks to keep in the 
mind of the student tiie idea of conscious 
need. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES. 



Neighboring Preachers. 

During our Bible Term we had a lot of 
very effectual preaching by a number of 
our Brethren who live at various distan- 
ces from the Colleo;e. 

"Salvation by Grace" was the theme of 
the sermon delivered by S. M. Staufferof 
Green Springs, Pa. Brother Stauffer had 
jjiven the subject much thought, and 
was largely in the spirit. He handled 
the subject with much interest. "Work 
out your own salvation" was a subject 
treated by 1. VV. Taylor of Vogansville. 
Brother Taylor was very clear in his con- 
ception of the subject and very careful in 
every statement. The discourse was 
taken down and co])ied by one of the 
students. The editor wishes that this 
might have been done in every case, but 
at the time it could not. H. E. Light of 
Mountville handled the subject "Bible 
Predestination." One good critic said it 
was the best effort he ever heard from 
the speaker. "Plain and Honest Living" 
was handled in a plain and honest way 
by D. M. Eshelman of Mount Joy, Pa. 
Brother Eshelman spoke in German and 
his effort was very interesting and point- 
ed. His pleasant countenance and good 
cheer, always add to the occasion. "The 
Doctrine of Peace" was held forth in a 
very striking and impressive manner in 
another sermon, by John Herr of Myers- 
town, Pa. This was one of Brother 
Herr's most careful efforts, and the Lord 
granted a very impressive and powerful 
effect to follow the service of our dear- 
brother who had so long been ill. This 
was the lirst sermon he had preached for 
months, and he seemed to go into it with 
more readiness and power than usual. 
In the course ot his remarks he laid 
special stress upon being in peace with 
the Church by espousing her cauee, ac- 
cepting her plans, and pressing her 
teachings. 

If there is one place in our district 
where the soundest of preaching ought to 
be done it is in the College, where voung 



men and young women are growing 
stronger, and going out into various fields 
of labor to represent the Church. It is 
most prayerfully hoped that Elizabeth- 
town College be made a power for the 
Church in her doctrines. 

Dear Brethren, we are very thankful 
that you came and labored in our midst. 
In taking upon yourselves these spec'al 
subjects, you gave yourselves to prayer 
and study, and your efforts have been 
made our joy and are greatly appreciated. 
Come again! Be among us. Help us, we 
need your assistance. And to the Breth- 
ren, everywhere, come and help us bear 
our great responsibilities. Stop with us 
whenever you can. 



Elder J. G. Royer. 

Brother Royer of Mount Morris, III., 
spent three weeks at Elizabethtown. As 
a teacher he is rich, ripe and rac)'. As a 
preacher he is thoughtful, very careful in 
his interpretation and application. His 
entire work is fraught with great simpli- 
city, earnestness and vivacity. He made 
lasting impressions on many persons. 

His associations and labors while among 
the College folks and the entire people 
were sweetly and iai-gely appreciated. 
Long live the sage of Mount Morris! 



Elder Wieand. 



During Bible term Brother A. C. Wie- 
and of New York city came to the Col- 
lege and spent four days, preaching in 
the evening and teaching along with 
Brother Royer during the day. 

Brother Wieand' s most excellent work 
and his labors wfre largely appreciated. 
At every turn he evinces scholarship, 
breadth of thought, and marked spirit- 
ual insight. 

He preached several sermons in town 
also. The College will be glad at any 
time to see Brother Wieand again. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES. 



Social Culture and Co-Education. 

Rend in Cullof-'L" ("Imin'l Fut). l'>. 

One of tlie strontrest aii;uinents in favor 
of i-o-ediioation is that it afi'ords advant- 
ages for cnlture in politeness and courtesy 
such as no education of the sexes sepa- 
rately can give. 

Co-education implies more restraint 
than exists where the sexes are apart, 
and rude and uncouth young men will, 
because of the elevating influence of asso- 
ciation with ladies, soon become more re- 
fined and polished in manners. 

In the home, on the farm, in the fac- 
tory, on the street, in the church — almost 
everywhere men and women are thrown 
into one another's company: ami since 
so much of our success in life depends on 
the manner in which men approach 
women, and vice versa, surely the so- 
cial side of our education should not be 
neglected. 

Good manners should be learned in 
the home, but since in many homes this 
training is neglected, the Boarding School 
or-College may do much to remedy this 
neglect. J. G. Holland says, "Children 
reared (brought up) in a home with few 
or no associations, will grow up either 
boorish or sensitively timid. While 
those who are constantly accustomed to 
asocial life from their youth, are educat- 
ed in all its forms and graces without 
knowing it." Hence the importance of 
attending a small College, where young 
people are brought into continued con- 
tact with polite social life. 

In the school the ladies and gentlemen 
meet daily in class rooms and dining 
hall, the latter of which affords excellent 
opportunity for social culture. VJore re- 
straint is necessary here ttian at the 
same place in the home. Gentlemen 
may be very hungry and feel tempted to 
help themselves to food especially pleas- 
ing to their taste, but courtesy tells them 
to serve the ladies first. 

They may meet ladies in the hall or 
library and be tempted to have a pro- 
longed conversation, but expediency tells 



them this cannot well be allowed in the 
school, only on special occasions 

The tiue lady is modest in Mianner, 
and pure ir) character. She is not boister- 
ous or rude, but rather retired and 
refined. She will not make advances, 
or offer suggestions which only a 
gentleman should make or offer. The 
wholesome influence of pure, sweet, no- 
ble womanhood can not be estimated. 

Again, the young lady who is perfectly 
natural, cordial in trreetingall her friends, 
gentlemen as well as la<lies. free in 
conversation when expedient, yet modest 
and refined in all these, is the one \.ho 
is admired, and who will make a success 
in business, social and religious circles. 
Fortunate is the school or the community 
where such types of womanhood are the 
rule and not the exception. 

In school.' for the male sex only, there 
is not much restraint, and habits may be 
formed which will unfit ^ oung men for 
polite ladies' society. And again, in 
schools whose doors are open only to the 
female sex, the restraint may be un- 
reasonble, and the social qualities so nec- 
essary for the future happiness and suc- 
cess of the young ladies are not unfolded, 
and the graces of female ciiaracter fail to 
blossom in the fullness of true woman- 
hood. 

Let us give our boys and girls the ad- 
vantages of the social cnltnre which can 
be had only through co-education. 

ELIZABETH MYER. 



To The Front ! 

The tide is turning atjrainst the "College 
Rowdyism" which exists in so many 
places. College presi<lents like Dr. Eliot, 
and legislatures like Nebraska and Penn- 
svlvania are giving the right jingle to 
such things. Dr. Blough's Anti-Hazing 
Bill has the orthodox ring. Elizabeth- 
town Colletre is right to the front to 
champion this needed reform— to the 
end of true education. Boys, and all, 
join in the good work. 



Clothing and Gent's Furnishings 

Centre Square, Elizabethtown, Pa. 



A. W. Martin 

COAL, WOOD, GRAIN 
FLOUR and FEED 

Telephone. 

EliXabethtown^ - Pa* 

JACOB FISHER 

Watchmaker t Jeweler 

spectacles and Eyeglasses 
Fitted. 

Centre Square. Elizabethtown, Pa. 

BALMER'S BAKERY 

Choke Breads 

Rolls and Cakes 

OF ALL KINDS. 
S. MARKET ST. ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

J, C. HEIN'S 

Shaving i Haircutting 

P» A R, Ij O K, 
S. Market St. Elizabethtown, Pa. 



Hornafius' Cafe 

OYSTERS in eyery style. 

ICE CREAN, 

SODA WATER. 

Fine Line of Confections always on hand 

MEALS AT ALL HOURS 
J. G. STAUFFER 

Manufacturer and dealer in 

Flour, feed, Grain, Salt, 
Lumber aryd Wood. 
Telegraph Poles a Specialty. 



Local and Long Distance Phone. 



Elizabethtown, 



Pa. 



MAIL ORDERS 

and inquiries will receive prompt attention 



Bibles, Testaments, 
Religious Books and 
Sunday School Supplies 



G. N. Falkenstein, 

Books, Stationery and School Supplies, 
Elizabethtown, Pa. 

HARRY MILLER 
CABINET MAKER AND UNDERTAKER 

FULL LINE OF FURNITURE. 

S. Market St. Elizabethtown, Pa. 



THE I 

A. Dissinger Store 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

General Merchandise. 

The Store that is not pleased unless you are. 
Watch our Bargain Counters during Jan. and Feb. 

J.HARRY BRUBAKER, 

Proprietop. 



GEO. D. BOGGS, 

DEALER IN 

STOVES, RANGES. 
HOUSEFURNISHING GOODS. 

and a full line of 

HARD W^ ARE 

Call to see us, we will supply your wants. 
S. Market St. Elizabethtown, Pa. 



Toff 



CONTRACTOR and BUILDER 

COAL, FEED, GRAIN, 
LUMBER and STONE 



GisE s Mcen 




Elizabethtown, 



Pa. 



Page Wire Fence a Specialty. 

AGENTS FOK 

New Holland Gasoline Engines, Universal 
Plows, Grain Drills, Owego Wagons, etc. 

Elizabethtown, Pa. 



H* S» Hottenstein 

GABINET-MAKER 

AND UNDERTAKER 

A full line of FURNITURE always on 
hand. Call to see me. My lines will 
please you. Undertaking carefully at- 
tended to. 

Elizabethtown, Pa. 




WEAVER 



Organs 
Pianos 



EASY TO OPERATE 
HARD TO WEAR OUT 

Write for Catalogues and Prices to the 

LANCASTER AVAREROOMS 

sse BAST K:ii<ra st. 
WEAVER ORGA/N & PIA/NO COMPA/Ng. 

All the Ne^ATs In the 
BLIZABETHTOWN CHRONICLE 

ONLY THE BEST JOB PRINTING. 

STUDENTS and PROFESSORS 

as well as other people will be made to feel at home when they come to our store. 
J. N. OLWEILER, the leading Clothier and Men's Furnisher. 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



Agent for Lebanon Steam Laundry. 



ANCHOR SPRING \A/^AGON W^ORKS 




H. H. NISSLEY, Prop. Manufacturers of 

BUSINESS WAGONS AND DEALERS IN PLEASURE VEHICLES OF MODERN DESIGNS 

W. HIGH STREET. ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 




A. BUCK'S SONS CO. 

Manufacturers of the Famous 

EAGLE LAWN SWING 

You want one of these "home beautifiers"'. 
Write for prices and catalogue. 

LAND ROLLERS, WHEEL- 
BARROWS, STEEL AND CAST 

IRON TROUGHS, a fullUne of up-to-date foundry articles. 

Corn Shellers. 

There is no better sheller made 
than our 

No. 3, 

ONE-HOPPER, RIGHT HAND SHELLER. 

with cob separator and sieve, as 

shown in the accompanying 

cut. Weight 125 lbs. 

No. 7, 

A TWO-HOPPER, LEFT HAND SHELLER, 

furnished with adjustable shaker ^-> 
for hand or power use. 
Weight 280 lbs. 

We manufacture the 

Wooden Stave 

and 

Steel Face 

LAND ROLLERS 

They are built like all 
our goods are, for service. 

Both Phones. Blizabethtown, Pa. 






©&&*€-eg;&gi&fe&g=g;g.e§=6;eteefe 



«» 



Capital - - $50,000,00 
Surplus and Profits $25,000,00 

Transacts a general banking business. 
Issues interest bearing Certificates of Deposit. 



OininiOHlK,S 



Jo$. H. Rider, President. 
A. R. Forney, Vice President. 



J. H. Eshelman, Cashier 
I. H. Stauffer, Teller. 






I3IR,E10T0R.S 

Jos. H. Rider, Isaac Wealand, 

Josiah Foltz, Henry E. Landis, 

Abraham R. Forney, Allen A. Coble, 

Jos. G. Heisey, H. J. Gish, 

Dr. H. K. Blough, Amos C. Fridy, 

Dr. A. M. Kalbach. 







WE MOST CORDIALLY INVITE YOU 



To Visit Us In Our Store 



N. E. CORNER, CENTRE SQUARE, ELIZABETHTOWN 

We always strive to give prompt attention to y6ur wants in our lines of 

Dry Goods, Notions, Clothing, Boots, Shoes, 
Groceries, Queensware, Etc. 

Spring Goods will interest you soon in our Store 
We are ever ready to meet all Honorable Competition. 

Soliciting your patronage, we are ever ready to accommodate you promptly 

HERTZLER BROS. & CO. 



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W. S. SMITH, Pre*. B. G. QROFF, Vic«: PrM. H. 0. LEWIS, Oaihler. 

Elizabethtown National Bank 

General Accounts Solicited. Interest paid 
Of) Special Deposits. Safe Deposit Boxes in 
Steel, Burglar-Proof Vault, for rent. 



D I'R BCTOnS 



W. 8. SMITH 
B. Q. QROFF 
E. 0. GINDER 



PETER N. RUTT 
EM'L OEMMY 
J. S. RISSER 



AMOS a OOBLE 
E. E. OOBLE 
B. L. QEYER 



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«««*«««etfft»««««««*ft«ft««««»«ft«*»«ee«ft#e«»«e«efte«e«»«»eeft 



JACOB D. RIDER 

Printing; Dcsinging, 

Engraving; and 

Steel Die Stamping 



L-KNCKSTER, PA. 

Both 'Pboots. 20 NORTH QUEEW STREET. 



0m College Cimes. 



^'Wisdom is the Principal Thing," 



Vol. II. 



Elizabethtown, Pa., May, 1905. 



No. I, 



General Educational Values. 

BY D. C. REBER. 

The educational world is not agreed at 
this time as to the meaning of general ed- 
urational values. In regard to the at- 
titude of leading educators toward this 
question, some may be characterized as 
enthusiastic and confident, others are 
skeptical and uncertain. "And who 
shall decide when doctors disagree?'' Is 
the expression a mere phantom — a peda- 
gogue's figment, or is there a reality 
couched behind these words? 

A general educational value may be in- 
terpreted as meaning three things: (1) 
That value which more than one study 
can claim, e. g. the development of 
reasoning is claimed both for the study of 
grammar and arithmetic; (2) That value 
which is measured by the extent to which 
a study energizes or develops the child as 
a whole, e. g. real studies impart richer, 
stronger and more permanent incentives, 
stimulate a more varied activity of 
mind, and leave behind more useful 
habits and dispositions than the formal 
or abstract studies; and again (3) That 
value of a study which may be designated 
as liberalizing the mind, liberating the 
genius of the child, giving breadth to the 
mind, freeing it from ignorance and pre- 
judice, leading to a discovery and appre- 
ciation of the individuality of the ideal 
man, equipping the spirit with powers 
and possessions which may be utilzed in 
any pursuit in life. 



Negatively, general educational values 
may be defined by pointing out the cor- 
responding special educational values. A 
special educational value may mean — (1) 
That value which is peculiar to that 
study and which is scarcely attainable 
from any other study; (2) That value 
which may be designated as its informa- 
tional value affording knowledge for 
guidance, and ideas and concepts that 
are necessary to pursue advanced studies 
in the same department of knowledge; 
this value is based on the exercise of a 
certain mental activity to such a degree 
that it is unfitted for a somewhat similar 
activity in another field of investigation; 
and (3) That value denoted by the term 
utilitarian or scientific value, by which 
is meant its usefulness in fitting the pupil 
to earn a livelihood either in industrial 
or professional pursuits. This value se- 
cures intension rather than extension in 
mental development, and produces the 
specialist. Instead of giving scope, it 
limits the mind to narrow channels and 
commercial ends. 

Whether the foregoing distinctions be 
clear and true or not, general educational 
values exclude informational value, utili- 
tarian value, scientific value, instrumental 
value, and include sociological value, 
ethical value, aesthetic value, disciplin- 
ary and cultural value. Educational 
values then may be differentiated on the 
broad consideration of education as a 
means, and as an end, the former giving 
general educational values and the latter, 
special educational values. 



OUR COLLI- GE TIMES. 



Ediu-ation iiiuiit always be a syste- 
matic process consciously ainiinp to lead 
man up to the typical perfection of his 
physical, mental, anrl moral being. The 
ideal aim of education is to cliange the 
natural man into the ideal man. But the 
education of man as an ideal of his kind, 
and of man as an instrument of service 
aie antagonistic. Therefore, education is 
forced to de{)art somewhat from her ideal 
in order to fit man for the practical limi- 
tations under which he lives, yet at the 
same time keep the ideal consciously in 
mind and endeavor to make the condi- 
tions as nearly perfect as possible so that 
as time rolls on, nearer approximations to 
the ideal are made. 

Efhication, teleologically speaking, may 
be divided into four kinds: a general ele- 
mentary education, a liberal education, 
a technical e<1ucation, a f)rofessional edu- 
cation. The first and second comprehend 
education as a means; the third and 
fourth, as an end. 

The modern elementary school endeav- 
ors to afl'ord a curriculum of studies that 
are intended to furnish the general ele- 
mentary education. Its main function 
ideally is to train or form the mind, and 
develop a healthy body; and throughout, 
knowledge is subordinated in importance 
to complete development. The educative 
material serves to in) part the techniques 
of education but more to develop a many- 
sided interest by means of instruction. 
Formation of correct habits of study and 
action are very essential Under the 
severest limitations in life, this amount 
of education is regarded as the child's 
rightful, equipment. And with a short 
apprenticeship, he acquires a technical 
education (e. g. business) for the purpose 
of earning a living. Under more favor- 
aljle conditions, a high school course maj' 
be added to the elementary training for a 
general education. Under such circum- 
stances, the technical course follows the 
course in the high school. 

The modern educational ideal includes 
not onlv the elementarv and secondary 



school education l>ut also the lilieral edu- 
cation afforded by the college, as a broad 
prepiaration for the subsequent duties of 
life. A liberal education aims at the 
ideal of perfect development physically, 
intellectually, socially, and morally. It 
is an education for the sake of the indi- 
vidual's manhood or womanhood without 
regard to any specific use to which the 
knowledge and power may be turned. 
The main function of a liberal educatiiii 
therefore is to realize in man what he is 
potentially, to become conscious of his 
possibilities, and to get self under the 
control of tlie will. Although freedom 
and perfection are the goal of a liberal 
educ tion, nevertheless studies affording 
knowledge and a<'tivities giving a certain 
aniount of technical skill are pursued 
profitably. The characterization of this 
education results from the emphasis being 
place(l on the main purpo.ee with one or 
more subsidiary purposes 

( To be aintwiicd.) 



Sister Ella Royer of near Richland, a 
very devoted Christian, and Brother 
Abram Shaeffer of ElizaV)ethtown, both 
enrolled last Bible Term. Each after a 
very short illness, was called to thCiSpirit 
Land. The remains of both were buried 
on the same day, April 14. Feelings of 
tender sympathy are extended to their 
sad bereavements. But "Blessed are 
they that die in the Lord." 



Physical Culture. 

Professor Ober is Chairman of the 
Physical Culture Committee. He is in- 
spiring the department and shaping it 
into a permanent organization. Much 
can be done in this direction by wisdom. 
The Professor seems to understand this 
point, and is succeeding. 



Commencement week will be a big one 
on College Hill. 



OUR COLLEAE TIMES. 



How Great Are the Benefits of Music? 

For a number of reasons it may be said 
that music is of inestimable value. It 
is very closely allied to the soul, since it 
is one of the avenues through which the 
soul speaks. Hence it has often been 
called the "Language of the Soul." 

And whatever may have been the 
primitive use of music, aside frrm prais- 
ing and worshiping God, it is today used 
both as a science and as an art. Some 
may question if it requires very much of 
either of the science, or of the art, to be 
able to lift a tribute of praise to our 
Creator. 

I answer the above in the following 
manner — Our own soul may perhaps ex- 
press its longings without either of 
these being developed to any great de- 
gree; but I do not believe that the duty 
and responsibility of any individual ends 
with himself. We certainly owe to those 
around us the influence of our voices in 
song just as much as we owe to them our 
counsels and our advice. 

The very fact that Paul says we should 
"sing with the spirit and with the under- 
standing," demands more than a mere 
knowledge of the notation of music. I 
believe that D. L. Moody spoke the 
truth when he said "If all professing 
christians would sing as they ought to 
sing, where there is one christian there 
would be a hundred." This I believe is 
true because it touches us on so many 
different sides. Gluck once said, "Music 
is to soften men down without injuring 
them, and to make them better, and 
more agreeable to their surroundings 
without lowering them." 

Pythagoras said, "Music is the emblem 
of all that is good — good order, good be- 
havior, and decency." Another says, 
"It is at the bottom of all that is true, 
just, and harmonious, and without it the 
beautiful is not possible." 

If the above is true, then without music, 
worship would stale, the Poet's high- 
est power would be blighted; society 
would become a reckless drone. The 



ardor of worship would be minimized, 
and to banish its effects from the home 
would be the death, and burial, of the 
mother of one of her highest factors for 
good. Take away music and its essential 
elements, and soon, too soon, the morals 
and the intellects of the universe will 
have reached a stage of deterioration. 

Sotorichus declares that "Music leads 
to that which is great, beautiful, noble, 
and sublime." He also says, "All states 
that are distinguished for their best laws, 
and government, have the greatest love 
for music." Shakespeare says, "Music is 
love, religion is love, and love is the 
blessed link that binds them together." 

B. F. W AMPLER. 



Yonder. 

"What means that building near the 
west corner of our campus?" "Oh! it is to 
be the cottage home of one of the faculty, 
is it?" Yes, that is Dr. D. C. Reber's 
coming domicile. We are all glad build- 
ing is going on in our immediate com- 
munity, and especially when a neat and 
handsome dwelling is springing up to be- 
come a sacred home spot. Congratula- 
tion to our neighbor and wife in their 
new enterprise! Who will be the next to 
roof some beautiful spot near the College 
campus? A variation in Elizabethtown 
architecture is nicely in order as in any 
other town. Beautiful cottage home! 
Welcome! Thrice welcome! 



District Meeting. 

The District Meeting of Eastern Penn- 
sylvania, or as sometimes called, "The 
District Conference" will be held this 
year in the Ridgely Church, eastern shore 
of Maryland, May 10 and 11. 

Many of our people are looking forward 
with pleasure to attending this meeting 
and visiting among God's people of that 
section. 

The delegates of the Elizabethtown 
Church are, J. H, Kline and H. K. Ober. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES. 



£Dur College Cfines. 

EDITORIAL STAFF. 

EDITOR IN CHIEF : 

I. N. H. BEAHM. 

ASSOCIATE editors: 
D. C. REBER, I. E.SHOOP, ELIZABETH MEYER 

SPECIAL EDITORS : 

Local Editor, - - - GEO. H. LIGHT 

Society Editor, - - MARY B. HESS 

BUSINESS MANAGEMENT : 

Managing Editor and Business Manager, 

H. K. OBER 

ASSOCIATES : 

J. Z. HERR, ELMER RUHL 

Our College Times is published bi-monthly. 
Subscription price (six numbers) 'ih cents, single 
copy 5 cents. 



Commencement June 15! 

We need more Fubscrihers. Read 
brother Bowers' letter, "Go thoii and do 
likewise." 

Dr. 1. N. Johns of Runbury, Pa., author 
of "The Reference Passage Bible," gave 
a copy of the same to the College Library. 
It is much appreciated. It is a good 
work. 

The editor of our Times has been called 
upon to write a number of articles on 
Christian Baptism to appear in the Union 
Bride, (Maryland) Pilot, lie has ac- 
cepted. 

Your Editor was present at the funeral 
of Sister James P. Lehman, who died in 
York, March 20. Brother Lehman has 
the sympathy of many friends of Eliza- 
bethtown and elsewhere. Cruel death 
has often invaded the happy home of 
Brother Lehman. He now has a larger 
family on the other side of the river than 
he has on this side, six dwell in the 
Spirit Land. Sister Lehman lived a de- 
voted and exemplary Christian life. The 
funeral was largely attended and it was 
an occasion of unusual sympathy and 
weeping. The surviving son and daugh- 
ter and father have the prayers of "Our 
College Times." 



Bro.Hertzler's work during Bible Term, 
on (lalatians has been highly spoken of. 
He and brother Paul agree well. 

Short addresses were given in the 
Chapel, April 15, by Brethren Imler, 
Ziegler and Hertzler. On the 11th by 
Prof. Price. 

C. D. Bonsack of Wesiminster, Mary- 
land, paid us a visit April 4. He de- 
livered an address to the teachers and 
students of the College, and friends who 
came in, which was very much appreci- 
ated. 

On Friday, April 8, trustees held an 
important session at the College, mainly 
in the interest of the new College Build- 
ing. These men have taken hold of the 
work properly, and are succeeding en- 
couragingly. They will |)ush it to a 
finish, but it takes a steady purpose, a 
strong grasp, and united effort to plant a 
new building on the College campus. It 
is not done in a day. VV hen it is done, 
however, it is much appreciated. 

Miss Good, our teacher in music, has 
suffered very much of rheumatism. 
Her work is being done until her full re- 
storation, by Professor Wampler, who has 
been making music a specialty for some 
years. Professor Wampler is a native of 
Virginia, but has spent a number Of years 
in the West, Indiana and Iowa, teaching 
music. We regret very much that Miss 
Good has been ill, but are very glad that 
her place is being filled so well by a 
substitute. 

Our Methods class numbers twenty- 
three. Psychology is being taught in a 
brief way, as a preliminary to a more 
careful study of principles and methods 
of teaching. Psychology means hard 
work and lots of it from start to finish. 

No effort is better invested than the 
effort which one invests in the study of 
mind. The mind of the child must ever 
remain the centre of all educational sci- 
ence. So, "Bend to the oar and pull for 
the shore." 



OUR COLIvEAE TIMES. 



This iKsue is No. 1 of volume II. 

Brother B. G. Groflf will hustle the 
new building. 

Look out for full program for Com- 
mencement week. 

The Baccalaureate sermon will be given 
June 11 in chapel 7, P. M. 

Brother H. K. Ober takes his turn in 
preaching. We are much encouraged by 
his efforts. 

Brother Beahm's lecture on the Bible 
at the Brethren chapel 5901 8rd Avenue, 
Brooklyn, was well attended. 

Brother A. C. Wieand is in Europe. 
On his return in autumn, he will enter 
the Bethany Bible School, Chicago. 

The N & W. Railroad Company is 
favoring our people with a 10 per cent, 
rebate on all tickets they sell on Annual 
Meeting account. 

The Brooklyn lovefeast was one of the 
quietest and of sweetest fellowship that 
we have attended in years of time. Some 
sixty communicants. 

Brother Reber preached an interesting 
Easter Sermon in the chapel. We now 
have a sermon each Sunday, which is 
right, on account of the students. 

Brother S. S. Beaver and Sister Weaver 
were recently united in holy matrimony. 
A happier couple is seldom, if ever, seen. 
"Our College Times" joins in joyful 
wishes ! 

A good letter from Brother .lacob Z. 
Herr reports the vanishing of his rheu- 
matic pains, and that he will soon be 
among us again. Encouraging news ! A 
welcome return, brother ! 



An Expert Character Reader. 

Miss Jessie A. Fowler, daughter of the 
late Prof. L. N. Fowler, of England, and 
niece of the famous Prof. O. S. Fowler, 
is now office examiner at the Fowler 
and Wells Compiany, 24 E. 22nd St., New 
York. She is gifted and cultured. Her 
insight into human nature and her power 
to delineate character are strikingly good. 
She discriminates with fine and beautiful 
distinctions. 

Phrenology is becoming quite practical 
and helpful, especially when applied in 
an honest and elevated manner like that 
of Miss Fowler's. 

Your editor called at the Fowler and 
Wells Company April 22. He was cor- 
dially received and was pleased to see 
the work in such competent management 
and to be moving along so nicely. 

Miss Fowler has written up a psychic 
analysis and character reading, or Phre- 
nograph of John D. Rockefeller, which 
will appear in the June number of the 
Phrenological Journal. It is said that 
this article will be reproduced in twenty- 
three newspapers, by special permission. 



Exchange Department. 

Our exchange editor was appointed 
rather late, so when her copy came in, 
this number was already full. Hence, 
we must wait till another issue to open 
formally on our exchanges. 



Our College Field as Seen by the Solicitor. 

When we see our people in the finan- 
cial interest of our work we have a good 
opportunity toguage the real unvarnished 
sentiment in regard to the welfare and 
success of the College. And yet the con- 
viction is forced upon you at times that if 
the College were a dividend paying con- 
cern its friends would be more numerous 
but certainly not more true. 

We are gratified to find such a generjd: 
growing and deepening of interest among 
our friends, and we also have had some 
very pleasant surprises of new friends 
coming to our aid and standing by our 
side in our efforts in behalf of our strong, 
active, bright young people, whose pos- 
sibilities need to be developed and whose 
energies need to be directed. There is a 
large, encouraging field for Elizabethtown 
College. Its prospects are quite hopeful, 
even assuring. Jesse Ziegler 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES. 



Locals. 

Our President, I. N. H. Beahm, Prof. 
H. K. Ober am'. Prof. Elizabeth Meyer 
reprepented Elizabethtown College at 
the association held in Philadelphia by 
the private secondary schools of Pennsyl- 
vania, on February 24. 

Prof. B. F. VVampler, from Iowa, took 
up Mips Good's work here on account of 
her inability. He will stay with us till 
she is able to take up her work again. 

Brn. Geo. Zollers from Indiana, was 
with us during the week beginning Feb- 
ruary 19. He gave us several lectures on 
his experiences on the sea, which indeed, 
w ere very interesting. On February 24 he 
gave us a nice talk on plainness which 
was enjoyed by all. 

Messrs J. Z. Herr and J. H. Saver at- 
tended the funeral of Mr. David Landis' 
father on March 24. 

Sister Barbara Weaver, one of our stu- 
dents of this term was married to Rev. 
Spenser Beaver a few weeks ago. They 
expect to reside in town. 

The class of '05 rendered an excellent 
program on the College campus on Arbor 
Day, (April 14), in the afternoon after 
which they planted an English Walnut 
tree and two Ramblers, one of which be- 
longs to Prof. Beahm. 

The Fourth Anniversary of the Key- 
stone Literary Society was celebrated on 
Friday evening. April 14, A very inter- 
esting program was rendered. One inter- 
esting feature was an address by C. C. 
Ellis, from the State University. 

Mr. Ezra Lehman and Bro. Allen 
Hertzler who finished the commercial 
course here, accompanied by Bro. Willis 
Heisey, left last month for Chicago, and 
other points in the west 

Among those who taught public school 
and are now among our number are the 
following: Misses Minnie Heisey, Minnie 
Ginder, Effie Shank, Mazie Martin, Tillie 
Buser, May Gross, Messrs. Scblosser, 
Baker and Oberholtzer. 



Many of the students spent Easter at 
home. 

A Missionary Reading Circle has been 
organized at the College. 

On the 14th of March Prof. Elizabeth 
Myer attended the funeral of her uncle, 
Mr. Evens, of Lititz. 

Miss Mary Merkey, one of our students, 
was called home on account of her father's 
illness, who died a week later. 



The New Chapel. 

Yes, we are still talking of that new 
chapel. "Talk is cheap," and yet often 
invaluable. But more than talk is being 
done. The new chapel is only a question 
of time, with no hindrances. It is surely 
coming. The trustees have been laboring 
unitedly and vigorously. Their efforts 
have been crowned with success, and the 
new building will go up. 

Many kind hearts and open purses have 
been found. Congratulations to Eliz- 
abethtown College for having such a host 
of generous hearted friends ! There has 
been a very kind response among many 
of the citizens of Elizabethtown. Our 
own people here a::d elsewhere have 
looked this way prayerfully and helpfully. 

We must, however, exercise patience 
for all matters instigated by bodies 
of men, and having considerable 
size, require time. You will have ample 
notice to attend the dedication service. 



From York County. 

Elders Henry Beelman and Levi Mohler 
of York county visited our school in Jan- 
uary. They gave us some very whole- 
some advice. Come again, brethren. 



The Ethics cla.ss is made up of ten 
members. The subject demands close 
thinking. It is with pleasure to note a 
deep interest in such an important branch 
of study. 



OUR COLIvEAE TIMES. 



Anniversary and Tree Planting Exercises. 

Friday, April 14th was a Red Letter 
Day in the history of Elizabethtown 
College. At 3 p. rn. the Class of 1905 led 
by their President and Secretary, Mr. 
Jacob G. Myer, of Lebanon Co., Pa., and 
Miss Lydia Buck waiter, of Lancaster, Pa. 
marched to the Campus, where after 
executing an appropriate literary program, 
they planted a Japan Walnut tree and a 
Crimson Rambler rose as an expression 
of regard for the Alma Mater and as a 
desire to be remembered by her. 

Prof. Ober in a closing address urged 
the members of the class to so live that 
the growth of the tree and the rose just 
planted may be emblematic of their ever 
increasing influence, and strength and 
stability of character. 

Promptly at 7:30 p. m., the Keystone 
Literary Society met in the Chapel to 
celebrate the 4th anniversary of its found- 
ing. 

Mr. S. S. Suinpman of Albright College, 
Myerstown, formerly of Elizabethtown 
College, presided at this meeting. He 
and the Secretary, Mrs. F. W. Groff, '04, 
of Elizabethtown, filled their offices with 
grace and dignity. The President's ad- 
dress of welcome was earnest and inspir- 
ing. 

Miss Minnie Heisey read a carefully 
prepared and instructive essay, entitled, 
"Our Ideals.'" She spoke of different 
kinds of ideals — The ideal farmer, the 
ideal teacher, the ideal home — saying all 
should have before them a high ideal, and 
earnestly strive to reach it. 

The reciter of the evening, Mr. John 
Brinser, of Elizabethtown, recited in a 
pleasing manner, which is peculiarly and 
humorously his own, "Ye Knight of Ye 
Olden Time." 

Mr. C. W. Shoop, of Enterline, Pa., 
delivered in a commendable way, an ora- 
tion on "The Purpose of Life." 

Miss Luella G. Kogelsanger, of Ship- 
pensburg, Pa., editor for the occasion, 
read an excellent paper. 

The main feature of the evening was 



an oration on "Words," delivered by 
Prof. Charles Calvert Ellis, of Philadel- 
phia. Prof. Ellis is a man of exceptional 
training and experience, and has many 
appreciative friends at Elizabethtown. 

Songs by a Sextette, a Quartette, a 
Ladies' Chorus, and the College Chorus 
Class, added variety and interest to the 
program. 

The program was pronounced a success.. 
Elizabeth Myer. 



A Hustling Letter. 

The following letter was received by 
the editor: 

Lancaster, Pa., April 7, 1905. 
My Dear Brother: — 

Inclosed you will please find 
a list of sixty persons who have subscribed 
for Our College Times for one year. You 
will also find my check for fifteen dollars 
($15.) in payment of same. 

I have solicited among a few of my 
friends for these subscribers during spare 
time, going to and from work and when- 
ever opportunity afforded, and therefore 
ask no compensation for the same. 

Our College Times is an excellent mis- 
sionary for the cause of Elizabethtown 
College, and should be in many homes, 
especially in Eastern Pennsylvania. I 
find each number of Our College Times 
to be brim full of good thoughts and sug- 
gestions invaluable to all. 

Elizabethtown College, with her ex- 
cellent, consistent, instructing faculty in 
charge is coming right to the front. 

I expect to become a student of Eliza- 
bethtown College, commencing with the 
opening of the fall term of 1905, and the 
prospects are that you will also have 
Bro. Frank Byer as a student for the fall 
term of 1905 at least, and perhaps for a 
longer period of time, as he has recently 
informed me that the decision has already 
been made to take up some college studies. 
Yours Fraternally, 
Charles Bower. 



OUR COIXEGK TIMES. 



A Day of History. 

At the meeting? of the Board of Trnstoos 
of the College, held April 26, they de- 
eided to erect a new building; which will 
be located a short distance from the 
northeast corner of the present buildins. 

Brethren Jesse Zeigler, I. N. H. Beahm 
and Jos. G. Heisey, constitute the build- 
h\ff committee. 

The work will begin at once, and we 
hope to have it completed as early as 
possible. 

The school and all its friends are loud 
in their praises to our President, Elder 
Jesse Zeigler for his untiring efforts and 
success in soliciting aid for the erection of 
this building 

The chapel and con>mercial hall will 
be on the sam(i floor and are so arranged 
that when necessity demands it, they can 
be opened as one large auditorium. 

The upper floor will be used as dormi- 
tories for gentlemen. While we have 
sufficient funds to allow us to begin 
building, we would he very thankful for 
any aid or contributions our friends may 
feel disposed to give. 

S. P. Engle, Sec. 



Greater Praise. 



Yes, there is praise for Brother Ziegler. 
But Brother Ziegler and others have 
greater praise for those who have so will- 
ingly and liberally contributed. It is 
more blessed to give the pledges than to 
receive them. 

Society Notes. 

The Keystone Literary Society is doing 
very excellent vk'ork this Spring Term. 
Many new students have enrolled and 
\ie hope that those who have not ,yet 
joined the Society will soon be induced 
to hand in their applications. 

We had a very interesting meeting 
April 7, when a Roosevelt program was 
rendered. Mr. Nathan Martin delivered 
a very excellent oration on "Our Nation's 
Chief." The Glee Club sang Roosevelt's 



favorite hymn, and the music was of a 
high order. Throughout, the meeting 
was a grand success. 

The fjresent officers of the Society are: 
Pres.— Mr. C. J. Hanft; Vice Pres. — Mr. 
W. W. Thomas: Secretary — Miss Anna 
Cassel; Cntic — Prof. Sanger; Editor — 
Miss Stauffer. 

Following was the program for Friday 
evening April 28: 
Music. 
Essay — Woman's Opportunity, 

Miss Zortman. 
Describe the Simplon Tunnel, 

Miss Mary Hertzler. 
Debate — Resolved, That the home exerts 

a greater influence in the formation of 

character than the school. 
AQ., Miss Ruth Stayer, Mr. C. W. h'hoop 
Neg., Miss Effie Shenk, Mr. Geo. Light. 
Music. 

Select Reading Mr. Howard Bittner. 

Recitation Miss Blanche Fisher. 

Literary Echo. 
Music. 

The Literary Echo is an up-to-date 
magazine, brim full of solid and witty 
productions and always up to the ptand- 
ard. M. B. n. 



Brooklyn Mission. 



Elder J. Kurtz Miller is pastor at the 
Brethren's Mission, Brooklyn. Brother 
Miller is energetic in his field and deeply 
interested in the Master's work. Sister 
Elizabeth Howe is a noble, consecrated 
woman. She is rendering valuable as- 
sistance. Brother W. M. Howe, who 
did such good service at Elizabethtown, 
will succeed Brother Miller for a time 
during the latter's absence, soliciting for 
the new meeting house, which they 
greatly need. Brother M. B. Miller is a 
growing young minister of the Brooklyn 
Church. The Italian mission near by 
has prospered, and an Italian minister 
was needed. An election was held April 
22. The lot fell on Brother John Caruso, 
a very devout and active member. 



OUR COLI.EAE TIMES. 



Annual Meeting. 

The Annual Meeting of the Brethren 
Church, this year will be held in Bristol, 
Tenn. This is a general conference of 
the entire Brotherhood. Much import- 
ant business will be acted upon, among 
which the name of our people will be 
passed upon. There may be a change in 
the name, and there may not be. If the 
name must change from German Baptist, 
it is hoped that a word of German origin 
meaning Baptist, such as Dunker may be 
selected in its stead, then the name would 
be Dunker Brethren. The one part 
Brethren, from the Scripture, and the 
other part, Dunker, from the German. 
A people sprintiing from the Gospel and 
from Germany should be represented on 
each side, even by their name. We 
should press to hold to something indi- 
cating our German history. The one 
word Dunker would do this. If we find 
that we must lose the name "German Bap- 



tist Brethren," legal ever since 1891, or 
fourteen years, then let us compromise 
on some one German word which means 
the same as the two words, "German" 
and "Baptist," Dunker will fulfill these 
conditions. The greatest tendency seems 
to be in this direction at present. But 
more depends upon what we are, than 
upon what we are called. Our present 
name suits best here in eastern Pennsyl- 
vania. But we shall be liberal enough 
to yield to what best suits the most of 
our Churches. 



The Right Way. 

When you read the letter from brother 
Charles Bowers, which speaks for itself, 
you will be impressed with a fact that 
such a letter is the right kind. Who will 
duplicate his effort? We hope brother 
Bowers will succeed as well in his college 
work here in the future as he has in this 
little canvass. 



THE 



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ELIZABETHTOWN. PA. 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

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J. Harry Brubaker 



PROPRIETOR 




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Agent for Lebanon Steam Laundry. ELIZABETHTOWN, PA- 



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Fine Line of Confections always on hand. 

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LAND ROLLERS, WHEEL- 
BARROWS, STEEL AND CAST 

InUN TnUUuHo, a full line of up-to-date foundry articles 

Corn Shellers* 

There is no better sheller made 
than our 

No. 3, 

ONE-HOPPER, RIGHT HAND SHELLER. 

With cob separator and sieve, as 

shown in the accompanying 

cut. Weight 125 lbs. 

No. 7, 

A TWO HOPPER, LEFT HAND SHELLER, 

furnished with adjustable shaker 

for hand or power use. 

Weight 280 lbs. 



We nianufac'tnre the 

Wooden Stave 

and 

Steel Face 

LAND ROLLERS 



The}- are built like all 
.,^ our goods are, for ser- 
vice. 





^^W^M^-^-' 






Both Phones. Elizabethtown, Pa. 



0m College Cime0. 



"Wisdom is Ihe Frinciixil lliivc/." 



Vol. II. 



Elizabethtown, Pa., July, 1905. 



No. 2. 



General Educational Values. 

BY D. C. EEBER. 

{Continued from May Issue.) 

Traditionally, a liberal education meant 
gentility and besides a funded capital 
yielding interest in terms of culture. A 
contemporaneous educator may be cited 
in defining the modern and revised no- 
tion of a liberal education. He enumer- 
ates a number of qualities which a liber- 
ally educated man should possess in terms 
of powers and possessions. The power of 
concentration capable of use in various 
studies, the power of distribution mean- 
ing ability to arrange and classify newly- 
acquired knowledge, the power of reten- 
tion, so as to be able to call up his intel- 
lectual acquisitions when desired, the 
power of expression, capability of com- 
municating trutli to others clearly and 
forcibly, and finally the power of judging 
correctly constitute these powers. The 
intellectual resources of a cultured man 
should include a knowledge of self, ma- 
thematics, the vernacular, other modern 
tongues, principles and methods of scien- 
tific investigation, the great literatures of 
the world, history, and philosophy. 

Thus equipped, the liberally educated 
man pursues a higher technical course or 
professional course of instruction which 
supplements his liberal studies. This 
training is to lead to a definite end, mak- 
ing mental development subordinate to 
the acquisition of specialized knowledge. 
Hence the value of a study is determined 
to a large extent by the aim in pursuing 



the study and the methods employed in 
teaching it, i. e. whether pursued prin- 
cipally for its own sake, or for the sake of 
a definite end. Arithmetic in the ele- 
mentary school is valuable principally as 
a mental gymnastic, while matht-matics 
in a course in engineering is pursued for 
the sake of its instrumental or scientific 
value. In the one case mathematics has 
a general educational value; in the other, a 
special educational value. The methods of 
teaching in the former instance would be 
adapted to mental development, and 
therefore differ essentially from the 
method in the latter. 

The pertinent question then is: "Are 
there any primary forms of mental ac- 
tivity such as are common to every 
study?" provided one assume the first in- 
terpretation of general educational values. 
To this we must assuredly answer "yes." 
Every study involves attention, a certain 
degree of interest, discrimination, com- 
parison, association, observation, apper- 
ception and conception. In other words, 
every study may be so taught (having 
development in view as an end) that 
these activities enumerated are involved, 
not all to the same degree to be sure but 
to a greater on less extent. By every 
study I now mean rather each of the five 
groups of studies, viz : — mathematics, 
sciences, "motor group" of studies, lan- 
guage, and history. Again, certain studies 
impart to the mind certain universal 
ideas or concepts which are of value out- 
side those studies, and these enable the 
student to acquire that brarich more 
easily. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES. 



The fitndy of mathematics gives ideas 
of distance, size, values tliat are useful in 
geOfTraphy and other sciences. Certain 
conceptions of logical relations are gained 
from the study of the vernacular that are 
helplul in learning foreign languages. 
The sequence of cause and effect occurs 
both in history and in the natural and in 
tiie physical sciences. Habits of orderly 
arrangement, logical sequeiwe, classifica- 
tion may be acquired from the proper 
study of natural sciences, grammar and 
history by requiring the pupil to prepare 
topical outlines of certain sections. The 
habit of outlining each subject studied 
by advanced pupils gives them mental 
grasp, so that they can readily apprehend 
any situation as a whole and determine 
what step to take first. 

In the acquisition of any kind of know- 
ledge, conceptual activity is necessary, 
and this involves the following processes 
respectfully: analytic observation, ab- 
straction, comparison, generalization, 
and classification. The mind develops 
and ideas are gained first by a process of 
analysis, then by a process of comparison, 
concluding with the counter-process, syn- 
thesis. These processes are to some de- 
gree involved in all thought activities. 
All effective teaching is thought provok- 
ing, and certain habits or dispositions of 
mind are left behind assisting in other 
studies. Stout says in effect that "dis- 
positions left behind by my experience 
with one thing will be excited by the 
sight of a similar object. These disposi- 
tions having a common factor interpene- 
trate. Just as far as this interpenetra- 
ti^n of mental dispositions exists, the ex- 
ercise of the memory for certain ex- 
l)eriences will improve the memory for 
analogous experiences. But the exercise 
of memory in the study of language will 
do little to improve it for the retention of 
chemical formula." 

The perception of certain categorical 
relations is developed by one or several 
studies. One species of quantitative re- 
lations, namely spatial relations, occurs 



in mathematics, and geography; and in 
so far as these are common, the one study 
will reinforce the other. Temporal re- 
lations must be discerned in arithmetic, 
grammar, history, and geology. Rela- 
tions of similarity or identity exist in 
nature stud}', language studies, mathe- 
matical studies, and formal studies. 
Causal relations should be traced in 
grammar, history, science, and manual 
training. Logical relations similarly 
must be perceived to pursue mathematics, 
grammar, Latin, and all Language study. 
Stout calls the majority of these relations 
the categories of percei)tual consciousness 
which appear in a rudimentary way as 
forms of synthesis even at the level of 
perceptual activity. 

Prof. James says: "The faculty of vol- 
untarily bringing back a wondering at- 
tention over and over again is the very 
root of judgment, character, and will." 
The ability to concentrate one's energies 
on any one thing for a definite time ac- 
quired by pursuing one study is certainly 
valuable in assisting the mind to concen- 
trate upon any problem and is the secret 
of great mental achievement along any 
line of endeavor. Leading as it does to 
the habit of doing one thing at a time 
and doing it with all one's might sup- 
plants capriciousness and prevents dissi- 
pation of energies. Hence this disposi- 
tion of mind is indeed fundamental in ac- 
quiring stability of character and in 
training the will. 

(To be continued.) 

Oommeflcement Collection. 

At the closie of the program on com- 
mencement day, a collection was taken. 
The collection was not announced on the 
program, and yet the sum of $23.38 was 
realized. This money will be applied in 
procuring additional equipment for the 
culinary department. And thanks is 
again returned to the friends of the in- 
stitution for this benefactor. d. c. r. 



OUR COIvIvEGE TIMES. 



I 



College Notes. 

From Elizabethtown Chroniclt'. 

The Alumni meeting on Tuesday even- 
ino; was a success. The music directed 
by Prof. Wampler, the essay by Miss 
Rider, and the recitation by Mrs. Groff 
were all highly complimented. The ad- 
dress by Elder Hertzler was witty, ten- 
der, pointed and clear. Come again, 
father. He says he rather likes to be 
called father, now that he is growing old. 
Class Day on Wednesday afternoon 
was very entertaining, and a pronounced 
success. 

We regret to lose from our ranks Mr. 
I. E. Shoop. He has taught shorthand 
efficiently. But as our worthy Professor 
H. K. Oher will have him in charge, he 
will still seem like of the family. He 
will be succeeded in shorthand by Mr. 
Nathan Martin wiio is expected to give 
equally as good satisfaction. 

Elder I. W. Taylor preached the Bac- 
calaureate sermon on Sundav evening, 
June 11, to a large and appreciative au- 
dience. His discourse was a matter of 
fact, directed especially to the class. The 
sermon was interesting, practical, and 
dealt with vital issues. His theme was, 
Press Onward. 

Our President returned from Tennessee 
laet Saturday. During his absence he de- 
livered six sermons and seven addresses. 
Everywhere he loves to tell the story of 
Elizabethtown College. He saw some 
magnificent country, but nothing to sur- 
pass Elizabethtown and her surroundings. 
Prof. W. H. Sanger, having within his 
own choice of remaining at Elizabeth- 
town College, or of accepting a position 
in his Alma Mater, Bridgewater College, 
has chosen ' the latter. It is with regret 
that we part. His stay has been pleasant 
among us, and he has made some strong 
friends. May success attend his labors 
in Virginia! His strength and talent are 
expected to ripen into eminence. 
Jacob G. Mever and Jacob Z. Herr 



have both accepted jiositions in Eliza- 
bethtown College. Prof. Herr, as we are 
to know [lim during next session, is com- 
pleting the Englisli Sciientific course this 
year, and will spend the summer months 
in Columbus, Ohio, in the Zanerian Apt 
School, taking post graduate work in 
plain and ornamental penmanship, draw- 
ing, bookke('[)ing, etc. Having complet- 
ed a Commercial Course before co;ning to 
Elizabethtown College, and having these, 
subsequent ojijjortunities, he should prov^ 
eflicient in drawing, bookkeeping, and 
penmanship Jacob G. Meyer whom we 
are to know also as a future Professor, 
and who taught satisfactorily in the 
public schools of Pennsylvania, and has 
spent four consecutive sessions, in part or 
whole, in Elizabethtown College, will 
spend the summer uKmths in Lebanon 
county in the interests of home and th« 
College. 

Thursday, June 8, was examination 
day at the College for the Senior Class in 
the Teachers' Course. The examining 
committee consisted of Superintendents, 
Professors H. J. Wickey, and M. J. 
Brecht. Students finishing this course 
are, Lydia M. Buckwalter, Mary E. 
Hertzler, Elizabeth A. Zortman, and 
Jacob G. Meyer. Each member passed, 
and was granted a provisional certificate 
to teach in the public schools, and upon 
one year's successful teaching will be 
granted a permanent certificate. The 
Examining Committee, by virtue of their 
fairness and ability, made a most iavor- 
able impression upon our student body. 
Both delivered addresses to the school, 
which were cordially appreciated. Th@ 
College is doing excellent work and push- 
ing onward in the cause of true educa- 
tion. 



Commencement day was hot. Trustee 
S, P. Engle gave the College a fine lot of 
palm leaf fans, which came in well. They 
may serve future occasions. Thanks, 
brother E. ! 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES. 



€)ur CoUese Cimes^. 

EDITORIAL STAFF. 

EDITOR IN chief: 

I. N. H. BEAHM. 

associate editors: 
D. C. REBER, I. E. SHOOP. ELIZABETH MEYER 

special editors: 
Local Editor, - - - GEO. H. LIGHT 

Society Editor. - - MARY B. HESS 

BUSINESS management: 
Managing Editor and Business Manager, 



ASSOCIATES : 



H. K. OBER 



ELMER RUHL 



J. Z. HERR, 

Our College Times is published bi-monthly. 
Subscription price (six numbers) 25 cents, single 
copy •') cents. 



Vacation ! 

Sister Good is better. 

A friend talks up the college. 

Masons are busy on new building. 

Boys and girls, enjoy your vacation. 

Prospects for September 4 are good. 

Read the oration by Mary B. Hess. 

Dr. Reber's home is nearing comple- 
tion. 

Prof. Uavis writes good news from old 
Somerset. 

Commencement of 1905 was called a 
big success. 

The orators did beautifully at com- 
mencement. 

Look out for the Professor to call dur- 
ing the summer. 

Read the new catalogue. It is called a 
handsome one. 

D. L. Heisey is the architect of the 
new College building. 

A good time to criticise a teacher is 
after he has been tested well in class 
room. Come around next spring and let 
us have your views' on the new members 
of our faculty. 



C. VV. Shoop delivered the final oration. 
His farewell was rich and touching. 

Prof. Wampler is canva-ssing in the 
beautiful Cumberland valley as we go to 
press. 

Remember Prof. Wickey's advice about 

the College — "Talk it up, work it up, 
pay it up." 

Miss Myer expects to spend her vaca- 
tion mainly at the U. of P. in special 
preparation. 

I. E. Shoop, the genial stenographer of 
last year, now has a good position with 
Prof. Ober. 

"Little Lebanon" is entitled to recog- 
nition in our faculty from the students 
she sends. 

Jacob G. Myer and Jacob Z. Herr will 
do their best to bring a good delegation 
for September 4. 

Jacob G. Myer has arranged to do 
some special work in favorite branches 
during vacation. 

Notice careful Ij' the agricultural course 
we now offer in new catalogue. Now, 
farmers, is your time. 

The election of three trustees by elect- 
ors on June 15 resulted in the re-election 
of Jesse Ziegler. S. H. Heitzler and A 
S. Kreider. 

We are happy to announce that Elder 
J. K. Miller will be with us in the Jan- 
uary Bible Term. Also Elder S. H. 
Hertzler, again 

Elder J. Kurtz Miller is popular with 
the senior class. He was chosen to de- 
liver a special discourse to the class, but 
could not accept on account of previous 
engagement. 

Sister Beahm dined over one hundred 
visiting guests commencement day — well 
on to two hundred in all. But she had 
plenty of good help. This was the big- 
gest dining hall work ever done on Col- 
lege Hill. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES. 



We need more subscribers for O. C. T. 

B. G. Groff is helping push business on 
College Hill. 

Jos. G. Heisey is much interested in 
the new college building. 

Pastor H. M Miller of Elizabetheown, 
visited the school May 23. He delivered 
an address in chapel, which was much 
appreciated. 

We long for space to mention all names 
registered recency from Bedford to Mont- 
gomery, Lebanon to Cumberland, and 
elsewhere. Come again, dear friends. 

Some friend at Myerstown sends a nice 
article on the pretty marriage of J. Z. Bru- 
haker and Amelia G. Minnich. It came 
too late to find space. Peace, plenty and 
power to the high contracting parties ! 



Society Notes. 

The last meeting of the Keystone Liter- 
ary Society, for this school year, was 
h<;ld H'riday evening, June 9. 

The first feature of importance was the 
inauguration of officers, as follows: Pres., 
C. S. Livengood; Secretary, Miss Ruth 
Stayer; Critic, Prof. Davis. 

A Whittier Program was rendered, and 
this was one of the most successful meet- 
ings the society held during the spring 
term It was very interesting to the large 
audience present. The Chapel was filled. 

The most important features were the 
debate, recitations by Misses Nellie Hart- 
man and Mazie Martin respectively, and 
an essay on "Mogg Megone" by Miss 
Mary B. Hess. The question for debate 
was, Resolved that Poetry is more Bene- 
ficial to Humanity than Press Fiction. 
The debaters were Messrs. Ober Morning 
and Ralph Schlosser on the aff. and 
Messrs C. W. Shoop and Elmer Ruhl on 
the Neg. They all advanced many 
weighty arguments which made the de- 
bate a hot one. The judges and the 
house decided in favor of the negative. 

The members did verv creditable work 



during the last year, and we trust that 
those who return in the fall will perform 
their duty with new zeal and energy, so 
that the society may ever prosper and 
fulfil the course for which it exists. 

The societv has the reporter's best 
wishes for its future success. m. b. h. 



Class Day. 

The Class of 1905 rendered the first 
program of its kind in Ihe history of the 
College, on Wednesday P. M., June 14th. 

After all the storms and sunshines 
through which the class passed during the 
year, this was a beautiful closing scene. 

From Miss Blanche Fisher, the class 
Historian, was given a very interesting if 
not wholly authentic account of the past 
career of each member of the class. 

The large and appreciative audience 
congratulated the Class very heartily on 
the success of their efforts. 

This program and the Commencement 
program on the following morning marked 
the close of the school career of this, the 
largest class in the history of the College. 

We trust this class may ever keep 
before them their motto, "Ut labor ita 
praemium," and that their lives may be 
lives of true service. 

Lydia M. Buckwalter, Sec. 



Preparatory Singing. 

On May 5, Bro. B. F. Warn pier, music- 
al director at Elizabethtcwn College, 
came to Norristown, giving a few periods 
on singing, prior to our Children's day 
exercise and lovefeast, which all enjoyed 
and proved so helpfnl to all services. He 
also gave a short address at the close of 
the children service entitled "The Model 
Sunday School Boy," which was well 
received. Our brother during his short 
stay, endeared himself to many, and 
hereafter when in this part of Montgom- 
ery county he will find the "latch string" 
on the outs'de, with warm greetings on 
the inside. T. F. Imf.er. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES. 



Possibilities of Elizabethtown College. 

Elizabethtow n Ciille;;e, surrounded by 
a land of beauty and in(lastry, is typical 
of threat possibilities. If her noble stand 
for true manhood and womanhood con- 
tinues through coming years, she will 
deserve company with the foremost insti- 
tutions of the day. Then will her influ- 
ence be the realization of what her geo- 
graphy symbolizes and the reasons for her 
existence demand. , 

The seeds she has scattered have germ- 
inated and are pushing their tiny sprouts 
to the light, which if fostered will develop 
into fields of beautiful harvest, whose 
products will be sent throughout the 
world for the purpose of nourishing 
humanity. As the student body increases 
and as tlmt body realizes their responsi- 
bility to the institution, to mankind, and 
to their God, so soon will the possibilities 
mature. 

The strenuous demand of our times ie 
for true education. What conf^titntes 
true education? It is that which harmon- 
iously develops all the human powers 
to the end of service. 

Great achievements await the institu- 
tion along this line. She is built upon a 
foundation with right as the chiei corner 
etone, from which radiate principles in 
accordance with the sublime teachings of 
Christ. With these principles maintained, 
her scholastic attainments will be of an 
ideal type. The school needs the sup- 
port of her friends in her pure ideals, and 
step by step she will materialize them, 
until she is the admiration of the country. 
Variously the possibilities of the institu- 
tion are latent, but the potent sunshine of 
the future, under benign patronage, will 
unfold such unseen elements into gran- 
deur. 

Judging from what has already been 
contributed to the institution, we must 
believe that she will soon be in posses- 
sion of benefactions or scholarships for 
the maintenance of some of her students. 

She occupies high grounds by antag- 
onizing College rowdyism, which exists 



in so many modern schools. 

I'res. Klliot, of Harvard Tniversity, 
realizes and has plainly stated the frivol- 
ities of the Institutions of today tend to 
degrade mankind. Since physical mani- 
festations influence the inner nature for 
good or evil these existing defects in mod- 
ern education must bring the wrong 
result. 

This rowdyism flavors of the Gladia- 
torial combats in the Ampitheaters of 
Rome and the Grecian Games nf Athens. 

For this immorality Elizabethtown Col- 
lege is trying to substitute principles and 
laws founded on a philosophy which will 
make the body render the highest service 
to the soul and the mind, or the educa- 
tion of triple unity. 

The College has also great possibilities 
along agricultural lines. 

The present day tendency of young 
men after they have finished a college 
course, is to leave the farm. It is there- 
fore of immediate importance that our 
colleges give the much needed instruction 
in this science. When an ideal system of 
agriculture flourishes in this school, its 
influence will be so far-reaching that many 
farmers will be ready to adopt and prac- 
tise her teachings, and the graduates will 
turn their attention to the rural districts 
to pursue the noblest of occupations. 

Farm life will then be regarded as ideal 
and evidently fondamental in the economy 
of the race. 

What are the possibilities in social 
circles? Those who come under her 
instruction are unconsciously moulded 
into conscientious men and women. 
Justice pervades her instruction, and the 
motto she constantly places l)efore her 
students is: The Great Doing of Little 
Things Will Make the Great Man. 

May we see her send characters which 
will be useful in the great future, for 
which they are trained. 

Knitting needles seem a small ar- 
ticle, but through them may be wrought 
the fairest designs in the richest wools, 
so through the students of Elizabethtown 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES. 



College as a material foundation, may he 
woven the everlasting fabrics of good 
character in those with whom they come 
in contact, whether in the home or com- 
ninnity at large. 

The world calls more loudly to-day for 
Christian young people than ever before, 
so this institution may realize vast relig- 
ious possibilities as the years come. She 
will produce many virtuous young men 
and women, who will be ready to sacri- 
fice the comforts and glories of home in 
order that some heathen who knows not 
the Christ, may receive and enjoy with 
us the Heaven of rest. 

Toward true citizenship she will play 
an important part. She will produce men 
who are the embodiment of her teachings. 

True citizen is but a single application 
of true education and citizenship but typ- 
ifies that patriotism which pervades the 
common wealth of Israel. 

1 repeat, a glorious future is before this 
institution. A few years hence she will 
be known not only to the vicinity wherein 
she is located, but her influence may be 
felt throughout the Union, yea, it may 
extend to the heathen countries which 
lie beyond yon ocean. 

Before Moses built the tabernacle he 
saw the whole pattern of it in prophetic 
vision. In some secluded spot on Sinai's 
heights it stood before him woven out of 
sunbeams. He descended to the moun- 
tain's foot to repeat it in actual curtains, 
gold and wood. He saw the end at the 
beginning, not so with an instituticm. 
Her possibilities are not revealed in a 
burst, but unfolded bit by bit. Each day 
she is weaving a garland fashioning a 
metal. Look twenty-five years hence 
when these disjointed pieces will suddenly 
come together, and then those who are 
now laboring amidst great difficulties in 
behalf of the institution will see in reality 
what they now see darkly. 

Her pure principles, which are the buds 
of to-day, will then be the roses blooming 
in the educational, social, agricultural, 
religious, and political circles. 



A Government will be maintaineil 
which exists for the protection of true 
education, true ideala and Christianity. 

As the mountains are round about 
Jerusalem, so will the influence of Eliza- 
bethtown College help to protect the true, 
the beautiful, the good, tending to that 
perfect and universal peace which shall 
reign supreme and eternal. 

[Delivered by Mary B. Hess as part of the Class 
Day exercises, on Wednesday, June 14, 1905.] 



A Good Effort. 

The class poem by J. H. Stayer of 
Woodbury, Pennsylvania, was published 
in "The Chronicle," and on account of its 
personal interest, its rhyme, and College 
fact is reproduced in "Our College Times." 
This will furnish many, a chance to clip 
and preserve, or to preserve by filing this 
issue of our paper. Mr. Stayer has been 
one of the sturdy boys on College Hill, 
and well deserves the honor bestowed 
upon him by the class. He completed 
the Commercial course. The poem jin- 
gles of true poetry in more than one stan- 
za, and after he has taken a cour.se in 
literary subjects, his poetry will rank still 
higher. He possesses the brain to push 
into the realm of science and esthetic cul- 
ture. We hereby encourage him to 
higher learning, and extend to him a 
most cordial invitation to Elizahethtown 
College. He is a staunch friend of his 
Alma Mater and will work for her suc- 
cess. 



Complete Catalogue. 

From the Elizabethtown Chronicle. 

The sixth annual catalogue of the Eliza- 
bethtown College has been issued. It is 
neatly gotten-upand fnrnishes all desired 
information in regard to tiiis popular in- 
stitution of learning, which is rapidly 
forging to the front. 



The N. E. A. meets at Asbury Park in 
July. Some of our faculty expect to at- 
tend. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES. 



Commencement. 

The fifth annual commencement exer- 
cises of the College were held Thursday, 
June 15th, heKinnint; at 9 o'clock a. ni. 
Crowds assembled earlj', filling the chapel 
and halls to overflowing. 

A few minutes before the hour, the 
Faculty and graduates entered the chapel 
in a body and after taking their respect- 
ive seats, the exercises were opened with 
prayer by Eld. Jesse Zeigler, Pres. of 
Board of Trustees. 

The first oration was delivered by 
Lydia M. Buckwalter, of Lancaster, Pa., 
her subject being "Beckoning Stars." 
She said in part, "Who can estimate the 
worth of the beckoning from that great 
galaxy of stars, the mothersof our nations? 
Truthfully have many of the world's great 
heroes attributed all the success of their 
lives to the influence and teaching of 
their mothers. Of glory's immortal tab- 
lets there are myriads for them, 
for them alone ! Oblivion shall never 
shroud their splendor, the everlasting 
power of reverence shall guard them, 
that the generations of men may repeat 
the names recorded there, the beloved 
names of 'Our Mothers.' " Miss Buck- 
waiter closed with the following words of 
welcome: "And now ere we close, it 
becomes our pleasant privilege to extend 
to you a most cordial welcome to the 
Commencement exercises of the class of 
1905. We well know with what interest 
you have watched the progress of our 
school life, our probation, as it were; we 
fully appreciate your cordial greetings and 
heartfelt congratulations when yuu learned 
of the success of our eflbrts; we feel deeply 
your kindly sympathy and cheer which 
encouraged us to go forward, undaunted 
by failure, undismayed by failure, undis- 
mayed by obstacles, and again we bid you 
welcome to this happy day. 

Our school work here is now over, and 
only happy memories of it remain. The 
final battle has been fought and to-day we 
celebrate our triumph. 

Some of you once stood in the places 



which we occupy to-day and faithful to 
your Alma .Mater, have come to visit her 
once more. Some of you come as strang- 
ers, but you are none the less welcome. 
To each of you, we extend the hand of 
greeting. To our fellow-students, who 
have shared many of the joys and sorrows 
of our school life; to the trustees, who 
have endeavored in so many ways to add 
to our comfort and opportunities; to the 
Faculty, who have been not only our 
teachers, but our kind and sympathizing 
friends, we say, welcome to the exercises 
which mark the close of our school days. 
To one and all present here to-day, we 
say. Welcome, welcome, welcome !" 

The next oration, on "Uncrowned 
Heroes" by Mary E. Hertzler of Eliz- 
abethtovvn, was full of noble examples 
of service and sacrifice, among them 
being the fireman, Alfred Crosby, who 
proved himself a great hero in the late 
wreck Tiear Harrisburg. She portrayed 
beautifully the untiring love of a mother 
sitting by the'side of a sick child, fearing 
to relax her hold from a wound lest the 
life might ebb away in the flow of blood. 

I. E. Oberholtzer in his oration on 
"Hard Lines," said that the obstacles in 
our pathway and the difficulties which 
confront us, are what is meant by hard 
lines. His words were full of encourage- 
ment and he closed by saying, "Young 
friends, be thankful for the hard lines in 
your pathway. It shall mean only a 
little sacrificed effort, only a determined 
will, together with implicit faith and 
confidence in God, when we shall have 
reached the goal where all hard lines 
vanish and we shall stand as free men 
among the hosts beyond." 

The next oration on "Life Purpose" 
was delivered by P^lizabeth A. Zortman, 
of Palmyra, Pa. She compared the 
j'ourney of life to ships sailing out at 
sea — one guided by an aimless captain, 
drifts to and fro, and is finally wrecked 
on the shoals and sandbars; the other 
guided by a captain having a clearly 
defined purpose, sails calmly along and 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES. 



safely enters the harbor of eternal day. 

J. G. Meyer of Fredericksburg, Pa., 
spoke on the "Dignity of Labor." He 
forcibly enumerated the accomplishments 
of labor, how it dives into the bowels of 
the earth and unlocks the treasures hid- 
den there, how it soars to the stars, tells 
their number and dimensions, and crosses 
the billows of the sea and. brings to us the 
products of foreign lands. 

"The Power of Kindness" was beauti- 
fully presented by Minerva E. Stauffer, 
of Elizabethtown, Pa. She emphasized 
the importance of practising kindness 
everywhere, and especially in the home. 

Jacob Z Herr, of Myerstown, Pa. 
spoke on "Sunshine." He told us that 
all the beautiful and useful things in 
nature would be but imaginings if it were 
not for the energy that comes from the 
great golden ball above us. He said that 
all of us should reflect the sunlight of 
righteousness upon all with whom we 
come in contact, and thus aid in the 
destruction of the germs of degradation 
and sin. 

The next oration on "Mene Tekel 
Upharsin," was delivered by Mary B. 
Hess of Elizabethtown, Pa. She said that 
just as King Belshazzar in his day was 
weighed in the balance and found want- 
ing, so many nations of the world since 
then have failed to reach the required 
standard, and she urged the necessity of 
not only nations, but individuals striving 
to attain such a degree of perfection as 
shall meet the approval of God. 

Charles W. Shoop, ot Enterline, Pa., 
pictured to us "The Model Man." He 
spoke of Socrates, the great teactier, 
Demosthenes, the great orator, and Na- 
poleon, the great warrior, but with all 
of these there Wits none to compare with 
the Man of Nazareth, whom he presented 
as the one great model for all to follow. 
Elizabeth Myer 



{To be continued. 



Subscribe for Our College Times. 



Final Examination. 

June 8 will ever be memorable to the 
Senior Class of the Teachers' Course from 
the fact of their having been examined 
by a committee of superindendents. The 
examining committee consisted of Prof. 
M. J. Brecht, superintendent ot Lancas- 
ter county, and Prof. H. J. Wickey, su- 
perintendent of the Middlefown public 
schools. 

In addition to the examination, each 
member of the class presented a thesis on 
a pedagogical subject which is a require- 
ment for a graduation in this course. The 
subjects of the theses are as follows: 
'Woman as a Teacher," by Lydia M. 
Buckwalter; "Horace Mann as an Edu- 
cator," by Mary E. Hertzler; "Work and. 
Influence of Pestalozzi," by J. G. Meyer; 
"The Education of Woman," by Eliza- 
beth A. Zortman. Each thesis is type 
written and shall contain at least three 
thousand words. 

The result of the examination was very 
gratifying. Supt. Brecht issued a No. 1 
provisional ceriiflcate to each one ex- 
pecting to teach, with the understanding 
that if satisfactory work is done in the 
school room next term he will issue a 
professional certificate to them in the 
spring without examination. This means 
much to our graduates in the Teachers' 
Course inasmuch as it practically exempts 
them from examination in Lancaster 
county in the future and puts them on 
essentially the same footing as those hold- 
ing a State Normal diploma. 

The gentlemen of the committee both 
delivered addresses to the school and 
visited the classes. They seemed pleased 
with the work done and spoke in com- 
plim^^ntary terms of the outlook and pro- 
gress of the college. Supt. Brecht spoke 
to members of the faculty, praising the 
work of our undergraduates who have 
passed very creditable examinations for 
provisional certificates. Among those 
receiving the best marks are k. W. 
Schlosser, Mazie R. Martin, Geo. W. 
Light, and E. R. Ruhl. n. c. r. 



lO 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES. 



Class Poem. 



By J. H. Stayer, (Jlass Day Exercises, Elizubeth- 
"tovvn College, June 14th. 

Here's to the class of 1905 

And I wish I could tell how they did strive. 
To gain respect and to gather knowledge, 

For 'twould be a credit to E'town College. 

Here's to the President who has worked with a 

will 

With Cicero and Caesar his min<1 to fill. 
May he ever look back to th»» time spent here 

As a season of profit and joy and good cheer. 

Our Vi<'c-I'rcsi(k'nt now is a wonderful boy, 
To sec liiin smile you'd think he's all joy. 

But he can stiiily, too, if he tries very hard. 
And then his face, it measures a yard. 

HeVe's to our Secretary so very energetic 
■That her future we think is very prophetic 

Of much good, and we hope she may ever be found 
In the sc-hool-room, where happy young voices 

resound. 

Our Treasurer's name comes next on the roll, 
A very kind-hearted and good-natured soul. 

She often gets hurried and flustered, too, 
But her virtues number more than a few. 

Here's to the Doctor our class can afford, 
His deeds are so numerous we cannot record. 

But he lights up the darkness and dispels all the 

gloom 
When he slowly and solemnly enters the room. 

Next comes Miss Zortman. a true, noble girl 
Who has gleamed from her les.sons many a pearl, 

She will make a good worker in the mission field, 
And over many lives her influence wield. 

Here's to Miss Blanche the wit of the class, 
And when you displease her, watch out or alas, 

She will hold you up as an object of mirth 
'Til you think you've not a friend on the earth, 

Now there's David Landis, a poor, slender youth, 
Who, I'm sorry to .«ay on accoiint of the drouth 

Has withered a little, but we think he'll recover 
When he leaves our dear College to go home to 
his mother. 

Here's to Mr. Hollada. the one who has brought 
Our papers and letters with messages fraught; 
And to Allen and Ezra who have left their home 

nest. 
And are traveling and working their way in the 

west. 

Over there sits Miss Minerva E. StaufTer. 

The cliiss (•■)ul(i ri'iilly not do without her, 
Yet her mood shi' changes so oft in a trice 

That she needs very often a bit of advice. 

Mr. Breitigan's name next greet); our eyes, 
Who always so bravely and faithfully tries 

To do his work in a creditable way. 
And "I can't" or "I won't" he never would say. 

Now here's to Mi.ss Diffenbaugh, the lady who 

smiles, 
And Miss HofTman, too, who shared in her trials, 
They were comrades and friends, term in and term 

out, 
And loyal to each other they are without doubt. 

Now there's that Oberholtzer, a stout, sturdy lad. 
Who tried to get all that could possibly be had 

From Geometry, Chemistry and Botany, too. 
And who stuck to his work like paper to glue. 



Here's to Mi.ss Hcrtzler, another young teacher. 
Who never, oh never would marrv a [ireacher, 

A good idea, for his would be, oh what a fate. 
For to his meetings and sermons he'd alwavsbe 

late. 

Next comes Mr. Hanft. onr comical l)oy, 
Who's always so pleasant and filled lip with joy, 

But he's .so kind-hearted we never can .say 
One word to his discredit at the close of the day. 

Now there's that Mille', I almost forgot, 
But to leave him out would spoil thf whole lot. 

For he can talk and argue till you almost believe. 
That not a soul in this world he'd ever deceive. 

Next comes Mi.ss Kline with her pleasant face. 
Who is nimble and full of action and grace; 

She is industrious, too, for she wrirks all the day 
At shorthand and typewriting just over the way. 

Here come the Shoop brothers— pillars of steel— 
Their knowledge it seems sometimes like a 

wheel. 
Without top or bottom, without beginning or end; 
And thrice happy is he who can name them his 

friend. 

Here's to Miss Little with a smile on her lips. 

And a song in her heart as through hallway she 

trips; 
She can add a sum quickly or take down a letter. 

And on the typewriter we have few any better. 

Here's a dignified boy who's name is Walter Gish, 
Whom to have with us more, we often did wish. 

For with his pleasant smile and his stately mien, 
To be respected, needs but to be seen. 

And now farewell to these classmates dear. 
May we remember with pleasure the past school 

year; 
And though ench year brings us added cares. 
W c'll ever be loyal to the College who bears 
The blue and the gray, the bamur we love. 
And may the grace of God come down from 

above. 
And keep her and shield her in the depth of his 

love. 



Why I Like Elizabethtown College. 

Because of the many excellent oppor- 
tunities afforded, and of the thoroujih- 
ness in all clasp-rooin work. It is situat- 
ed at a very healthful location, and is 
surrounded by many beautiful landscapes. 
It seems hotne-like. Every student feels 
like a member of a large family. Its 
methods are up to the times. Its faculty 
is composed of the best material. You 
get what you want. 

I would urtie all who wish to go to 
school, to attend this College, because of 
the kindly interest that the teachers 
manifest in the student, and because it is 
just the place for anybody who wants a 
good home while at school. I certainly 
can say I received excellent instructions. 
Ada Mineuva LirrLE. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES. 



II 



Specific Distinctions of Important Words 
for the Young Teacher. 

Prepared especially for the Pedagogy Class of 
last term. 

1. A principle is a starting point, a 
fundamental truth, a constitutional in- 
herency. 

2. A laid is a necessary mode of action. 

3. A rule is a guiding statement but 
not a necessary truth. 

4. A muxini is a saying or proverb 
generally accepted as true but is more 
liable to exceptions than a rule. 

5. A fact is a truth within the domain 
of experience; or a fact is an experienced 
truth. 

6. Truth is a true thought — either of 
God or man 

7. Science is truth classified into an 
organic unity. 

8. Art is the application of knowl- 
edge or of anything. Art is variously 
classified, as fine arts, industrial arts, etc., 
and flourishes under the fashioning of 
the creative imagination. 

9. A trade is a vocation requiring 
manual labor, but has reference to mak- 
ing or constructing. 

10. An artisan is one who applies 
knowledge more or less mechanically 
with little or no imagination. He fol- 
lows in the footsteps of his "rude fore- 
father;" he is a copyist. 

11. Education is the science of human 
growth, involving knowledge, power, and 
skill. True Education is the science and 
the art which furnishes learning, power, 
skill in harmonious proportion to the 
end of complete service and righteous 
character. 

12. Ktioidedge is the conscious cer- 
tainty of anything and is both actual 
and potential. 

13. Power is the latent or actual capa- 
city to act. 

14. Skill is the free, easy, accurate ap- 
plication of knowledge and power. 

15. Self- activity is the inherent tend- 
ency of the human soul to act under ap- 



propriate occasions, intuitively or voli- 
tionally. 

16. Occadon is the reason why we act, 
or the reason wh)' a cause operates, a 
condition for a cause to act. 

17. Cause is that which produces an 
effect. It is also inherent and never 
secondary. 

18. Temperament is the combination of 
all our physical and mental functions. 

Miss Fowler. 

19. JJisposition is the natural and focal- 
ized tendency of character or tempera- 
ment. 

20. A business is a vocation which 
handles and exchanges material values. 

21. A Profession is a vocation requir- 
ing a liberal education, and is engaged in 
primarily for the purpose of material re- 
mureration. 

22. An artist is one who applies knowl- 
edge ideally and consciously for the sake 
of the thing in hand. The thing in 
hand and the end in view are identi- 
fied. Science is a thinko ; an artisan 
is a worker; an artist is a careful, 
accurate, ideal worker. Science is 
truth; art is action. In all true art the 
pay or material remuneration is lost sight 
of, the artist has even lost himself in the 
work, and his sole aim is to give material 
embodiment to his ideal. This high type 
or high calling may be taken into every 
department of human endeavor. It is 
the only way in which every vocation 
may be transfigured. It is the only 
method by which every one may make 
life artistic. It is the only life really 
worth living. There is no art high-er 
than the art of teaching — verily, the 
"teacher is an artist of artists." His 
calling rises far above the idea of a trade, 
of a business, of artisanship, of a mere 
profession. It stands crowned with a 
royal diadem in the cheerful, bur.yant, 
atmosphere of ideal freedom and en- 
deavor. 



Commencement left happy memories. 



12 



OUR COLI.EGE TIMES. 



Locals. 

BY G. H. L. 

School is over 

A happy vacation to all. 

Mr. Jacob Z. Herr expects to spend his 
vacation in Columbus, O. 

The mailing: of the new catalogue has 
waited on July issue of "0. C. T." in 
some instances. 

Dr. Reber will be busy getting: his 
house ready to move in by next fall, and 
canvassing for the college. 

A number of students attencled the 
lovefeast at Chi(]ues on Thursday after- 
noon after the Commencement. 

Brethren Bower, from Lancaster, and 
Jacob Graybill, form Harrisburg, will be 
students at the College next year. 

A number of our students took the 
Teachers' Examination and were success- 
ful in procuring schools. May all be suc- 
cessful in their work 

Messrs. C. VV. Shoop. C. J. Hanft, 
and Prof. Sanger expect to spend their 
vacatiori in Pittsburg and vicinity, where 
they will do some canvassing. 

Prof. B. F. Wampler expects to spend 
ten days at his home in Virginia after 
which time he expects to return and do 
some work along the line of music. 

All the programs of Commencement 
week were very commendably rendered. 
The meetings certainly were a success 
and shall long be remembered by both 
students and those who attended them. 

Our books and pencils we now lay aside 
for a season. The hay and harvest fields 
are before us. What a blessing! We feel 
to enter them with a will and spirit 
nourished by Elizabethtown College, 
"A spirit for work." 

Our president I. N. H. Beahm attended 
the Annual Conference at Bristol, Tenn., 
June 17th and 18th he spoke in the Little 
Swatara church, where he preached two 
soul-cheering sermons. His talk to the 
Sunday School was highly appreciated. 



The feeling of our hearts was not that 
of joy as down the walk we slowly moved 
looking across our left shoulders to takea 
last glance at our second home. When 
we return in the fall great shall be the 
change that shall have taken place, but 
when Prof. Beahm, Dr. Reber, Prof. 
Ober, Prof. Elizabeth .Meyer, Prof. Davis, 
Prof. Wampler, and Mrs. and others of 
our friends shall greet us with a hearty 
welcome, we shall fall as though we were 
at home again 



Commercial Program. 

The program rendered on Wednesday 
evening of Commencement was a suc- 
cess. D. C. Reber gave an appropriate 
address of welcome. The address to the 
graduates in the commercial course was 
delivered by J. H. Eshelman, cashier of 
the Exchange Bank. This address wns 
full of good practical ideas given in an 
earnest and sincere manner. It was well 
received by the class and entire audience. 
The number of graduates in this' course 
was fifteen, and all were present except 
three, Allen A. Hertzler, Ezra H. Leh- 
man and Ira G. Myers, who had com- 
pleted the course earlier in the year and 
are employed at a distance. Among the 
members present who also finished dur- 
ing the year and are holding positions, 
were Elizabeth Kline, Opal Hoffman, 
Jas. H. Breitigam, John M. Miller, Wal- 
ter Gish and 1. E. Shoop. 

The chairman, H. K. Ober, who has 
charge of the Commercial Department, 
then gave a short address to the class 
under the title of "Closing Remarks." 
These parting words to the class were 
fraught with good advice and were given 
with feeling and earnestness. Prof. 
Wampler directed the music, which was 
well rendered and heartily received, k. 



Miss Sue Buckwalter has obtained a 
good certificate to teach. Congratula- 
tions ! 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES. 



13 



Reasoning. 

Eeasoning is one of man's highest en- 
dowments. Reason, or intuition, is the 
background and rational impress of this 
interring and onward tendency of mind. 
Reasoning is judging, but alwavs indirect 
judging. It is mediate judging. A mid- 
dle idea or middle term is always in- 
volved in reasoning. Thoughts or prop- 
ositions are the instruments of comparison. 

The following outline, made and pre- 
sented to the Pedagogy class of last Spring 
term, is brief, pointed, logical, compre- 
hensive. The student may clip and paste 
in book for future study and use. 

KINDS OF REASONING. 

I. Analogical — limited inductive. 

1. Particular to particular. 

2. Two objects similar in several 
known respects are alike in other or all 
respects. 

II. Inductive — synthetic. 

1. Particular to general. 



true 



2. What is true of many is 
of all. 
III. Deductive — analytic. 

1 General to particular. 

2. What is true of all is true of each. 



A Neat College Paper. 

From "The Florin News." 

We recently received a copy of "Our 
College Times," published by the Eliza- 
bethtown College. This is a neat 12-page 
journal, containing many helpful and 
suggestive thoughts, which come from the 
pens of such excellent writers and edu- 
cators as I. N. H. Beahm and others. 
Prof. Beahm is the editor-in-chief, while 
D. C. Reber and Elizabeth Meyer are the 
asssociates; H. K. Ober is the managing 
editor and business manager. The paper 
is issued bi-monthly at 25 cents for six, 
numbers. 



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®m Colleje Cime0. 



"Wisdom is the Principal 27a'H.g." 



Vol. II. 



Elizabethtown, Pa., September, 1905. 



No. 3. 



General Educational Values. 

BY n. C. REBER. 

{Continued from July issue. ) 

This question leads to one closely re- 
lated to it, namely, interest. The idea of 
many-sidedness of interest on the one 
hand has the element of concentration, 
and the element of reflection on the other 
hand, i. e. on the intellectual side. Her- 
bart says that reflection, meaning the act 
of focusing on the contents of conscious- 
ness, is the complement of concentration. 
The products of reflection are system and 
method, which as habits of procedure 
have been already referred to above. The 
aim of all instruction is to produce a 
balanced, many-sidedness of interest 
which may pass into desire and finally 
into volition. When we remember that 
all education is not for the present but 
for the future, and that desire is striving 
always toward some future object, we 
may see that interest in one or several 
subjects has great educational value. 
Stout uses the term conation, meaning a 
striving, or a tendency to develop our 
idea of an object. Apperception is a con- 
ative process. And so it is necessary to 
consider conation in the question of gen- 
eral educational values. 

This many-sided interest has two ob- 
jects — knowledge and sympathy. Di- 
rected towards knowledge, it may be 
spent along three lines, viz: the empiri- 
cal, the speculative, the aesthetic. Di- 
rected towards humanitv it assumes three 



aspects: sympathetic, social, and religious. 
Studies like biology, geography, physical 
training, vocal music, literature, hisLorj'^ 
have a sociological value, since they de- 
velop a social and sympathetic interest. 
Vocal music, literature, history and 
physical training have ethical values. 
Drawing, vocal music, literature, sciences, 
appeal to the beautiful and have an 
aesthetic value, creating an aesthetic 
interest. Mathematics, the sciences, and 
all forms of manual training in the ele- 
mentary stages arouse the empirical in- 
terest. Searching for the causal connec- 
tion of things in studies like astronomy, 
physics, nature study, history begets and 
stimulates an interest in the speculative, 
and, as long as life lasts, never ceases to 
be the "mainspring of intellectual life." 
Prof. Hinsdale denies the dogma of for- 
mal discipline, and attaches little impor- 
tance to general educational values. He 
contends that the mind can not store up 
mechanical energy in a few subjects like 
grammar and mathematics which can be 
need with efhciency in any department of 
life. He argues that the mental power 
acquired by the study of certain branches 
is not mutually convertible. A question 
from the same man follows: "The power 
generated by any kind of mental activity 
must be studied under two aspects— one 
special, and the other general. That the 
power thus generated is far more special 
than general." W. L. Stevens says: 
"Good mental discipline can be acquired 
by the systematic and earnest study of 
any subject whatsoever, if the student has 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES. 



brains, eiitluisiat-in, and skill. Any sub- 
ject may be made a means of li))eral ciil- 
tnre if both teacher and student are stim- 
ulated by the love of knovvledtje." The 
traditional classical course is a thing of the 
past. Its strength lay in the humanities 
or man-subjects which are principally the 
ancient classical lanjiuages. A liberal ed- 
ucation is nevertheless possible by pur- 
suing the modernized course in arts. 

All in all, language is the greatest edu- 
cational and humanizing agent of the 
curriculum, yet the child can not be edu- 
cated adequately by the teaching of lang- 
uage only. Hence we may say with Hins- 
dale that "no one kind of mental exer- 
cise nor few kinds can develop the whole 
mind," yet with our modern idea of a 
liberal education we may be justified in 
holding to the fact that along side with 
special values, every subject, if studied 
with proper spirit and aim, and taught 
with a consciousness of the social ideal, 
and pedagogic methods, possesses general 
educational values. It is this fact alone 
that can redeem education tioni l)ecoming 
one-sided. Specialization can not pro- 
duce unsymmetrical development, if it is 
preceded by a liberal education. The 
philosophy of the new education is mon- 
istic rather than dualistic. The educative 
material must be so correlated, coordi- 
nated, and interrelated that it will yield 
as its product the unfolding, emancipating 
and perfecting of the human spirit. The 
complete man and the unity of man are 
important concepts in educational thought 
to-day. The athlete, the sentimentalist, 
and the pedant are abnormalities educa- 
tionally speaking. The body can not be 
educated without influencing the mind, 
and conversely. Every thought strength- 
ens and vitalizes the body; every whole- 
some exercise of body invigorates the 
spirit. The action of each is carried on 
in terms of the other. Thought can take 
place only in the form of things. Physical 
activity is dependent on thought activity. 
And by way of illustration, modern edu- 
cation maintains that manual training has 



higher objects than to train the hands 
merely, or to supply the world with 
artisans, or to meet the demands of the 
industrial au;e; for these would be ends in 
education, falling far short of the higher 
ideal which education should hold consci- 
ously before itself. Manual training has 
no special or technical end, but rather the 
evolution of the complete life and the 
perfecting of the complete spirit, emo- 
tional, physical, intellectual, social, and 
spiritual. 

The scope of this discussion is limited to 
elementary and secondary education; and 
therefore educational values in the college 
curriculum are touched in this discussion 
only in those studies which are pursued 
farther in the college. And the critical 
discussion of Hinsdale's argument would 
properly belong to an examination of 
values of the studies pursued in the 
college. 

My concluding thought is that there 
are two — and perhaps more — lines for the 
defence of this claim. General educa- 
tional values claim the most consideration 
in prescribing certain courses of study, 
being most important in the correlation 
of studies, while special educational val- 
ues need to be considered in the coordi- 
nation and interrelation of studies. 

{Concluded ) 



De.\r SrBSCRiBERs:— Your subscription 
to Our College Times has made the pub- 
lishing of that little paper possible. 
Most of the subscriptions expire with the 
September number. Will you not 
kindly send in your renewal, together 
with a few new subscribers? If we want 
to continue the publishing of this little 
paper which we have learned to like, we 
must reach 500 subscribers. Send 25c. 
to help us along in this work. The sub- 
scription price is so small that it is within 
the reach of all. U.K. Ober. 



OUR COI.LEGE TIMES. 



Commencement. 

{Continued from July issue.) 

Mr. Sboop's closing remarks were as 
follows: "Another year has passed into 
history. On time's pinions we have been 
borne swiftly and silently to this day 
which mariis the end of a very important 
era in our lives' histories. As long as we 
live we will cherish the memory of this 
day for the pleasant recollections that 
hover about it. The year has been filled 
with many helpful and inspiring influ- 
ences. Sheltered here, we have not felt 
the leaden weight of grief, nor did we 
realize with what rapidity this day was 
approaching — the day when the final 
parting word must be spoken. But we 
could not stop time in its flight, even if 
we would, and we stand here ti) say with 
many pleasant experiences behind us and 
with faces hopefully set toward an un- 
known and unexplored future, beckon- 
ing us on to a world of achievement. 

We now go out from your midst. No 
longer will these halls resound with our 
mingled voices, no more will the bell 
summon us to study or devotion. We 
are assembled for the last time as a class, 
to hear the parting words of those with 
whom we have been associated in the 
past, and by whose kindly sympathies 
and wise counsels we have been directed 
in the paths or knowledge and virtue. 

The shadow of parting is upon us. Let 
the eye and the hand speak the sad fare- 
well the lips refuse to utter. 

To the trustees of this institution we 
wish to return due thanks for their inter- 
est in us and for their devotion to the in- 
stitution whose affairs they regulate, and 
the character of which it is in their pow- 
er to determine. Yours is a noble work. 
History has demonstrated the foundation 
of all government is securely laid only 
when the head and heart of the individ- 
ual member of society are educated in 
harmony. You haye put yourselves on 
record as those who consider the moral 
and spiritual development of man of the 



highest importance. May God prosper 
you in your good work, so that this in- 
stitution may be a power for good, and 
that she may have many sons and daugh- 
ters to rise up and call her blessed. 

To you, members of Faculty, we turn 
with grateful hearts. You have taught 
us to glean sublime truths from the print- 
ed page, and you have opened our eyes 
to behold the wondrous beauties of na- 
ture about us. You have introduced us 
to the great men of the past and have 
enabled us to respond to the heart-throbs 
of poets and authors 

But aboye all you have helped us into 
a more intimate acquaintance with our- 
selves, to understand more perfectly the 
workings of our own minds, and the as- 
pirations of our own hearts, so that to- 
day we realize as never before that we 
are fearfully and wonderfully made. You 
have taught us by precept upon precept 
that character is the purpose and end of 
education, and by example you have 
demonstrated to us that you believe as 
you taught. Finally, your influence up- 
on our lives will never die. Your reward 
comes not in this life and your influence 
will not be revealed until we shall know 
as we are known. 

Classmates, our associations together in 
the past have been very pleasant and 
profitable. We would gladly prolong 
them if we could, but it is ours to bow to 
the inevitable. The sorrow we feel is 
not the sorrow of despair. We may nev- 
er meet here again as the class of 1905. 
While it is hard to say Good-bye, let us 
all breathe fervent, silent prayer that 
when the parting times of earth are over, 
we may all meet in a blissful reunion in 
a land where farewells are never spoken 
and where partings are unknown." 

Pres. Beahm then gave a stirring ad- 
dress to the graduates, pointing them to 
four elements of success, or steps to guide 
them in their life work, which were 
honesty, simplicity, industry and perse- 
verance. Elizabeth Myer. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES. 



€)ur CDUege %imt&. 



EDITORIAL STAFF. 

EDITOR IN chief: 
I. N. H. BEAHM. 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS : 

D. C. REBER, NATHAN MARTIN 

ELIZABETH MEVER 

SPECIAL EDITORS : 

Local Editor, - - - RUTH STAYER 

Society Editor, - - JACOB G. MEYER 

Bl'SINESS MANAGEMENT : 

Managing Editor and Business Manager, 

H. K. OBER 

ASSOCIATES : 

J. Z. HERR, E. ROY ENGLE 

Our College Times is published bi-monthly. 
Subscription price (six numbers) 25 cents, single 
copy 5 cents. 



Enroll ! 

Enter Sept. 4. 

Learn of me. — Jesus. 

We expect new students. 

The new stable is neat and needful. 

Let brotherly love continue. — Paul. 

Sept. 4 is enrolling and organizing day. 

Many have reported "happy vacation." 

Jacob F. Graybill will move to College 
Hill. 

Make up your mind for a year's good 
work. 

Good program to be executed Sept. 4, 
7:30 p. m. 

Brick laying on the new building began 
Aug. 21. 

The Trustees held an important session 
Aug. 10. 

Hearts are beating warm and fast for 
school work to begin. 

This has been an active vacation with 
a number of our faculty. 

The college is very grateful for the con- 
fidence which the public is giving. 



Prof. J. G. Meyer writes good news 
from Little Swatara. 

In school work we learn to give and to 
take — to live and let live. The Social life 
is developed. 

Memorial Hall promises to be a hand- 
some building, though a plain one. 

The better one is educated, the more 
completely he lives, and conversely. 

Dr. Reber's handsome cottage is com- 
pleted. He and his family are cozily 
dwelling therein. 

College Hill, so very quiet for some 
time, is soon to be thoroughly alive, and 
teeming with hope and energy. 

The college has been thoroughly 
cleaned — washed and scoured from top to 
bottom. Thanks to the good workers ! 

Miss Ruth Stayer came to Elizabeth- 
town August 19, but too late to take up 
her duties as local editor for this issue. 

The Trustees decided to name the new 
building "Memorial Hall." This name 
will be cut on the date stone and placed 
just over the front entrance. 

The present college building will re- 
ceive a special name. If you have one to 
suggest, send it to S. H. Hertzler, chair- 
man of the committee on name. 

Jacob Z. Herr speaks most highly of 
the Zanerian Art College, where he has 
spent his vacation. Well, Prof. Herr, 
we expect you to do just as well here. 

A good program is arranged for 9:00 
a. m., Sept. 5. The public is invited ! 
The chief address will be given by Bro. 
A. L. B. Martin. Be sure to hear him ! 

"It is an ill wind that blows nobody 
good." It is likely a good thing that the 
work on Memorial Hall has been delayed. 
For at a late day it was decided to use 
the pressed brick for all outside finish. 
Are we not glad we had the delay ? 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES. 



Chas. Bower, the young deacon from 
Lancaster, is successor to Bro. Reber in 
the college cottage. He has assisted in 
the canvass, and in arranging and setting 
things in order about the college. He 
will be a new student. 

On account of our local editor's; being 
absent during vacation, the editor-in-chief 
asked Dr. Reber to write up the successes 
of our students in the securing of posi- 
tions. His article is quite complete and 
makes a fine showing for Elizahethtown 
College. 

Prof, and Mrs. Wampler are one. But 
they will be two in teaching. Earnest, 
grave yet cheerful, energetic and efficient, 
their work under such favorable union 
and conditions sliouid prove a blessing to 
the college. "Our College Times" joins 
in wishing them joy and prosperity ! 

The Auditing Committee, T. F. Imler, 
J. H. Eshelman, and A. N. Martin did 
their work well and reported the college 
books in Prof. Ober's charge to be in ex- 
cellent order and correctness. In this 
day af corruption and graft the college is 
all the more anxious to have everything 
carefully examined. Thanks to the aud- 
iting committee for their prompt services ! 

The new building has not been prom- 
i.«ed at any fixed date. It was hoped, 
however, that it woul(i be under roof by 
Sept. 4. But on account of some impor- 
tant lumber having gone astray, and the 
preoccupation of the brick layers, the 
work has been delayed. Bro. GrofF and 
Bro. Heisey are pushing it hence forward, 
l^et us rejoice that it is coming, and let us 
wait patiently, and work while we wait. 



Invest. 

Going to school with the right motive 
and application is not sjJending money. 
It is investing it. What better investment 
can one make than to invest in himself — 
in personal preparation for life ? Now is 
the time to invest ! 



Notes. 

Miss Anna Heisey has been employed 
to teach Young's school in Mount Joy 
township. On being asked a question 
about the salary, she answered, "I want 
to make friends, teach a good school, and 
pay my board." Her ambition seems not 
to be accompanied by avarice, but rather 
by a desire to prove faithful to duty — a 
commendable quality of a teacher. 

John M. Miller, '05, took a trip through 
the N. E. States this summer in the inter- 
ests of the mouse and rat trap factory of 
Lititz, Pa. Many thanks for souvenir 
post cards received from him. 

Lydia M. Buckwalter, '05, while on a 
trip to Mont. Co., took dinner on Aug. 2, 
at the home of Prof. Chas. Calvert Ellis, 
in Perkiomenville. 

Prof, and Mrs. Ober's visit to the Con- 
estoga congregation was much enjoyed. 
We trust that the seeds sown during this 
visit will yield bountiful harvests, both 
in the religious and educational field. 
Elizabeth Mver. 



Educational Programs. 

MONDAY, SEPT. 4, 7:30 p. M. 

Address of Welcome, - D. C. Reber. 
Value of a Good Letter. Nathan Martin. 
Educational Value of A Igebra, P. S. Davis. 
Honesty in Student Life, - J. G. Meyer. 
Recitation, - - Luella Fogelsanger. 
The Human Voice, - B. F. Wampler. 
Address, - Pastor C. I. Behney. 

TUESD.W, SEPT. 5, 9 A. M. 

A Definite Purpose, - - Miss Myer. 
The Beautiful, - - Mrs. Wampler. 
The Student's Program, - H. K. 01:)er. 
Penmanship - - - J. Z. Herr. 
Signs of the Times, - I. N. H. Beahm. 
Address, - - - A. L. B. Martin. 

Music arranged and directed by B. F. 
Wampler. 

Public cordially invited. 



OUR COLLEGK TIMES. 



COLLEGE NOTES. 

From llie KlizHbctlilowii Cliruiiicle, Aiij;. 1^. 

Yes, school opens .September 4. Lo()k 
out f(ir the opening projirains. 

Profs. Rel)er, Oher and Beahm were a- 
way preachinfj last Sunday. The first in 
Big Swatara conirrogation, the fecond in 
Little Swatara and the last in Caroline 
county, Md. 

The bricklayers have now begun work 
on the new building. It is hoped that 
some important lumber which wentastray 
and was recently found in Richmond, 
Va. will be on hand soon. Then we may 
hope for progress. 

Prospects point to a favorable opening. 
EiUication is widely demanded these 
days. People are waking up to the situ- 
ation. Let many of the young folk of 
Elizabethtown and vicinity be ready to 
enter at the opening, Sept. 4. 

Miss Good our music teacher and Prof. 
Wampler our vocalist were united in the 
holy bonds of matrimony August 9, at 
Bridgewater, Virginia. The high con- 
tracting parties expect to be at home on 
College Hill after August 24. They will 
devote their energies to the furtherance 
of the college work. May peace, plenty 
and power crown their matrimonial 
alliance. 

The new college stable was quick work. 
It adds a much needed convenience. The 
shed will be about wholly available to 
the public now. ]Much gratitude is ex- 
tended to friends who by their contribu- 
tions made it possible to erect a neat lit- 
tle barn. Each one contributing will re- 
ceive in due time a receipt from the col- 
lege treasurer and a credit on the college 
books for the donation made. Then the 
committee will have an honorable dis- 
charge. Again, and in conclusion, 
thanks to the subscribers to the stable 
f u n d . 

Profs. Reber, Ober, and Wampler have 
done active field work. 



National Educational Association. 

It was the pleasure of the editor to at- 
tend the \. E. A., in Asbury Park, N. J., 
during July. Among the rarest treats of 
the occasion were the addresses on "Child 
Study" by Dr. Stanley Hall, President of 
Clarke University, Worcester, Mass., and 
the foTty-minute address of President 
Rfmsevelt to 10,000 teachers in the beaut- 
iful Ocean Grove Auditorium. 

The N. E. A. always shows the high 
water mark of Pedagogic Science. 

Our own Dr. N. C. Schaeffer was elected 
president of the N. E. A., a glowing trib- 
ute to the Keystone Slate. The Doctor 
will Jill the office. Some men are too 
small to till an office. John Temple 
Graves says they rattle therein. Not so 
with our State Superintendent. He will 
magnify his office. 

Keystone Literary Society. 

EXECITIVE SESSION, FRID.VY, SEIT. 8. 

INIusic. 

Declamation, - - - J. Z. Herr. 

Essay, - - - Miss Mary Hees. 

Reff^rred Question — What is the condi- 
tion of the Indian to-dav? 

H. Z. Bittner. 

Debate — Resolved, That the books w« 
read exert a greater influence upon us 
than our associates. Aff — J. G. Meyer, 
Miss Hartman. Neg. — Nathan Martin, 
Miss Wenger. 

Music. 

Recitation, - - Miss Carrie Hess. 

Question Box. 

Music. 

C. S. LivEXGooD, Pres. 



Our president, I. N. H. Beahm, spent 
over two weeks on a South-westerly tour. 
U ithin one week he delivered ten dis- 
couises, traveling and canvassing. Many 
letters urge him to work less. Though he 
does the work of Steward and largely of 
Business Manager, yet he is expected to 
lead in thought and responsibility. Still 
he may risk several classes from Sept. 4. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES. 



COLLEGE NOTES. 

From tlic Elizabethtowii Chronicle, Aug. 25. 

The pump-house is to be moved. 

A large range is to be placed in the 
eollejj;e kitchen. 

Prospects for the approaching session 
are encouraging. 

Prof. VVampler arrived on College Hill 
Aug. 23, bright and happy. 

Pastor B. M. Meyer and his niece Miss 
Elizabeth Meyer, of Rohrerstown, Pa., 
called on College Hill Aug. 23. 

W. P. Cummings of Lancaster will in- 
stall the heating plant in Memorial Hall. 
It is to have ample capacity for both 
buildings. 

There is, ceteris paribus, a bright 
future for the school that proves intense 
loyalty to the Brotherhood. It is hoped 
that all will. Thus the Colleges among 
our people will serve a great mission. 

Sister Arnold, wife of late Eld- C. E. 
Arnold, of McPherson. Kansas, with her 
daughter Ruth, was recently the guest of 
her brother on College Hill. She was de- 
lighted with the place and country and 
people. 

The college is very appreciative of the 
attitude of mind the business men of 
Elizabethtown manifest toward our 
school. The president of the cfillege de- 
sires especially to express his gratitude to 
our business men. 

Exchange Department. 

Among our exchanges is an interesting 
publication, "Our College Rays," issued 
by The Maryland Collegiate Institute, 
Union Bridge, Md. It was our pleasure 
a few weeks ago to have with us its editor- 
in-chief. Prof. D. Owen Cottrell. The 
sermon with which he favored us, 
as well as the arrangement and general 
spirit of the paper of which he has charge 
gives evidence of practical views of life, 
consecration to the cause of Christian 
education, and earnest zeal for the Mas- 
ter's work, in its youthful messenger. 



Prof. L. E. Rees, of Mt. Morris College, 
gives the following as the principal ben- 
efits of Latin study. 

1. It improves one's English. 

2. It furnishes mental training. 

3. It puts one in touch with the old 
classic writers. 

We are all interested in success. We 
would all rather succeed than fail. Suc- 
cessful undertakings, especially when ac- 
complished under discouraging circum- 
stances — successful men who, in spite of 
trials and hardships, have struggled on 
until they attained the crown they now 
wear in their present station or calling — 
these engage the attention of every nor- 
mal mind. 

One of the best definitions of this ill- 
understood and much-abused term we 
have noticed recently is from an exchange: 
"Success is happiness in well-doing and 
well-being, with no thought of mammon 
or power." This has much of the ring of 
Paul's language, "But godliness with con- 
tentment is great gain." 

"Have you a friend you would like to 

have in school ? Send him the ( ) 

for a year." This expresses a fellow;-in- 
stitution's belief in the fact that acquaint- 
ance with the workings of a school will 
make friends of those who become 
acquainted with a good school. Good 
enough to recommend. If you are anx- 
ious to know what we are doing, or 
would like to keep others informed on 
happenings here, we suggest our bi- 
monthly letter, "Our College Times " 
Nathan Martix. 



A Good Word. 

From the Gospel Messenger. 

Bro. B. F. Wampler, instructor of music 
at Elizabethtown, Pa., College, is at this 
time with us, teaching a class in singing. 
It is much enjoyed by all. The professor 
is a fine instructor. Though but a young 
man, he understands music well and 
possesses the ability of instilling it into 
others. — T. F. Imler, Noristown, Pa., 
July 14. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES. 



On the Wing. 

July 18, Chas. liower and a member of 
the faculty started on a canvapsing tour 
traveling with the college team. The 
journey extended through two states and 
tive counties of Pa. viz: Lancaster, York, 
Adams, Cumberland, and Dauphin. The 
route included the following points of 
interest: Rheems, Florin, Mt. Joy, .Mount- 
ville, Columbia, Wrightsville, Hellam, 
York, Loganville, Tolna, New Freedom, 
Lineboro, Md., Black Rock, Shrewsbury, 
Seven Valleys, Spring Grove, Menges 
Mill, Hanover, Abbottstown, Bigmount, 
East Berlin, New Oxford, Gettysburg, 
Heidlersburg, York Springs, Dills))urg, 
Brandtsville, Boiling S{)rings, Shepherds- 
town, Mechanicsburg, Bowmansdale, 
Harrisburg, Steelton, Highspire and 
Middletown. Nine public religious serv- 
ices, including four sermons, were partici- 
pated in. 

Among the former students visited are 
H. C. Keller, Tolna; Jacob E. Myers, 
Glen Rock; Daniel K. Marks, Seven 
Valleys; John G. Miller, Lineboro, Md.; 
Kurwin D. Henrv, Bigmount; John E. 
Harlacher, East Berlin. These with 
many friends and prospective students of 
the college received us kindly and enter- 
tained us hospitably. Among those de- 
serving special mention are Eld H. E. 
Light, Mountville; I. N. Mupser, Colum- 
bia; Eld. J. A. Long, York; Wm. Trim- 
mer, York; Eld. D. Y. Brill hart, York; 
Jacob Myers, Glen Rock; Jos. Marks, 
Seven Valleys; Prof. J. H. Keller, Tolna; 
Eld. E. S. Miller, Lineboro, Md.; Benj. 
F. Bowser, New Freedom; Eld. M. Mum- 
mert, Menges Mill; E. Babylon, Hanover; 
Eld. Orville Long, Hanover; Eld. E. 
Gochenauer, Bigmount; John Bosserman, 
East Berlin; Geo. Henry, Bigmount; 
Andrew Bowser, East Berlin; Eld. C. L. 
Baker, East Berlin; Eld. Henry Beelnian, 
Dillsbnrg; Eld. Levi Mohler, Dillsburg; 
J. E. Hollinger, Mooredale. On July 31, 
we returned home, leaving Mr. Bower 
with his family at his father-in-law's, 
Eld. Beelman, near Dillsburg. The tiip 



was enjoyable and [trofitable. Catalogues 
and other advertising matter were distrib- 
uted, and the future only will tell what 
was accomplished in the way of patronage 
and support for our school. About one 
dozen student.s are expected for the ])res- 
ent year as a result of the canvass. 

D. C. R. 

Sad. 

Death has begun his work on our 
student body. Sister Anna Neff, of Ship- 
pensburg died recently of a lingering 
illness. She was an amiable christian 
woman. After attending College at Eliz- 
abettitown, she accepted a position in 
Carlisle, which she filled well till the time 
of her illness. 

Bro. Walter Kittinger of Philadelphia 
enrolled Nov. 1.3, 1900 at the founding or 
opening of the college. He was one of 
the pioneer students and one of the 
"memorable six." For some time his 
health had been declining. He lost his 
sight, and grew worse till the last sum- 
mons came. 

These bereaved homes have the sym- 
pathies of Our College Times. 

May the tender mercies of God heal 
the bleeding hearts ! 

"Religion is the ehief eoncern 

Of mortals here below ; 
May I its great importance learn, 

It.s sovcieign virtues know." 



A Good Life. 

Brother i^braham Heisey past 90 years 
of age who often visited the college and 
always addressed the students, died Aug. 
1.1, and was buried at the Conoy church, 
Aug. 18. The funeral was very large. 
Truly a good man, a staunch citizen, a 
faithful christian, and an exemplary 
brother has )>assed away. He let his 
light shine brightly. The ripe sheaf is 
garnered. The aged saint i? gathered 
unto his fathers. 



Let every one who can, enter at the 
opening of the session, Sept. 4. 



OUR COIXEGE TIMES. 



A Good Handwriting. 

That there is more poor than ^ood 
writing in the world at the present time, 
no one will dispute. As a matter of fact 
we know that people in general do not 
write poorly intentionally, but are unable 
to write well. The question may then 
arise, Why are people unable to write 
better? This question may be answered 
by taking in consideration three things, 
any one of which will seriously interfere 
with a good handwriting. 

The first of these three things is the 
teaching of children before they are old 
enough to learn correctly. This of itself 
lays the foundation of poor writing, be- 
cause it encourages and develops two 
evils — excessive finger movement and 
gripping. 

The second reason why people write 
I)Oorly is that the forms heretofore taught 
were too complex for the majority to 
acquire and execute. Writing must be 
suited to the natural ability of the many 
rather than to the few. 

The third reason why people write 
poorly is that the arm movement train- 
ing was neglected, except by the few 
who have attended a school of penman- 
ship or a commercial school, and received 
instructions from a professional penman. 
Where finger movement and gripping 
have become a habit, it requires a special 
effort to overcome these evils. 

Good writing is that which is easily 
read, and easily and rapidly executed. 
It needs to be simple in construction, 
normal in slant, and natural in action in 
order to be easy and rapid. Some people 
come to a conclusion that a good hand 
writing can only be acquired by those 
who are talented in the artistic line, but 
it has been proven that all can learn lo 
write well who are not deformed, and 
who are willing to follow the instructions 
and practice correct copies in successive 
order. Nothing is more attractive and 
pleasing to the eye than a page of good 
handwriting. 



The worth of a good hand writing can- 
not accurately be estimated, but its pos- 
sessor finds it a ready and valued servant 
at all times, as well as a stepping stone to 
something better and higher. All other 
things being equal, the one possessing a 
good hand writing gets the desired posi- 
tion, while the one who writes poorly 
loses it. Its greatest worth, however, 
cannot be measured in dollars and cents, 
as it is a constant aid in acquiring, ex- 
pressing, and recording information, 
being cultural as well as practical. More- 
over it is a life companion, ever ready to 
help if it is good, or to hinder if it is bad, 
in the struggle for advancement and 
success. The price of a good hand writ- 
ing is not talent but toil. Of course to 
become a masterful penman, takes talent 
as well as toil. A good handwriting is as 
essential to our education as mathematics 
or English. 

One can in a few months learn to write 
such a hand that writing ever thereafter 
will be a pleasure and benefit. Now is 
the time to begin. Be wise to-day and be 
a good penman. Jacob Z. Herr. 



Successful Undergraduates. 

The following students of Elizabethtown 
College during the last year, are licensed 
to teach and have secured positions: 
W. (j. Baker, Anna M. Heisey, Mary F. 
Heisey, Minnie (J. Heisey, Emma G. 
Ginder, Minnie C. Ginder, Amos P. Geib, 
Naomi P. White, Mazie R. Martin, Clay- 
ton R. Frey, am] R. W. Schlosser, in 
Lancaster county; Tillie L. Booser, Anna 
E. Gruber, May E. Gross, Effie L. Shank, 
and Anna Morning, in Dauphin county; 
Sue E. Buckwalter, in Clinton county. 
Abram H. Martin, a student of 1904, will 
teach in Conoy township, Lancaster 
county. Bigler M. Singer, a commercial 
student is a time clerk for a Traction 
Company in York county. D. C. R. 



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OUR COLLEGE TIMES. 



The Cla«8 of l905"Where? 

C. W. Shoop, the firpt graduate in the 
college preparatory course, will enter 
the Freshman class in Lebanon Valley 
College at Annville this Fall. 

Lydia M Buck waiter, graduate in the 
Teachers' course, accepted a $50 per 
month position in the schools of Patton, 
Cambria county,' for nine months. 
. Mary E. Hertzler, another graduate in 
Pedagogy, will teach the Nissley school, 
near Middletown. 

Jacob G. Meyer, of the Teachers' course 
and Jacob Z. Herr, of the English Hcien- 
titic course, enter the faculty at EHza- 
bethtown September 4th. 

Elizabeth A. Zortman, who also com- 
pleted the Teachers' course, expects to 
be with her aged mother in Elizabeth- 
town, and may pursue a few studies 
along Biblical lines at the college. 

E. Blanche Fisher, an English ^Scienti- 
fic graduate, will devote her time during 
the next year to the study of music in 
her alma mater. 

The grammar school at Mount Joy will 
be presided over by another graduate of 
the English Scientific course, .Mary B. 
Hess. Hers is an eight months' position 
at $45 per month. 

Minerva E. Stauffer, of the English 
Scientific course, and Elizabeth Kline, of 
the Commercial course, fill clerical posi- 
tions in the office of the Kreider Shoe 
Factory, of Elizabethtown. 

C. J. Hanft, of Keyser, Md., after com- 
pleting the English Scientific course, re- 
resumes his work as teacher at his home. 

Rapho township, Lancaster county, has 
again secured the services of I. E. Ober- 
holtzer, a graduate of the English Scien- 
tific course, for the coming year. 

The other graduates of the Commercial 
department have positions as follows : I. 
E. Shoop will be in the employ of Prof. 
H. K. Ober ; W. K. Gish and Ada M. 
Little expect to return to college to pur- 
sue a literary course ; Opal Hoflfman is a 
clerk in Hertzler Bros. & Co's store in 



Elizabethtown ; J. H. Brcitigan and J. 
M. .Miller still hold positions at I^ititz, 
which they secured about six months 
ago ; J. H. Stayer was successful in ob- 
taining a good position in Altoona ; Ira 
G. Myers fills a position in Harrisburg; 
A. A. Hertzler is a book-keeper in Chi- 
cago ; E. H. Lehman is still in the West; 
D. L. Landis has a clerical position at 
Manheim, but is considering the matter 
of returning to school again for advanced 
studies; Geo. H. Light will teach an un- 
graded school in East Lampeter township, 
Lancaster county, and among other things 
expects to give instruction in the German 
language; M. J. Hollada is a bookkeeper 
in Somerset countv. D. C. R. 



The teachers are ready for good service 
the approaching session. 



I B. C. GROFF & SON i 

I CONTRACTORS AND * 

5 BUILDERS, » 

» • 

I Coal, Grain, Feed, * 

% Lumber and Stone I 

» « 

% ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. t 

« « 



JOS. D. HOLLINGER 

MANUFACTrUER OF 

Home-made Tinware, 
Spouting, Etc. 

Dealer in 

Stoves, Heaters and Furnaces 

Roofing and Tin Roof Painting a Specialty. 
Coal Oil and Gasoline. 



D. H. 7V^ A R T I N 

Clothing and Gents' Furnishings 

Centre Square, Elizabethtown, Pa. 



A. W. Martin 

COAL, WOOD, GRAIN 
FLOUR AND FEED 

Telephone. 

Elizabethtown^ Penna* 

GEO. D. BOGCS & SON 



DEALERS IN 



STOVES, RANGES, 
HOUSEFURNISHING GOODS, 

AND A FULL LINE OF 

HARDW^ARE 

Call to see us, we will supply your wants. 
S. Market St., Elizabethtown, Pa. 

H* S; Hottenstein 

CABINET-MAKER 

AND UNDERTAKER 

A full line of FURNITURE always 
on hand. Call to see me. My lines will 
please you. Undertaking carefully at- 
tended to. 

Elizabethtown, Pa. 

J. RALPH GRDSS 

SHAVING AND HAIRCUTTINQ 

PARLOR 

Hair Singeing a Specialty 

S. Market St., ELIZABETHTOWN. 



ICE CREAM, 

SODA WATER 

Fine Line of Confections always on hand. 

MEALS AT ALL HOURS 



The Enlarged 

BOOK STORE 

Means Better Service. 

CALL TO SEE ME. 

G. N. Falkenstein 

Books, Stationery and School Supplies 
Elizabethtown, Pa. 

O-ise & IvdloBricie 



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Page Wire Fence a Specialty. 
FARM IMPLEMENTS 

AGENTS FOR 

New Holland Gasoline Engines, Universal 
Plows, Grain Drills, Owego Wagons, Etc. 

ELIZABETHTOWN, Pfl. 

HARRY MILLER 
Cabinet A/laker and Undertaker 

A FULL LINE OF FURNITURE 
S. Market St., Elizabethtown, Pa. 



THE ETXGLE LAWN SiAZiNG 

Built to Accommodate Four Passengers. Write For Booklet and Prices 

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of eteel, with 
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of the plats in 
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The most 
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ing motion of 
any swing in- 
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Sold entirely 
on its merits. 
Manufactured by A.. BXJCEIS SOISTS CO.. E5LIZABETHTOWN, FA. 





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WEAVER ^fi^l 

EASY TO OPERATE 
MARDTOWEAROUT 

Writk For Catalogue and Pricks to the 



J-jA.lSrOA.STHIR. W^.A.R.ER.OOjyES 



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WEAVER OKGA/N 3c PIA/NO COMPA/Ng. 
ALL THE NEWS IN THE 

Elizabethto\vn Chronicle 

ONLY THE BEST JOB PRINTING 
.1 N ni WFII FR (I()OD VALUES, EXCELLENT WORKMANSHIP, HONEST PRICES. 

U. II. ULfTLILLH This represents our (MJ)TI1I.\<; and SIIOH.'^, 

as well as all otlu-r liin's 

AGENT FDR LEBANON STEAM LAUNDRY 
J. N OLWEILER, g,'E°N^|*'^5Rft[s°HER ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



®nx College Cimeis. 



^'Wisdom is the Principal Tiling.^'' 



Vol. II. 



Elizabethtown, Pa., November, 1905. 



No. 4. 



When Is One Educated ? 

Time is an important consideration in 
all growth and therefore it necessarily is 
involved in obtaining one's education. 
This question puzzles many young people 
and often enters as a determining factor 
in deciding which school to attend or 
which course of study to select. And 
here is just where a mistake is frequently 
made. Hence a word of caution and 
advice is relevant. 

Education is a matter that can not be 
hurried. God takes a month or two to 
grow a pumpkin, but a century to pro- 
duce the giant of the forest. The com- 
plete growth and development of the 
human body requires from twenty to 
twenty-five years. The human brain has 
been known to develop until the age of 
thirty-three or even forty. Hence it is 
not advisable to undertake a course of 
study at forty or fifty, because the nerv- 
ous system no longer possesses the quality 
of acquiring new habits or breaking up 
old ones. 

The best time for getting an education 
is from childhood to adolescence, i. e. the 
first twenty or thirty years of life. Jesus 
of Nazareth entered upon his life's work 
at thirty, after having spent about eigh- 
teen years in direct preparation for it. 
Taking this as the ideal, the time required 
to be educated depends upon the char- 
acter of the work you choose to do and 
upon the quality of the service you wish 
to render. If you are satisfied to work 
with material things, that is to follow a 



menial or manual pursuit, and aim to do 
that work only ordinarily well, your train- 
ing will take a year or two. But if God 
has called you to train souls for eternity 
in the station of teacher or minister, that 
is, to deal with the immortal, and to labor 
for Him and not for self only, you will 
need a decade or more of preparation 
surrounded by the best possible environ- 
ment, guided by correct ideals, and taught 
by the Great Teacher himself. To live 
the complete life you need a development 
of hand, head and heart, and you are not 
ideally and completely educated until 
that standard has been approximately 
attained. The ideal life consists in ren- 
dering the most efficient service in eternal 
interests of humanity. D. C. R. 



The Fall Opening. 

The opening of the Fall Term was an 
auspicious occasion. The returning of 
old students and the goodly number of 
new ones, with the piospects of a good 
year's work, made the occasion hopeful 
and enjoyable. 

The address by Pastor C. I. Behney, of 
Elizabethtown, was one evincing much 
effort and thought. It abounded in 
graphic portrayal and wholesome inspira- 
tion. The address on Tuesday morning 
by Pastor A. L. B. Martin, oi Harrisburg, 
Pa., on cheerfulness, was rich and juicy. 
The speaker was in the spirit of the sub- 
ject and his talk was well received as 
usual. Each teacher had his say and the 
programs were interesting throughout. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES. 



For the College Times. 

The first year of Elizal)Htlito\vn ColletiP, 
under tfie management of tlieadministra- 
tive Committee, wdiich has? just closed has 
been very satisfactory in every respect. 
Brethren Beahni, Reber and Ober, who 
constitute the committee, have proven 
themselves altogetlier worthy of the con- 
fidence that the trustees had in them, and 
have clearly demonstrated that they are 
able for the duties that thus devolve 
upon them. In adding a new department 
and some much needed equipment and also 
increasing the teaching force very materi- 
ally, the Committee ehowed a spirit of 
progression and expansion for the insti- 
tution that appeared unjustifiable to the 
timid an<i the weak in faith. But the 
result has demonstrated the wisdom of 
the course, surpassing even the expecta- 
tions of our most hopeful friends. 

The first and most gratifying result is 
the increase in interest and patronage 
whicli is so manifest upon every hand, 
when the growth of the school proved the 
need of a new building. The demand 
was met with subscription for the re- 
quired amount with a promptness that is 
marvelous, all things considered. The 
second result, also very essential, is that 
notwithstanding the above outlay of con- 
siderable proportions, the running of the 
school shows a small surplus in its finan- 
cial statement. 

The president and the members of the 
Committee and the matron, sister 
Beahm, all deserve much credit for this 
result. Let us rally around the manage- 
ment of our College. They work bard 
and sacrifice much, and have succeeded 
remarkably, and we want them to do 
better. So shall the College prosper. 
God will be glorified and we will all be 
happy. Jesse Ziegler. 

This good article came too late for Sept. i.ssue. 



Our faculty meetings have been render- 
ed quite interesting by the reading of 
critical papers from time to time by 
teachers respectively. 



Memorial Hall. 

Memorial Hall is progressing and it is 
lioi)ed it may be dedicated during the 
special Bible Term in January. When- 
ever the dedication comes off, make 
arrangement to attend. It will be a good 
time to visit the College — a date of historic 
interest. Many people are interested in 
this new building, and it will jjrove a 
great help to the institution. 

It is expected that the special Bible 
Term will be held in the new building. 
Full announcements regarding the dedi- 
cation services and the complete program 
of the Bible Term will be issued later, 
but in due time, prior to these occasions. 

All those who expect rooming at the 
College during the special Term, please 
write D. C. Reber, Retjistrar, early, for a 
room. The prospects are we can accom- 
modate many more people than ever 
before; but let us hear from you in time. 
Write for your room. 

To Our Alumni and Old Students. 

Nothing is more gratifying to the man- 
agement of the school than the manifesta- 
tions of sympathy and approval of our 
work on the [-art of our alumni and old 
students. The success of the school 
largely depends on the encouragement 
and support of those who have been here 
and are now engaged in various occupa- 
tions in different parts of the State. 

Thissupport is appreciated by trustees 
and faculty and its continuance is solicited. 
Send us students; send us names of 
young persons who think of becoming 
students; send us names of parents with 
children to send away to school. We 
shall continue to do the best work that 
we can, and to take as good care as pos- 
sible of those who come to this institution. 

Let us hear of your whereabouts, your 
success, and any experiences which may 
be of interest to the readers of Our Col- 
lege Times. E. M. 



Subscribe for "Our College Times.' 



OUR COIvIvEGE TIMES. 



An Interesting Letter. 

Springs, Pa., Oct. 17, 1905. 
Prof. Beahm, Elizabethtown, Pa., 

Dear Brother:—! have not heard from 
school for some time. How is everything ? 

I am convalescent. Expect to be in 
school again in ten or twelve days, prob- 
ably two weeks. It is a little hard to tell 
just how fast I will gain strength. Just a 
few days ago 1 fainted when father and 
brother raised me to put me in a chair. 
But next time it went better, and since 
that time the doctor has been here, he 
raised me out of bed and supporting most 
of my weight himself he made me walk a 
few steps. I can now walk just a little 
myself. 1 am very weak. 

I hope I shall never get typhoid again. 
It's a dreadful disease. 

I lost in weight, 30 pounds. You may 
imagine how my clothes fit. My hat is 
the only piece of apparel that seems to 
have the right size. 

1 am moving along cautiously and hope 
to gain my former strength before long. 

My greatest concern before the fever 
had left me was about my work at school. 
Father tried to assure me that all would 
be managed by you, and that I should 
not worry. It was only by very careful 
attention that I got along so rapidly. 

How is the new building getting on ? 
Tell me all about it, please. 

Give my good wishes to the school. 

I will close, hoping everything is mov- 
ing along smoothly, I am 

Yours fraternally, 

P. S. Davis. 



Books. 

The College Library is growing. It is 
supervised by an efficient committee. 
Dr. D. C. Reber is chairman of the com- 
mittee. Any books that you may wish 
to present to the College, or any dona- 
tions yon may wish to make to the 
library, should be promptly addressed to 
the chairman. Any and all help you 
may give him, the chairman, or to the 
whole committee, will be appreciated. 



The College Note Book. 

Miss Lydia Buck waiter reports "every- 
thing going just fine" in her school-work 
at Patton, Cambria Co., Pa. On a rainy 
Wednesday not long ago, she had her 
pupils, who are eight and nine years of 
age, sing "Let a Little Sunshine In," and 
soon a boy raised his hand and said,. 
"Miss B — ., now the sun is going to 
shine." 

Miss Anna G ruber called on Miss Myer, 
Thursday evening, Oct. 19. She wields 
the teachers' wand over twenty pupils at 
the Hertzler School in Conewago Twp., 
Dauphin Co. Misses Tillie Booser and 
Anna Morning are employed as teachers 
in the same township. 

Miss Mary Hertzler is spoken of in the 
Middletown Journal, as "a live, wide- 
awake, progressive teacher." The 
Journal further says, "a fine second-hand 
organ was installed in Nissley's school- 
house due to her influence. 

The committee on Alumni Constitution 
met at the home of Mrs. Frank GroflF in 
October, and a considerable amount of 
work was done on the new coustitution. 

Let the Alumni all be ready for its 
adoption next June. 

Misses Sue Buckwalter and AnnaCassel 
are both teaching near Perkiomenville, 
Mont. Co., and are rooming together at 
their boarding place. Anyone wishing to 
know what to do with a timid beginner, 
write to Miss Sue. 

Miss May Gross resigned her school at 
Ebersole's in Dauphin Co., to accept a 
position lately created in Elizabethtown 
borough schools. 

Miss Elizabeth Zortman is taking Bible 
and other Post-Graduate work at College. 

E. M. 



The box of soap sent prepaid by Bro. 
Samuel Gibhie of Lancaster, compliments 
of the Miller Soap Co., was distributed 
aniony; the faculty and students. A vote 
of thanks to the firm. 



OUR COIvLEGE TIMEvS. 



€)ur College Cimes. 



EDITORIAL STAFF. 

EDITOK IN CHIEF : 
I. N. H. BKAHM. 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS : 

D. C. REBER, NATHAN MARTIN 

ELIZABETH MEYER 

SPECIAL EDITORS : 

Local Editor, - - - RUTH STAYER 

Society Editor, - - JACOB G. MEYER 

BUSINESS MANAGEMENT : 

Managing Editor and Business Manager, 

H. K. OBER 

ASSOCIATES: 
J. Z. HERR, E. ROY ENGLE 

Our College Times is published bi-monthly. 
Subscription price (six numbers) ^5 cents, single 
copy 5 cents. 



Prof. Davis is recovering. 
College Hill is a busy place. 
Monday, Dec. 4, Winter Term opens. 

Jno. Z. Herr has accepted a position in 
Lebanon. 

Mr. Martin is doing good work with 
shorthand. 

A number have promised to enroll for 
Winter Term. 

Many nice remarks are made about 
Memorial Hall. 

Prospects for an increased enrollment 
are encouraging. 

Miss Fogelsanger is busy with the 
typewriting work. 

Profs. Meyer and Herr are progressing 
in their new spheres of labor. 

Profs. Reber, Ober and Elizabeth Myer 
are doing as ever — efficient work. 

The music department is growing. 
Profs. Wampler are enthusing it. 

Today, Octoher 23, there are 15 iren 
working on Memorial Hall. The brick- 
work is nearing completion. The Man- 
sard studding are being set. We take 
courage, but many strokes are yet re- 
quired to finish. 



Prof. Davis was taken sick, and repaired 
to his home at Springs, Somerset county, 
Pennsylvania, where he has been "laid 
up" for many weeks. His private letter 
of recent date explains the matter in such 
manner that we assume to pul)lish it. We 
are pleased that he is recovering rapidly, 
and hopes to return soon. Life and 
health are greatly enhanced in value by 
illness. 

W E. Glasmire, who came from North 
Dakota, covered more miles than any 
other student to reach the College, until 
the coming of Domingo Dikit, a choice 
Philippino of seventeen years, who 
arrived in the early part of October, and 
is now ahead of any one else regarding 
the distance from home. But twelve or 
thirteen thousand miles seems not to 
embarrass him. 

Next special Bible Term opens Jan. 8. 
It lasts only two weeks. Make up your 
mind now to take the whole of it in. 
Start in the beginning. The term will be 
one of great activity from start to finish. 
Elder J. K. Miller, of Brooklyn, New 
York, will be the chief attraction of the 
term. We are having considerable home 
talent, however, which should give ex-> 
cellent service. Remember, only two 
weeks. 



A Good Feature. 

Quite generally at the "chapel exer- 
cises" current news is given. History 
that is going on just now is perhaps 
just as important as remote events. 
History is not history unless seen through 
living fact. The emphasis put upon cur- 
rent history now-a-days by educators is 
right. We know the past only as we 
know the presnt. It is also true too that 
we know the present as we know the 
past. Current events therefore are inval- 
uable to the student. 



Profs. Reber and Wampler with their 
wives attended Children's Service at 
Hanoverdale Oct. 22. 



OUR COLI.EGE TIMES. 



Locals. 



BY R. S. 



Miss Leah Shaeffer, of Bareville, spent 
Sunday, Oct. 1 at her home. 

Miss Nellie Hartman has done excellent 
work as editor of the l^iterary Echo. 

Mrs. J. F. Grayhill, though small in 
stature, is the life of the culinary depart- 
ment. 

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Kauffman, of Gap, 
Pa., visited the College, Thursday, Oct. 
12, as the guests of Miss Hallie Campbell. 

Mr. Geo. H. Light, a teacher in East 
I^ampeter township, Lancaster Co., visited 
friends on College Hill, Sept. 30tb and 
31st. 

Miss Elizabeth Kline, '05, has again 
enrolled as a student at the College. She 
is now pursuing the Music Teachers' 
Course. 

Miss Sallie A. Miller, one of our students 
from Manheim, enjoyed a visit from her 
brother and wife, of the same place, Sun- 
day, October 8th. 

Mr. and Mrs. O. J Rothrock and son 
of Maitland, Mifflin Co., spent Saturday 
and Sunday, October 14 and 15, at Eliz- 
abethtown College. 

Miss Annie HoUinger was home, in 
Cumberland Co., a few days, recently. 
During her visit she attended the love- 
feast at her home church. 

Two active young ministers, Bro. J. F. 
Graybill, of Harrisburg, Pa., and Bro. C. 
R. Wolfe, of Clifton Mills, W. Va , are 
students at the College. 

Eld. Jesse Zeigler, the ever-welcome 
friend of the College, was in our midst 
Friday, October 13. His presence as well 
as bis words of encouragement was en- 
joye<i by all. 

Mr. Ralph Schlosser comes to the 
College once in three weeks, to recite 
work done on the English Scientific 
Course. He does this work in connection 
with teaching. 



A number of students and teachers of 
College, went chestnuting on Saturday to 
a hill about three miles distant. They 
enjoyed the trip and returned with some 
tired bodies and quite a lot of chestnuts. 

A new student arrived Wednesday 
evening, Oct. 11, namely, Mr. Domingo 
Dikit, a native of the Philippine Islands. 
We welcome him in our midst and hope 
that he may always feel at home among 
us. 

Mr. John Stayer, '05, of the Commercial 
Dept., who is now located in Altoona as 
an employe of the P. R. R. Company, 
paid a few days' visit to Elizabethtown 
College and friends in town a few weeks 
ago. 

The Departed Seasons. 

The warm April showers, followed by 
the bright sunshine, have long ere this 
time paid their tributes to the little daisy 
by the wayside. The violet by the river's 
brink is down trodden to rise no more. 
No more do we hear the song of the robin, 
nor do we see him flitting in and out 
among the cherry boughs, stopping only 
now and then to pluck the first ripe fruit. 
No more do we see him perch his red 
breast upon the farmer's garden fence 
watching to devour the first insect his 
eye doth see. And now too the black- 
bird's "chic-cher-ree" is hushed and still, 
and we see him swinging no more upon 
the drooping branches of the willow tree. 
But instead, as I sit beneath the monarch 
of the forest, I see his once green foliage 
blushing because of October's chilling 
wind and frost. I see traveling in the 
west the white-tinted storm cloud. Soon 
I am made to feel its keen blast. But my 
joy is so complete, I shrink not, nor fall, 
like the golden leaf from the bough above. 
Then my heart within me sank, when I 
saw autumn's blighting power. For I 
saw the herbage of the earth had turned 
pale. And 1 heard the lark in his glee, 
as he mounted into the air, chirping 
his valedictory to the departed seast)ns of 
Spring and Summer. B. F. Wampler. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES. 



Keystone Literary Society. 

The faculty value the training tliat a per- 
son receives by taking active part in our 
Fociety ahove thatilerived from the study 
f)f any branch of the school curricuUmi. 
The interest in this important branch 
of college work is growing not only 
among the faculty but also among the 
students. 

The following persons made application 
and were elected as avthe members of 
our society since the Fall^term opened, 
viz: Misses Leah Shaefier, Sarah Weaver. 
KmilieGran, EmmaGeorge, Stella Frantz, 
Anna Beahm, Mary Dnlel)olin, Kathryn 
Harley and Messrs. Dominio Dikit, Elmer 
Zietrler, Abram Weaver, Norman Musser, 
Andrew Knhn, Amos Hottenstein, J. F. 
Graybill, Bruce Rothruck, W. M. Glas- 
mire, Chas. Bower and Prof. Wampler. 

The principal features of our progran)S 
are Debates, Recitations, Declamations, 
Literary Echo, and Impromptu Addresses. 

The first three questions for debate 
were 1st, Sept. 8, 1905, Resolved, that the 
books we read exert a greater influence 
upon us than our associates. Discussed. 
Aff., J. G. Meyer, Miss Myer. Neg., 
Nathan Martin, P. S. Davis. 

2nd, Sept. 15, Resolved, that childhood 
is the hai)piest period of life. Discussed. 
Ati"., Miss Miller, D. C. Reber. Neg., 
Miss Ruth Stayer, C. M. Neff. 

3rd, Sept. 22, Resolved, that electricity 
is more beneH<;ial to mankind than steam. 
Discussed. Aff., Mr. Hottenstein, Mr. 
Oberholtzer. Neg., Mr. Keller, Mr. 
Martin. 

Among our new reciters are Misses 
Anna Beahm, Leah Sliaeffer and May 
Dulebohn. 

Eld. J. Kurtz Miller, of Brooklyn, gave 
a very much appreciated address at our 
executive session, Oct. 20, along the line 
of taking advantage of our opportunities, 
which are to a great extent at the expense 
of our parents. 

One of the most important features in 
the executive session of Oct. 6, was a 
speech from Prof. Ober on the subject, 



"What you do, do well." 

The "Literary Echo" by the editor, 
Miss Hartman, came up to the standard. 

At our last meeting, Oct. 20, we elected 
the following officers to serve the coming 
term, viz: Mr. Wm. Glasmire, Pres. ; 
.Mr. L. D. Rose, Vice Pres. ; Miss Dule- 
bohn, Sec ; Miss Shaefler, Editor; Prof. 
J. Z. Herr, Critic. J. G. M. 



Keynote to Success. 

Many people of today fail in life be- 
cause they lack confidence in themselves. 
"I Can and I Will!" Have you ever said 
these words to yourself with a firm con- 
viction that you were speaking the truth. 
If so, in that moment you knevv that un- 
told powers and possibilities were yours. 
You felt that you were in touch with all 
Strengh, Power, Knowledge, Happiness 
and Peace. You felt capable of executing 
any task con f routine you. 

But alas, the spirit of doubt, distrust, 
fear and unfaith, so often calls you back 
to the old path and the "I Can ami I 
Will" vision fades. Let us wake up and 
recognize this Something within. Let us 
begin to understand this "I Can and I 
Will" feeling. Let us cherish it if we 
have it, and cultivate it if we have it not. 
Do you know that we are young giants 
who have not discovered our own 
strength? Are you not aware that there 
are powers latent within us, pressing 
forth for development? Let us assert 
ourselves — take up the key, unlock the 
doors, and enter our kingdom. 

The world is looking for these "I Can 
and I Will" people. Pluck up courage 
ye doubters — ye "I Can't" people. Be- 
gin the tight by abolishing fear from your 
minds. Sound the keynote "I Can and 
I Will" with all your might and drown 
out the sounds of the "huts," "ifs," "sup- 
posings," "you-can'ts" and aren't-you- 
afraidg." Be it in the penmanship class, 
in the bookkeeping class, or any other 
class, remember that we climb the ladder 
step by step. Do not bother about the 



OUR COLIvEGE TIMES. 



•apper rounds of the ladder; you will 
reach them in time, but give your whole 
attention to the round just ahead of you, 
and when you have gained a firm footing 
on that, then look to the next one. 
Climb with desire, confidence and faith, 
inspiring each step, and the task will 
soon become a pleasure. Don't try to 
pull some other fellow off the ladder — 
there's room enough for both. Be kind. 
Sound the keynote constantly. Send 
forth a clear, glad, joyous note, a note of 
faith, a note of coming victory. Sound it 
over and over again until your whole 
being is quivering and vibrating to the 
keynote — "I Can and I Will." 

Jacob Z. Herr. 



Exchange Department. 

Order is said to be heaven's first law. 
All through nature we notice some uni- 
formity, some arrangement. Things do 
not happen: they are caused. These 
causes are not always easily understood, 
but the advice of Count de Gabalis is good 
when he says, "Learn of the philosophers 
always to look for natural causes in all 
extraordinary events; and when such 
natural causes are wanting, recur to God." 

That course in life, then, which puts us 
most nearly in touch with the great plan 
of Providence is the one which should 
engage our attention. To live the normal 
life, physically, intellectually and spirit- 
ually — the life based on the laws laid 
down by a kind Father for the welfare 
and happiness of His children — this is the 
great problem of life. 

Education, meaning of course true ed- 
ucation, is one of the means intended by 
God for the accomplishment of man's 
part of the great plan and purpose for 
which man was created — living up to, 
and helping others to live up to, the 
exalted state assigned to them. 

Where we find ourselves with reference 
to the goal in view matters but little; in 
fact, it is often beyond our control: but 
the direction in which we are traveling is 
far more important. In the divine econ- 



omy, backward movement is practically 
unrecognized. 

In this connection, we glean the follow- 
ing from an exchange, with some interest: 
"The very effort to grow in st'-ength, 
knowledge and virtue, springs from a 

divine impulse When, with 

conscious purpose, we strive to call forth 
and make living the latent powers of our 
being, we are working with God in the 
direction in which he impels the uni- 
verse." 

Much depends on the influences sur- 
rounding the young man or woman while 
at school. The same periodical quoted 
above sounds a note perfectly true when 
it says, "Teachers who have no moral 
standards, who are not devoted to God 
and the building of sound Christian char- 
acter, cannot educate, if education is a 
training for completeness of life, for com- 
plete life is found alone in God." 

Nathan Martin. 

PALMYRA. 

The children's meeting of the Brethren 
was held at Palmyra, Oct. 22. Brother 
A. L. B. Martin delivered a pleasing and 
appropriate address, on the "Good Shep- 
herd." Brother Beahm followed brother 
Martin It is always a question as to 
how far a speaker should adopt the 
simple, playful spirit of children. Some 
folks think a talk to children should be 
rather grave and dignified . Others again, 
drop right down among the children. 
The Palmyra S. S. is in a good working 
condition. Bro. G. W. Hoffer, with his 
co-workers, is doing a noble work. Bro. 
J. H. Longenecker is proving a most 
excellent shepherd of the Palmyra flock. 
October 22 was a day of deep interest in 
the Palmyra church. 



The Children's .Meeting at Mohrsville, 
Berks cornty, wa? one of intense interest. 
Jonathan Reber and E. W. Ernst are the 
superintendents. Brother Beahm ad- 
dressed the school. 



OUR COLIvEGE TIMES. 



The Youths of Our Day. 

The old adage \vhii:!i we all repeat ami 
pay that we believe, "The cliild is father 
of the man" surely is worthy of consider- 
ation It is more than an adage. It is a 
glimpse of truth which can never be 
changed. And yet as we see the average 
youth of our day we feel that in too many 
cases the youth is neglected with the ex- 
pectation that such neglect will not come 
to the surface when he becomes a man. 
Sad will be the disappointment when some 
parents will expect their sons and daugh- 
ters to blossom into strong and sturdy 
men and women, although they never 
have had the essential elements of char- 
acter developed in their less mature years; 
but say what we will, all such defects will 
eventually be brought forth in the pro- 
duct. And alas ! at a time when it 
is too late to change the product. 

As a nation we need to turn our 
attention more definitely and more 
devoutly to the rearing and forming of 
the men and women who shall help to 
make this nation in the immediate future. 
Any nation is always the sum total of its 
constituents, or in other words, any na- 
tion sums up to a standard of manhood 
and womanhood equal to that maintained 
in the home of its families. Our beloved 
country is no exception to this rule and 
it will only be what the sons and daugh- 
ters of to-day shall make it. 

H. K. 0. 



Dear Subscribers: — Your subscriptions 
to "Our College Times" have made this 
little paper possible, at least in part. 
Some subscriptions have expired, yet we 
would like to keep on sending the paper 
to those addresses. With the November 
num r quite a number of the subscrip- 
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ber kindly send us a renewal of your sub- 
scription. Thanking you all fur pa.st 
favors, we remain 

Sincerely yours, 

The Managing Editor. 



Elizabethtown Meeting. 

On Sunday afternoon, Oct. loth, Child- 
ren's Day Services were held in the 
Brethren's church in Elizabethtown. A 
large audience assembled to hear the ex- 
ercises. 

The speakers from a distance were Eld, 
Zeigler, Royersford, Pa., and Bro. George 
Henry, Derry Church, Pa., the Sunday 
School Secretary of the Eastern District of 
Pa. Their addresses were interesting and 
much appreciated. 

The school is in a flourishing condition, 
several of the classes being exceptionally 
large. 

The older pupils as well as the children 
deserve credit for their retrular attendance 
and the interest they manifest in the 
school. L. G. F. 



Children's Meeting at Shearer's. 

The Children's Meeting held at Shear- 
er's Meeting House was well attended. 
Elder S. R. Zug, H. S. Zug, Isaac Gibble 
and H. K. Ober addressed the meeting. 
Seven years ago the first S. S. was started 
here and has been kept up ever since. 
No one will ever know the influence for 
good that has gone out from this place. 
Brethren, keep on in the good work. 
"No cross, no crown." 



The Bible Department. 

We have a number of students at the 
College who are pursuing the Bible 
Course. Among whom may be men- 
tioned J. F. Graybill, of Harrisburg, 
Jacob Byer, of Lancaster, B. Mary Royer, 
of Richland, and in part, Kathryn Harley, 
of Myerstown, Pa. 



The name of Mr. Elmer Ruhl was ac- 
cidentally omitted from the list of under- 
graduates in the last issue. We beg his 
pardon. He is getting along nicely with 
his school work at Speedwell. Success, 
Elmer. 

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OUR COLIvEGE TIMES. 



Resolutions of Sympathy. 

On hearing of the death of Mr. Stephan, 
a staunch friend of the institution; a con- 
tributor to Memorial Hall; and father 
of one of our former students, Miss Ange- 
lina Stephan, we the undersigned com- 
mittee submit the following token of re- 
membrance. 

The following resolutions were adopted 
by faculty and students of Elizabethtown 
College : 

Whereas, it has pleased Divine Prov- 
idence to remove by death one of our 
patrons, Charles B. Stephan, and 

Whereas, by the death of the father 
the home circle has been broken and the 
hearts which were once gladdened by his 
presence, are now saddened and mournful, 
therefore Be it 

Resolved, That the faculty and students 
of Elizabethtown College deeply feel and 
regret the loss of this patron, and tender 
the bereaved family our sincere sympathy 
and condolence, be it 

Eesolved, That although we can feel in 
part only this great sorrow, yet we know- 
that God in his infinite wisdom knows 
best when to take back those blessings 
which in his mercy he lent us, and we 
humbly say, "Thy will be done." Be it 

Resolved, That a copy of these resolu- 
tions be sent to the family of our deceased 
patron and that they be published in 
"Our College Times," Elizabethtown 
Chronicle and Manheim Sentinel. 

J. G. Meyer, 

Sallie A. Miller, !- Committee. 

Elizabeth A. Zortman, 



Religion. 

Eiizal)Pthtown College is not a religious 
institution. It is an educational institu- 
tion; but no education is sufficiently broad 
unless it includes religious elements in 
character; if the religious faculty, the 
highest of the soul, is not supported, then 
the system is defective and narrowed. 

Religiously, Elizabethtown College is 
expected, from all thinking people, re- 
gardless of sect or creed, to be true to its 
constituents. It must be loyal to those 
people who ought to be the leading con- 
tributors. It ought in some way to es- 
pouse the cause of the people in whose 
interest it is especially working. Let it 
be understood though, clearly, fully, and 
distinctively, that while it is loyal to its 
immediate fraternity, yet no one on 
account of his religious convictions, shall 
in any way be embarrassed while making 
his sojourn with us; but that he shall 
always feel at liberty to hold his honest 
religious convictions, even though they 
may in some degree be at variance with 
others. 

Lenity is a gospel principle, and many 
people forget that law also is. Those who 
can make a proper combination of love 
and law, of mercy and justice, have at- 
tained a high efficiency in the Christian 
system. 

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OUR COLLEGE TIMES. 



EPHRATA. 

Kphrata is a cliartning, thriving town; 
three newspapers, good schools, churches 
and factories. 

The Brethren held their lovefeast there 
October 14. It was larjiely attended. 
Elder Peter K'Navel, Scalp Level, Pa., 
preached the sermon on self examination. 
Elder H. E. Li^rht, of Mountville, offi- 
ciated. 

Bro. Beahm preached on Sunday morn- 
ing, Oct. 15th, and addressed the Sunday 
School in the Children's Meetinjr in the 
afternoon. 

The Ephrata cliurch is in fine condi- 
tion, in both spirit and eflFort. The 
Sunday School is one of the most active 
and best organized in the district. Bro. 
George Weaver is superintendent. 

Their program was rich, well arranged, 
and well executed. Bro. .lerome Miller 
gave an excellent talk "What Children 
Are fiood For ;" Sister Heineman gave 
an impressive talk on missions; Sister 
Hildebrand's answer to "Why I Wear 
the Prayer Covering" was forcibly to the 
point. Sister Martin gave Scriptural 
readings again?t intemperance. Many 
others took active part. 



HOFFER'S. 



Oct. 8 was Children's Day at Hoffer's. 
The day was fine, the attendance large, 
and the occasion auspicious and inspiring 
in every way. 

Addresses were delivered by brethren 
H. K. Ober and J. W. Myer, both of 
which were well received. 

Brother J. B. Aldinger and his co- 
workers deserve credit for the work they 
have been doing. The time may not be 
far distant when they can have an ever- 
green Sunday School. 



CHIQUES. 

The Chiques Hill Children's Day 
services on Sept. 24, was one of the largest 
we ever attended. Brother P. C. Geib 
has had charge of the Sunday School at 
this historic place. He is a faithful 
worker, as are all his helpers. The chil- 
dren who took part in the services did 
their work beautifully. We should like 
to niention each one by name, but space 
forbids. 

Our Exchanges. 

We have now an exchange department 
edited by Nathan Martin. 

Tins department will subserve a good 
purpose in keeping in touch with our ed- 
itorial friends. 

Mr. Martin may enlarge the efficiency 
of this department in time to come, in 
accord with circuuistances. 

We have many valuable exchange 
papers on our list and are thankful to our 
generous friends. The columns of several 
important newspapers that are opened to 
College correspondence have the full ap- 
preciation of the College. 

Glad to Say. 

A number of students are in Elizabeth- 
town College primarily on account of the 
position taken against intercollegiate 
match games. 

Physical culture for beauty, health and 
usefulness — rather than for sport, brutal- 
ity, and beating. 

Every proper encouragement should be 
given to physical education. The body 
is the agent and servant of the soul. Let 
all look well to proper care and culture of 
their bodies. 

There are sound minds to endorse true 
education. But there should be more. 
Then we shall be glad, indeed. 



Elder Jesse Ziegler visited the College 
Oct 13, and gave an address to the faculty 
and students in chapel assembled. 



Miss Elizabeth Zortman, class of 1905, 
Teachers' Course, spent the summer and 
early autumn in considerable travel, and 
returns to the College with full cheeks 
and robust appearance, for some special 
effort in post-gradnate work. 



D. H. 7V^ 7:^ R T I N 

Clothing and Gents' Furnishings 

Centre Square, Elizabethtown, Pa. 



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Elizabethtown, Pa. 



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0nx College Cime0. 



Wisdom is the Principal Tiling.'^ 



Vol. II. 



Elizabethtown, Pa., January, i9o6. 



No. 5. 



The Aim of Elizabethtown College. 

BY D. C. EKBER. 

When an ocean steamer leaves port, the 
observer naturally asks "Whither bound ? 
Where is the destination?" When a 
young man or woman leaves home for 
college, the question by friends and 
neighbors is "^wo vadis? i.e. Whither 
are you going?" meaning by that to 
inquire "What is going to become of 
you?" or better "What are you going to 
make out of yourself?" When a college 
is founded, an aim is expected to exist, 
and by the uninformed the inquiry is 
made "Why these massive buildings? 
Why all this sacrifice?" 

It is known full well that the answers 
to these last questions are not the same. 
Many there are who misunderstand the 
real motives that give rise to colleges. 
And like all man-made inslitutions, some 
colleges have not always proved an un- 
mixed blessing. 

Our educational system, strange to say, 
has developed from the top down. Five 
centuries before the ('hristian era, we read 
of university life among the Athenians. 
Although we read in the Bible of a college 
at Jerusalem over six hundred years 
before Christ, yet our modern college 
dates from the middle of the thirteenth 
century. The preparatory school orig- 
inated in the sixteenth century. And 
universal education in the form of free 
public schools, became a fact in the nine- 
teenth century. 



A college is a society of scholars which 
is chartered by the State, with certain 
rights and privileges. In the United 
States there are more than four hundred 
and fifty colleges and universities, and 
of these, Elizabethtown College is prob- 
ably the youngest. Many of these owe 
their origin to the State, others to private 
benefactions, and about one-half are 
denominational colleges. Our college falls 
in the last class; but in common with the 
majority of such institutions it is not 
sectarian, and her doors are open to all 
persons irrespective of color, creed, or 
sex, 

Elizabethtown College may be said to 
have a general aim and a specific or 
distinctive aim. In common with other 
colleges, she aims at the perfection of the 
individual both physical and mental. 
She aims to prepare the individual to 
live completely and to render the highest 
service to humanity. 

But specifically our college stands as 
the exponent of true education, that is, 
an education obtained under Christian 
influences and implanting correct ideals 
of life. 

In the midst of forty-four colleges and 
one hundred and thirty-four private insti- 
tutions of learning in Pennsylvania, why 
add another to this long list? Were edu- 
cational facilities not ample? To justify 
the establishment of a college at Eliz- 
abethtown, it may be said that many 
denominational colleges have many of the 
objectionable features that non-denomi- 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES. 



national colleges possess. These are 
chiefly three, viz : excessive emphasis 
and attention to intercollegiate athletics, 
direct or indirect fostering of incorrect 
and false notions of the aims of education 
and of life, and negligence in shielding 
the students from immoral and unchris- 
tian influences attendant upon student 
life. 

Again the small college has a mission 
which the university cannot perform. 
And the denominational college has a 
distinct purpose in providing advantages 
for Christian education under the auspices 
of a particular church. 

Dr. W. T. Harris, commissioner of 
education in the United States, summar- 
izes the argument for Christian education 
thus: "The best intellectual, volitional, 
and ethical results are better secured in 
the denominational college than in one 
under State control. The private college 
is usually organized on the religions foun- 
dation; its trustees are chosen with greater 
or less regard to religious affiliations; its 
teachers, though not selected on denom- 
inational grounds, are yet by presumption 
sympathetic with essential Christianity. 
The routine of each day begins with a 
chapel service." 

What motives should a college appeal 
to in inspiring the student body to secure 
an education ? There are those who wish 
to know that they may know; this is 
curiosity and is an instinctive emotion. 
There are those who wish to know that 
they may be known; this is vanity and 
a wrong motive. Again there are those 
who wish to know to sell their knowledge; 
this is covetousness and is a low, selfish 
and one-sided motive. It is the utilitar- 
ian aim of education. 

On the other hand, there are those who 
wish to know that they may edify; this 
is charity and a lofty motive. It leads to 
service for humanity. Lastly there are 
those who wish to know that they may 
be edified. This accords with the first 
class and includes it. Here the motive 
is heavenly prudence. The last two are 



the hiehest motives that can actuate any 
one and which this college should ever 
hold before herself. 

Some one has stated the true end of 
education to be to see and to know God 
now, and to glorify Him hereafter. True 
education ought to rid the mind of false and 
distorted views of life. It ought to point 
to the manliness of Jesus of Nazareth as 
the correct ideal of manhood. Primarily 
the college aims at thorough scholarship, 
that is, knowledge. But with the knowl- 
edge, the right use of knowledge, namely, 
wisdom, should also be imparted. Wis- 
dom is the highest form of knowledge. 

Another essential element in true edu- 
cation is ability to do. This is the test 
of one's education, viz: "What can you 
do?" This means training in certain 
arts and especially the art of conduct. 
It includes the formation of correct habits 
which constitute character. Education 
must be serviceable and must make its 
possessor useful, good for something. 

The last essential of true education is a 
completely fashioned will — a Christian 
character. This we call righteousness. 
Hence we see that true education aims to 
fit for life both here and hereafter. The 
perfection aimed at is threefold: perfect 
knowledge or heavenly wisdom, the 
beginning of which is thefear of the Lord; 
perfect conduct which is service to man 
and to God; perfect character, being a 
child of God seeking first the kingdom 
of God and His ri<jrhteousness. 

Elizabethtown College then means 
opportiuritij to young men and women 
whose life is still before them, whose 
highest duty is to fit themselves for life 
and life's work. It is hoped that it will 
mean intellectual emancipation. Christian 
education, and a deep consecration of life 
to God's cause. 

The practical test of the college's aim 
remains to be made. Is the foregoing a 
correct portrayal of her aim or ideal ? If 
so, how nearly is it realized in her grad- 
uates who go out as the finished and final 
product of her efforts ? May her students 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES. 



when they leave prove to the educational 
and to the religious world that the college 
at Elizabethtown fulfils a distinct missinn 
fee that the fondest hopes cherished by 
her founders may be truly realized ! 



Resolutions of Respect. 

At the regular Chapel exercises of Eliz- 
abethtown College, Nov. 16, the follow- 
ing preamble and resolutions were 
adopted : 

Whereas, the hand of Divine Provi- 
dence has removed our esteemed friend 
and patron, Martin Wolgemuth, from the 
scene of his temporal labors. 

Whereas, it is just that we give fitting 
recognition of his many virtues: there- 
fore, be it 

Resolved, That we tenderly condole 
with the family of our deceased patron 
in their hour of trial and affliction, and 
devoutly commend them to the keeping 
of Him who looks with pitying eye upon 
the widowed and ttie fatherless 

Resolved. That while we deeply sympa- 
thize with those who were bound to our 
departed patron by the nearest and dearest 
ties, we share with them the hope of 
reunion in that better world where there 
are no partings, and bliss ineffable forbids 
a tear. 

Resolved, That a copy of these resolu- 
tions be sent to the family of our deceased 
patron and that they be published in the 
College Times, Elizaheihtown Chronicle, 
and Mt. Joy Herald. 

LUELLA G. FOGELSANGER, 

P. y. Davis, !- Committee. 

Nellie Hartman, 



Some regard the happy, cheerful, jovial 
life as insincere. The "sad countenance" 
of the Pharisee is obviously insincere. 
How much censure shall we give the 
person who suppresses 50 per cent, or 75 
percent, of his humor, but is still quite 
radiant with good cheer? Wise answers 
wanted. 



Society Notes. 

The Keystone Literary Society held its 
last meeting on Dec. 15. H. L. Smith 
presided. The terra officers for the 
Winter Term were elected. Chorister, 
Mrs. Wampler; Treasurer, Prof. Davis; 
Librarian, Mr. Byer. 

Misses Stella Hotfer, Annie Crouse, 
Fannie Zug, and Messrs. C. W. Gibbel, 
Abram Bomberger, I. M. Neff, I. E. B. 
Kline, Isaac Singer, Aaron Shank, Peter 
Eshleman, P. B. Gibble, D. H. Marks. 
Oscar Diehm, Christ Holsinger and Clay- 
ton Fry were elected active members of 
the Society. 

The Society is doing a good work. A 
student certainly cannot afford to miss 
the benefits derived from it by not join- 
ing on account of being full of other work. 

A student gets a training by taking 
part in such a Society that he or she 
could not get in the classroom. 

A very interesting feature on our pro- 
grams in the past term was "Parliament- 
ary Drill." This gives the members a 
knowledge of Parliamentary Law, which 
every young man and lady should 
have when entering upon actual life. 

The del)ates are very interesting and 
certainly of great value to students. Per- 
haps the greatest value derived from 
these debates is that they cause students 
to see and look at things from many more 
different angles. 

Among the questions debated were the 
followiiit;: Resolved, "That the manufac- 
turer is a greater benefactor than the 
farmer." 

ResoiRed, "That there is more pleasure 
in anticipation than in realization." 

Resolved, "That a man who has no 
children should pay school tax." 

Resolved, "That selfishness is the main- 
spring of human action." 

Resolved, "That the influences of the 
home are greater factors in building 
character than the influences of the 
school." J. G. M. 



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OUR COLLEGE TIMES. 



€>ur College Ctmeg. 

EDITORIAL STAFF. 

EUITOK IN chief: 

1. N. H. BEAHM. 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS : 

D. C. REBER. NATHAN MARTIN 

ELIZABETH MEYER 

SPECIAL EDITORS : 

Local Editor, - - - RUTH STAYER 

Society Editor, - - JACOB G. MEYER 

BUSINESS MANAGEMENT : 

Managing Editor and Business Manager, 

H. K. OBER 

ASSOCIATES : 

J. Z. HERR, E. ROY ENGLE 



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Bible Term ! 
Happy New Year ! 
Large grammar classes. 
We need a field editor. 
Music interest is growing. 
Do not miss the Bible Term. 
Winter Term enrollment, 90. 
Bro. Ober for S. S. Economy. 
Live classes and thorough work. 
Be ready for a good Bible Terra. 
The new teachers are doing well. 
The Bible Department is growing. 

Board of Trustees held a meeting Dec. 
19th. 

There is fine feeling among ourStndent 
body. 

Eld. T. T. Myers' address was of a high 
order. 

School reopens Jan. 1, with the 1 o'clock 
classes. 

Get ready for Eld. S. H Hertzler on 
St. James. 

Jan. Special Bible Work opens Jan. 8. 
Lasts two weeks. 



The old chapel will become a music 
ball. 

Fiear Eld. J. Kurtz Miller through St. 
Luke during Bible Term ! 

Our students attend the college relig- 
ious services most encouragingly. 

Bro. Reber will teach a cla-ss daily 
during Bible Term in Hoiniietics. 

Now is the time for resolutions — such 
as are proper and to be carried out. 

Prof. Wampler for singing. He will 
have something good for Bible Termers. 

The new Library and Day Students' 
Hall will be a handsome convenience. 

The Glasmire administration of the 
Keystone Literary Society was firm, 
rigorous and prosperous. 

Winter Term enrollment has reached 
90. This is the largest term enrollment 
in the history of the College. 

Prof. Ober, our managing editor, is in 
full charge of Our College Times on the 
financial side. He is pushing the work. 
He smiles graciously on every new sub- 
scriber. Keep him smilin«. Send him 
subscriptions ! 



The New Chapel. 

This handsome room located on second 
floor of Memorial Hall is being called 
handsome. It will be used during Bible 
Term. However, it will not be wholly 
finished. The date of the dedication is 
not set yet. But we are glad to use a 
part of Memorial Hall so soon. The room 
is much needed. The work has progressed 
well of late. The new chapel is to be 
one of the best additions to our excellent 
equipments. We should always remem- 
ber the liberal hearts that have made the 
new building a possibility. Come to 
Bible Term and enjoy the work, and with 
a view to better service and praise. 



Subscribe for Our College Times. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES. 



Locals. 

Miss Nellie Hartnian received a visit 
from her mpther and sister, Nov. 13th. 

Miss Effie Shank, a former student and 
teacher in Danphin Co., attended the 
-Anniversary Exercises Monday evening, 
Nov. 13th. 

Mr. C. M. Neff, a student of the Com- 
mercial Dept., has been recently em- 
ployed by A. Buch's Sons, in Elizabeth- 
town. 

Miss Amelia Graflf^'of Brooklyn, N. Y., 
spent Saturday and Sunday, Nov. 11th 
and 12th in the country visiting her 
friend. Miss Maggie Shelley. 

Elder Zug was with us Monday morn- 
ing, Nov. 13th, and gave a short but 
helpful address to the students. We 
extend a hearty welcome to Bro. Zug to 
return again. 

Mr. Elmer Ruhl, a student of last year, 
is teaching near Speedwell, Pa. Accom- 
panied by his sister, he spent Saturday 
and Sunday, Nov. 26th and 27th, visiting 
friends at the College. 

Prof, and Mrs. Wampler spent Thanks- 
givintr in Berks Co., as the guests of Mr. 
W. E. Glasmire. Before they returned 
home they also visited in Myerstown at 
the home of Prof. Herr, and Miss Weaver. 

Mr. and Mrs R R Stayer, of Wood- 
bury, Pa., spent from Oct. 26th to Nov. 
2nd in our vicinity as the guests ot their 
daughters, Mrs Frank W. Groflf, '04, and 
Miss Ruth Stayer. 

Many friends visited at the College 
during the the week beginning Oct. 29th. 
Those who conducted the chapel exer- 
cises during the week were as follows : 
Tuesday morning, Eld. Beelman, of 
Cumberland county; Wednesday morn- 
ing, Eld. H. M. Stover, of Waynesboro, 
a brother of Wilbur Stover, who is now 
in India as a missionary; Thursday morn- 
ing, Prof. Keller, a former teacher in the 
College; and Friday morning, Eld. Cassel, 
of Lansdale, Pa. 



Mr. J. H. Stayer, '05, and sister, Miss 
Eliza Stayer, of Woodbury, Pa., who was 
also a former student, arrived at Eliz- 
abethtown, Nov. 11th. They attended 
the Anniversary Exercises on Monday 
night, Nov. 13th. 

We regret to make note that Miss 
Kathryn Harley, of Myerstown, was 
called home on account of some business 
transactions We miss your presence. 
Miss Harley, and hope you will soon 
return. R. S. 



Worth Studying. 

"Teach me to feel another's woe, 

To hide the fault I see; 
That mercy I to others show, 

That mercy show to me."— Pope. 

Ail friends of the college and of the 
teachers are very gentle and prudent in 
adverse criticism. 

Enemies attack weak points; friends, 
remedy or defend them. Friends are 
easily recognized. The friendship of all 
is solicited. 



New students are doing well. 

Note the preachers for Bible Term. 

Good feeling among our teachers. 

Folding chairs are ordered for new 
Chapel. 

Nice iron bedsteads are coming for new 
dormitories. 

More Bible knowledge is needed. More 
Bible living will be good. 

We are making special arrangements 
to lodge and board Bible termers. 

The present commercial hall will be 
used later as a special dining hall. 

The spirit of fellowship and obedi- 
ence among our students is much appre- 
ciated. 

"Sunny Side" Table donated a nice new 
butter knife to the college — with name of 
table engraved. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES. 



Advantages of an Alumni Association. 

In wliat respec^t the Aluiimi Association 
may be of athantajre to its nieinhers is 
a question t'nat we innst meet. Is there 
any way in which we may show to others 
tliat there are a<K'antages connected with 
the Association ? Surely. When oryran- 
ized with the right purpose in view, 
advantages may result therefrom that can 
come to ns in no other way. 

First, let us dwell upon the reminis- 
cences of i)ast school days, and of the 
associations with our fellow school-mates, 
bringing back to mind the sorrows and 
pleasures which we shared, also our fail- 
ures and triumphs. We may be made to 
think of where we have erred, and should 
tlius be spurred on to greater endeavor to 
do the right than ever before. Others 
perhaps have made greater progress than 
we, and by thus coming in contact with 
them through the Association, we may 
receive inspiration that shall better qual- 
ify us for life's mission. 

Schools or colleges of a higii moral 
nature are likely to lead the minds of the 
students to higher ideals of manhood and 
womanhood, and when one thus leaves 
the institution and goes out into the world 
to mingle with all classes of people, it 
certainly is a great advantage in coming 
in contact with those whose minds and 
hearts had felt the same influences we 
have had. 

If the element of raising each other to 
a higher plane of civilization is kept pre- 
dominant and the spiritual idea is not 
lost sight of in the purely social and hila- 
rious, all other matters will take care of 
themselves. Our social wants will not be 
neglected, and our literary instincts will 
find scope and play. 

When one is associated with the organ- 
ization, what an advantage it is to learn 
of the progress made by our fellow-stu- 
dents, see wherein we have been lacking, 
and strive to rectify our failures by doing 
more nobly in the future. If one would 
isolate himself from the other school- 
mates after leaving the institution he 



would be deprived of many advantages 
which he would otherwise enjoy. 

Unity naturally results in strength, and 
this is no exception to the rule. There is 
inspiration gotten from collective bodies 
or organizations, be it a meeting of stu- 
dents, teachers, doctors, lawyers, Chris- 
tian workers, or in united endeavor of 
any kind. What would the teacher's 
profession be without monthly meetings 
and annual institutes? The inspiration 
that a teacher receives from a collective 
body of teachers all united for the same 
end and having the same purpose in view 
cannot be too highly estimated, and so in 
all organized effort. Paul knew of the 
inspiration and help that is gotten through 
meeting together when ne said in Heb. 
10:25, "Not forsaking the assembling of 
ourselves together, as the manner of some 
is, but exhorting one another." At these 
meetings speeches may be made and 
plans discussed for the further advance- 
ment of the interests of the S( hool. 

It is gratifying to the management of a 
school to have the manifestations of 
sympathy and approval on the part of the 
Alumni and old students, and if it were 
not for the strong, unwavering support on 
the part of those who had attended and 
afterwards engaged in various occupations 
elsewhere, the number of students at 
many schools and colleges would be far 
below the present standard. The growth 
and success of all educational institutions 
depends largely upon its graduates, and 
through organizing an Alumni Associa- 
tion, love and interest for our Alma Mater 
may be cherished and fostered, and at 
each yearly meeting we receive so much 
new inspiration, and experience such 
great enjoyment in meeting with our fel- 
low graduates that we may more likely 
eni ourage others to become students, and 
thus also have them reap the benefits 
and pleasures of student life. 

At the meetings of the Alumni Associ- 
ation, what thoughts of the past come 
crowding upon us ! We greet with affec- 
tionate remembrance those who pointed 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES. 



out to us the paths of knowledge, we 
bring our testimony to the value of the 
culture here imparted, we speak our vows 
of homage before these holy altars, and 
place our gifts of gratitude upon our 
Alma Mater's shrine. 

It is said by scientists, that thought, like 
matter, is indestructible; that, once origi- 
nated, it may be dormant in the brain 
for years; but there it remains, if not cor- 
related in some other form of energy, 
until called into action by some chance 
remark or particular occasion. So to the 
Alumni members, who are in the midst 
of an active life it is a great advantage to 
attend these meetings, reviving the 
memories of early days and bringing 
back to thought the familiar scenes of 
school life. Then it is that the heart 
beats faster, if we think of time well 
spent; then it is that tears rush forth, if 
memory tells us of opportunities neg- 
lected, of words hastily spoken, of wrongs 
intentionally done. It fills us with aspi- 
rations for the high dignity of perfect 
manhood and womanhood, that we seek 
to attain such beauty and symmetry of 
character as will lift us into a higher 
sphere, bring us nearer to the ideal of the 
Divine mind, and give to our eternity its 
highest beauty and crowning glory. 

Bessie Rider. 

This was read at the Alumni Meeting lield on 
Tuesday evening, June 13, 1905. 



Brother Beahm is very thankful for the 
favor conferred on him by the Elizabeth- 
town church in formally excusing him 
from the routine appointments so that he 
may be from home more and thus to be 
able to look more after the internists ot 
the college. This also gives belter oppor- 
tunity to those who may be at home. 
But it is a great sacrifice to be from home 
so much. Still our Brother is willing to 
be on the altar when it brings a two-fold 
blessing. He hopes however to be at 
home more. 



I have always noticed that success 
Is mixed with trouble more or less, 

And he who does his best, 
He gets more kicks than all the rest. 

—Riley. 

A Magazine Critic ? 

Some one suggests that it might be well 
to have a general critic who shall analyze 
in the most thorough manner all pro- 
ductions that appear in the various col- 
lege periodicals. 

We most heartily endorse what is said 
by the exchange editor of the "College 
Campus" in the December issue, with re- 
gard to "a self-appointed critic for college 
magazines." 

If it be feasible to have a properly ap- 
pointed general critic for college mag- 
azines, and further, if it be in order, we 
do and it is hereby moved that the ex- 
change editor of the "Philomathean 
Monthly," one of the best college papers 
extant, be made general college magazine 
critic. He surely has attributes in com- 
mon with the distinguished literary critic, 
the immortal Alexander Pope, W. W. T. 



The New Heating Plant. 

The new heating plant installed by 
W. Parke Cummings, of Lancaster, hag 
been operated for some time with refer- 
ence to the original College building. 
On Dec. 9th it was operative in Memorial 
Hall for the first. It is hoped that this 
new and capacious plant will render 
efficient service. 

C. S. Livengood and W. H. Thomas are 
operating the plant. As soon as the 
present arrangements are terminated, 
or as early as practicable, it is proposed to 
have one specially employed to supply the 
heat. It is thought by skilled labor at 
this point fuel may be saved, but Mr. 
Livengood and Mr. Thomas are them- 
selves becoming skillful and eflRcient in 
their post of duty. They are reliable and 
active and we shall hope for good results. 

Subscribe for Our College Times. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES. 



Program Sixth Annual Bible Term. 

Two weeks, opening Jan. 7, witli 
sermon, closing Jan. 21, with eernion. 
A fine opportunity for Bible study. 

DAILY PROGRAM. 

Forenoon — 8:15, Homiietics, D. C. 
Reber. 9:00, Chapel Exercises, Devo- 
tional. 9:20, Sunday School Economy, 
H. K. Ober. 10:00, St. James' Epistle, 
S. H. Hertzler. 10:40, St Luke's Gospel, 
J. Kurtz Miller. 

Afternoon— 1:40, Doctrine, I N. H. 
Beahm. 2:20, Vocal Music, B. F. VVamp- 
ler, 3:00, St. Luke's Gospel, J. Kurtz 
Miller. 

Note — It is expected this program will 
be followed definitely. 

Expenses — Tuition is free. Board and 
lodging, $3.00 per week. Single meals, 
20 cents. Lodging per single night, 15 
cents. 

PREACinXG PROGRAM. 

Sunday, January 7, 7:00 p. m., The 
Church, J. H. Witmer. 

Monday, January 8, 7:00 p. m., Man's 
First State, William B. Zimmerman. 

Tuesday, January 9, 7:00 p. m., Love, 
J. H. Richard. 

Wednesday, January 10, 7:00 p. m.> 
Confidence, A. L. B. Martin. 

Thursday, Jan. 11, 7:00 p. m., Prayer, 
David K. Kilhefner. 

Friday, January 12, 7:00 p. m.. 
Evangelistic Services begin, J. Kurtz 
Miller. 

Brother Millei will continue his evan- 
gelistic preaching until the close of the 
Bible Term, Sunday, Jan. 21, 7:00 P. M. 

SPECIAL PROGRAMS. 

1. Educational Meeting, Saturday, 
Jan. 13, 1:30 p. m. 

2. Sunday School Session, Saturday, 
Jan. 20, 1:30 p. m. 

3. Missionary Session, Sunday, Jan, 
21, 2:00 p. m. 

For these programs, topics and speak- 
ers will be arranged after the term opens. 
These occasions should be of rare merit 
and inspiration. 



Anniversary. 

Nov. 13th was a red-letter day in the 
history of our Colletfe, it being the fifth 
Anniversary of the founding of the school. 
All the representatives were on hand early 
and the difl^erent features on the pro- 
gramme were excellently rendered. 

The address of welcome was niade by 
Pres. Beahm. Mr. I. E Shoop, '04, gave 
an oration on Our Nation's Needs. Dr. 
Reber then spoke to us on The Aim of the 
College. Our readers can judge for them- 
selves the merits of this address, which 
is published in full in this issue of Our 
College Times. 

Miss Nellie Hartman recited in an 
admirable manner, the selection entitled 
"On the Other Train." The main feature 
of the evening was an address by Eld. 
T. T. Myers, of Philadelphia. 

This address needs no comment, more 
than that it very forcibly showed the 
scholarship, culture, and excellent talent 
of the one who gave it He urged the 
necessity of first getting a good, full, 
broad, all-round education, and of after- 
wards specializing along a certain line of 
work. 

The five special pieces of music, con- 
sisting of choruses, anthems, etc., pre- 
pared and rendered under the skillful 
direction of Prof. Wampler, our Musical 
Director, added largely to the interests of 
the evening Elizabeth Myer. 



There are good classes in Algebra. 

The Commercial class is jostling with 
life. 

We have two interesting Geometry 
classes. 

Eld. Jesse Ziegler officiated at Chapel 
services Dec. 20. He also gave a pithy 
address. Couie again, brother. 

Any bad feeling that is allowed to 
linger is hard on character. "Let not the 
sun go down on your wrath." The man 
who gets angry and stays angry is in a 
bad way. "Be angry and sin not." 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES. 



Exchange Department. 

— While we always prefer to contem- 
plate the signs of the times which point 
toward blessing and prosperity, we 
cannot close our eyes to a few serious and 
sorry conditions obtaining among the 
masses all over this heaven-favored 
country of ours. Among these may be 
mentioned the remarkable ignorance of 
the literature and teaching of the Bible on 
the part of our so-called enlightened 
Christian nation. In other countries con- 
ditions are largely the same; the evil, 
however, seemingly increasing as civiliza- 
tion lowers. An excellent article from 
the Youth's Companion comes to us via 
The California Student We quote a few 
apt fragments : 

"It is a distinct and serious loss to the 
intellectual capital of our time that so few 
men and women are faaiiiiar with the 
phraseology of the Bible. To say nothing 
of the ethical and spiritual misfortune, 
the decline in ability to appreciate or to 
use Biblical allusions makes literature 
poorer and less (classic. .... 

"A class of eighteen-year-old girls in a 
large Boston school had never heard of 
Lot's wife. .... A class 
of boys and girls made no distinction be- 
tween St. John the apostle and John the 
Baptist A large elec- 
tive class in Harvard University, in a 
recent recitation, had not one stu- 
dent who could explain an allusion 
to Calvary 

"The loss of the wealth of allusion con- 
tained in the Bible is a calamity far worse 
than would be the loss of the Greek or 
Roman classics. It is like the closing of 
a great, beautiful region, open for centur- 
ies for the delight of humanity, and 
abandoned because of sheer indifference 
to its beauties. .... 

"It (The British and Foreign Bible 
Society) has circulated one hundred mil- 
lions of copies of the Bible, or parts of 
the Bible. It has secured translations of 
the Bible into nearly four hundred lang- 
uages. Over against these achitwements, 



it reported that there are still in the world 
four hundred and fifty millions of people 
who never yet had the chance to read the 
Bible in the only language that they can 
understand." 

With our co-worker of the western 
coast, we deeply deplore such conditions. 
Yet we feel to rejoice in the signs of a 
revival along this line in the intellectual 
world. The intense desire for more of 
the true and wonderful philosophy of the 
Book and the earnest study of the teach- 
ing methods of the great Teacher that 
characterizes the work of recent years are 
a good omen. 

— There is no place where we have a 
greater opportunity to scatter sunshine 
than in our college life. All about us are 
those who sometimes get discouraged and 
are almost ready to cease striving, while 
a helping word or smile is all they need 
to give them renewed strength and hope. 

It is not the man or woman who is the 
greatest student that does the most good 
in the world. Knowledge is practically 
useless if we have no power to give to 
others from our bountiful store. A man 
or woman may have the wisdom of 
Solomon, and yet be one of the most un- 
happy persons we meet. — Philomathean 
Monthly. 

— It has been said that a person is not 

educated until he has a trained mind, a 

consecrated heart, and a helping hand. 

— Botetourt Normal Quarterly. 

• 
—Good books are the best of friends, 

the same yesterday, today and forever. 

— College Rays. 

— Education and the Christian religion 
are the forces that must, eventually, be 
depended upon to fraternize the nations 
of the earth. — Juniata Echo. 

— Above all build character while in 
school. To be trained intellectually, 
without righteousness and purity of life, 
is simply to be a shrewd animal. — The 
Standard. Nathan Martin. 



i'-t- 



'^ROV'-i 



ISaiTO 




los. H. Ridei & Son 

seU 

Builders' Hardware 



Stoves, Ranges, Heaters, Washing Machines, 

Wringers, &c. 

We'll Try to Please You. 



An Appreciated Letter. 

This excellent message from our dear 
brother, D. L. Miller came to hand Dec. 2: 

Sydney, Austrama, Oct. 30, 1905. 
My Dearly Beloved Brother Beahm: — 

My inclination is to write a lono; letter; 
but Time, the arbiter of all changes says 
"No" ! and so a card must take to you 
our love and expression of esteem for you 
and our prayers and best wishes for you 
in all your work for the master. 

Strange isn't it that we are having 
spring time here while you are having the 
coming frosts of winter? The days too 
are growing longer contrary to all well 
regulated rules .of the lengthening and 
shortening of the days. But we are 
thirty-eisiht degrees south of the equator, 
and things are difierent here. The Lord 
is so good to us, blessed us with good 
health, joyous spirits and happy hearts. 
Blessed be His name ! 

May the dear Father give you richly 
of the peace that passeth all understand- 
ing. Love to you all. D. L. Miller. 



I B. G. CROFF & SON | 

I CONTRACTORS AND 

i BUILDERS 



Coal, Grain, Feed, 
Lumber and Stone 



ELIZA8ETHT0WN, PA. ♦ 

t 



♦ -♦--♦-•^ 



♦--♦-♦♦- 



Dr. Reber's article in this issue was one 
of the treats at the Anniversary, Nov. 13. 
Read it carefully. 



JOS. D. HOLLINGER 

Home-made Tinware 
Spouting, &c. 



STOVES, HEATERS AND FURNACES 

Roofing and Tin Roof Painting a Spf.cialty. 
Coal Oil and Ga.soline. 



D. H. 7V\ A R T I N 

Clothing and Gents' Furnishings 

Centre Square, Elizabethtown, Pa. 



A. W. Martin 

COAL, WOOD, GRAIN 
FLOUR AND FEED 

Telephone. 

Elizabethtown, Penna. 



GEO. D. BOGGS & SON 



DEALERS IN 



STOVES, RANGES, 
HOUSEFURNISHING GOODS, 

AND A FULL LINE OF 

HARDW^ARE 

Call to see us, we will supply your wants. 
S. Market St., Elizabethtown, Pa. 



H* S* Hottenstein 

CABINET-MAKER 

AND UNDERTAKER 

A full line of FURNITURE always 
on hand. Call to see me. My lines will 
please you. Undertaking carefully at- 
tended to. 

Elizabethtown, Pa. 



J. RALPH GRDSB 

SHAVING AND HAIRCUT7INQ 

PARLOR 

Hair Singeing a Specialty 

S. Market St. ELIZABETHTOWN. 



Hornafius' Cafe 

ICE CREAM, 

SODA WATER 

Fine Line of Confections always on hand. 

Meals at All Hours* 
The Enlarged 

BOOK STORE 

Means Better Service. 

CALL TO SEE ME. 

G. N. Falkenstein 

Books, Stationery and School Supplies 

Elizabethto^wn, Pa. 
Geise Sc McBride 

















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Page Wire Fence a Specialty 
FARM IMPLEMENTS 

AGENTS FOR 

New Holland Gasoline Engines, Universal 
Plows, Grain Drills, Owego Wagons, Etc. 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 

HARRY MILLER 
Cabinet Maker and Undertaker 

A FULL LINE OF FURNITURE 
S. Market St., Elizabethtown, Pa. 



THe EAGLe LAW!N SWING 

Built to Accommodate Four Passengers. Write For Booklet and Prices 

M a II u I a 1-- 
tnrt'({ entirely 
of steel, with 
the exception 
of the slats in 
seats and plat- 
form. 




M.-mufaotured bv A. BUCH'S SONS CO 



The most 
l)eaiitifiil de- 
sign and pleas- 
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troduced. 
''' Sold entirely 

on its merits. 
E 1 izabethto w n , Pa. 




WEAVER ?,T.^gi 

EASY TO OPERATE 
MARD TO WEAR OUT 

Write For Catalogue and Prices to the 

WEAVEH QHGA/N gc PIA/NQ C OMPA /NCJ. 
ALL THE NEWS IN THE 

Elizabethto>vn Chronicle 

ONLY THE BEST JOB PRINTING 
.1 N ni WFIi FR GOOD VALUES, EXCELLENT WORKMANSHIP, HONEST PRICES. 

U. 11. ULTTLILLII This represents mir ('L()TllIX(i ami SHOKS, 

as well as all other lines. 

AGENT FDR LEBANON STEAM LAUNDRY 

J. N. OLWEILER, ^'e^^TI^'PR^a^NsD^^^ ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



0nx College Cime0. 



" Wisdoin is the Principal Thiny.'^ 



Vol. II. 



Elizabethtown, Pa., March, 1906. 



No. 6. 



Spring Term Announcement. 

The spring terra of Elizabethtown 
College opens on March 19, to continue 
thirteen weeks. As the class work is 
entirely reorganized at the opening of 
this term, special advantages are offered 
to prospective teachers as well as to those 
coming from the public schools, who wish 
to review their studies and take up ad- 
vanced work. 

FACULTY. 

During the year the faculty of nine 
capable and experienced teachers was 
strengthened by the addition of several 
instructors. Every department of work 
is well equipped and offers increased 
advantages during this term. 

DEPARTMENTS. 

Pedagogical. — This department is regu- 
larly maintained and offers a three years' 
course. During this term. President 
Beahm will conduct a class in the ele- 
ments of Pedagogy for the beneffl of 
those who expect to be examined by the 
County Superintendent. For those 
teachers who wish to pursue advanced 
work in pedagogy, classes in Genetic 
Psychology, Systems of Education, Phil- 
osophy of Teaching, Methodology, and 
Ethics will be organized. 

English Scientific — Classes in all the 
common school studies will be formed 
suitable to the needs of those coming 
from the public schools. Besides, clas.^es 
in Civics, Algebra, American Literature, 
English Literature, Phvsical Geography, 
Higher Arithmetic, Botany, Chemistry, 



Drawing, General History, Geometry are 
regularly formed. 

College Preparatory. — Classes in Latin 
Elements, Caesar, Cicero, Greek Ele- 
ments, German and Higher Mathematics 
are offered to persons who wish to pre- 
pare for college This work is in charge 
of a competent instructor. Last year 
this department prepared one young man 
for a leading college in eastern Pa., his 
certificate having been accepted in lieu of 
an examination. 

Commercial. — Five teachers are doing 
work in this department, which offers 
thorough instruction in Book-keeping, 
Commercial Arithmetic, Shorthand, Busi- 
ness Correspondence, Typewriting, etc. 

Music — Daily instruction and practice 
in chorus singing are offered free to all 
regular students. Also Voice Culture, 
Harmony, Theory of Musi'', Piano and 
Organ Lessons are given during the 
spring at usual prices. 

Bible. — Daily classes will be conducted 
in History of the Bible, Exegesis, Hom- 
iletics. Christian Doctrine, Lives of A" 
postles and Biblical Antiquities. 

EXPENSES. 

Tuition, per week, $1 00 

Of day students, per term, $10 00 

Of Boarding Students, $55 00 

The record of the school since its or- 
ganization has inspired confidence in the 
educational and business world, so that 
our students and graduates are in demand 
for positions. Work done during spring 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES. 



terms will ciimit tmvanlH cidnpletintr the 
several courses. Come to Klizal)ethto\vn 
C<)!letire if yon wish to make a success in 
life. Write for catalojzue arifl ei)f,'atre a 
room at once. All iiKjuiries will 1)(> 
(ticerfiilly answered upon application to 

TflK Ki:(iISTK.\K. 

The Bible Term. 

Our last Bihle Term lastinu; from Jan. 
7 to Jan. 21 was full of spiritual interest 
and educational value. Over three 
hundred persons enrolled, some for the 
whole term of twf) weeks, and others for 
less time. We trust that all of these * 
have received touches of divine ins])ira- 
tion, and that they have Koue out from 
this plac • with greater love for tJie Bihle 
and more zeal foe the advancement of the 
cause of Christ. We pray that no one 
may attend these meetings with the 
sole purpose of havinj? a good time and 
thus neglect "theone thing most needful." 
An extract from a letter of a sister who 
came to he si)iritually benefited reads 
thus: ".Miss .Myer, you can't imagine 
how J miss the religious atmosphere 
which 1 was allowed to breathe into my 
system dnriuii my stay with you. Of 
course I am full of it, and as it has been 
so precious to me, I want to tell others 
about the precious Word. I am resolved 
to press onward and upward in the 
Christian race. I take my hymnal daily 
to sing the tiymns we sang together, and 
imagine I hear all voices as I heard them 
then. 1 trust that the dear Lord may 
bless and prosper Elizabethtown College 
in tlie future as in the past." 

The evangelistic services conducted 
during the last week by El(i. Kurtz .Miller 
were intensely interesting and resulted in 
fifteen conversions. Twelve of these 
were baptized Sunday, Jan. 28, 190«. 

A number of our friends who enjoyed 
the Bible Term with us, have expressed 
tfieir desire to become regular students. 
Some have already set the time when 
they hope to enroll. Others are waiting 



for an opportunity to come. 

We are grateful to all who have in any 
way encouraged us in our Bil)le Term 
work, and especially thankful to Brethren 
S. H. Ilertzler, J. Kurtz Miller, I. N. H. 
Beahm. D. C. Reber, H. K. Ober and 
B. F. Wampler for the excellent services 
rendered in class work daily ; and to 
Brethren J H". Witmer, Wm. B. Zimmer- 
man, J H. Richard, A. L B. Martin and 
J. M. Mohler for the earnest sermons 
they gave us during the first week of the 
P.ible Term. * E. M. 



Lake. 

It has been suggested by a number of 
persons that a laKe on the Col lege campus 
would be "a thing of beauty" and, there- 
fore, "a joy forever;" and that further, 
it would be a source of much utility It 
would furnish pleasant diversion the year 
round. Students cotild boat in the fall 
and in the spring, and skate during the 
winter. Now, l.oatins and skating are 
among the finest exeicises. 

But if this lake does not come within a 
year, two years or more, let ng not be 
disappointed nor lose sight of the many 
advantages which it would bring. The 
campus resources are at hand. If some 
one would make it his business to lead 
off in the enterprise and continue to 
develop interest until sufficient funds 
would be ready, it would certainly be 
a benefaction. 

Just think for a moment how a beauti- 
ful lake of a half acre or more of crystal 
water, surrounded by a nice wall and 
walk, and embellished by beautiful trees, 
would attract the aesthetic eye. Even 
with the eye of imagination one may see 
anywhere from three to six boats, all 
with special names, sailing on the smooth 
surface, with a neat little boat-house on 
the shore. 



Master Hariy Zoll h;^s moved into the 
state of Ohio where he is to become a 
little '•Buckej'e." 



OUR COIvIvEGE TIMES. 



Society Notes. 

Interest in the Literary Society is 
increasing. At every Executive session 
we receive new members. Tlie willing- 
ness of the members in performing their 
duties on program is another evidence ot 
progress. 

Our new members are Misses Ethel 
Reese, Anna Hoffer, Susan Miller, Kath- 
ryn Ziegler, and Messrs. Hiram Gibble, 
Ray G ruber and Geo. Risser. 

At the session of February 9th, Dr. 
Reber in an impromptu address men- 
tioned seven characteristics of an ideal 
student: desire to know, teachableness, 
patience, earnestness, power of concentra- 
tion, metiiodical habits and high ideal. 

Prof. Wampler delivered an oration 
entitled "The Mother of England," in 
which he paid an eloquent tribute to the 
late Queen Victoria. 

A special feature of the Society is the 
music furnished by the Glee Club. Their 
efforts are appreciated. Calls to render 
music at Institutes have been received. 

Our debates are very interesting and 
beneficial to the students. Boldness to 
speak in public and independence in 
thinking are gained in debating. 

The following questions have been 
debated : Resolved, That an orator ap- 
peals more to the reason than to the 
feelings of an audience. 

Resolved, That an inventor benefits 
mankind more than a reformer. 

Resolved, Tliat students derive more 
benefit from the Literary Society than 
from their regular studies. 

Resolved, That the United States haf^ 
the most perfect form of government ever 
possessed by any nation. 

Resolved, That superstition has a great- 
er inauence upon the ignorant than logic. 

Resolved, That immigration to the 
United States should be prohibited. 

Our ofl3cers for the present term are : 
Pres. Mr. P. B.Eshelman; V. Pres. Mr. 
1. W. Singer; Secretary, Miss Leah M. 
Sheaffer; Editress, Miss Ada Little; Critic, 
Miss Elizabeth Myer. L. D. R. 



Dedication. 

The dedication of Memorial Hall will 
take place on March 4. The dedication 
of the original building took place on 
March 4, 1901, so that the second dedica- 
tion will be on the fifth anniversary of 
the first, and the fourth of March will be 
made the more memorable on College 
Hill. At Washington they dedicate 
presidents, or inaugurate them, on the 
fourth of March; on College Flill, we are 
accustoming ourselves also to make prom- 
inent this memorable day in our national 
history. We are looking forward with 
much interest to the dedication of Mem- 
orial Hall. It promises to be a feast of 
good things to all those who attend, and 
many there are who are intimating their 
desire and intention to be present on that 
occasion. By a glance at the program of 
work in another column of this issue, you 
may discover the nature and real merit ot 
the work expected. Do not fail to be 
present Arrange in ample time before 
hand. Come ! Welcome ! 



Encouraging. 

At present, as we view the spring term 
patronage, the prospect is, that we shall 
have quite a few new students who are 
now teaching and others who are think- 
ing of taking up teaching. Such persons, 
having a definite purpose, usually make 
excellent students. 

We are arranging too, to give special 
opportunities in our class work for such 
students. It is with pleasure that we 
look forward to the spring term class 
work. A number of new classrooms in 
the new building will be open for service. 
Indeed, our facilities in general are quite 
improved. 

Therefore, dear young people, aspiring 
to the noble work of teaching, and others 
aspiring to higher efficiency in the work, 
we shall welcome you into our midst. 
Come, we shall do you good ! 



Spring Term opens Monday, March 19. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES. 



€>ur College %imts. 



EDITORIAL STAFF. 

EDITOR IN CHIEF : 

1. N. II. BEAHM. 

ASSOCIATE EPITOKS: 

D. C. REBER, NATHAN MARTIN 

ELIZABETH MEYER 

SPECIAL EDITORS : 

Local Editor, - - - RUTH STAYER 

Society Editor. - - - - L. D. ROSE 

BUSINESS MANAGEMENT : 

Managing Editor and Business Manager, 

H. K. OBER 

ASSOCIATES : 

J. Z. HERR, E. ROY ENGLE 

Our College Times is published bi-monthly. 
Sub.scription price (six numbers) 25 cents, single 
copy 5 cents. 



Enroll. 

Spring Term. 

The old Chapel is now Music Hall. 

Get ready for the Sprinsr term. 

The music department is growing. 

This number of "O. C. T" is bristling 
with news 

Do not fail to hear Drs. Schaeffer and 
Lyte March 5. 

Class work in part has been moved to 
Memorial Hall. 

The dedication services of Memorial 
Hall promise to be largely attended. 

Dr. Reber visited a number of schools 
Feb. 19 and 20. He made good reports. 

The Folder announcing dedication pro- 
gram is a handsome one. C^ite a sou- 
venir. 

President Beahm will officiate at the 
new Brethren Church in Gettysburg 
latter part of March, at the dedication 
services. 

Prof. W. B. Stoddard, of Washington, 
D. C. visited the College, Feb. 20. He 
officiated at chapel service, and delivered 
an excellent address. 



The Typewriting Department has been 
hemmed in closely all year till now. 
Migs Ffigelsanger has a neat room for the 
department in Memorial Hall. 

Prof. Wampler has written a new song 
— words and music, which he christens 
"Dedication Song." Be ready to hear 
it on March 5. 

Brother Beahtn is to deliver an address 
in Philadel|)hia Mar. 18 at the Christian 
Convention under the management of 
Prof. W. B. Stoddard. 

The Winter Term enrollment is 100, 
which is the largest term enrollment we 
have yet had in the history of the institu- 
tion. The Bible Term enrollment reached 
321. 

Nathan Martin is arranging to have 
the dedication work preserved. Short 
hand and typewriting will be convenient 
to put these rich things into the archives 
of the College. 

The teachers and students manifest a 
desire to vie with each other in keeping 
the hall and rooms neat and orderly. 
We congratulate these people on their 
cozy and han<lsome quarters. 

A number of teachers have already 
expressed their intention to be with us 
during the Spring Term. There will be 
special opportunity for those who are 
teaching, or who are expecting to teach. 

Your editor in chief attended a local 
institute at Deodate, Feb. 15. The pro- 
gram was well arranged and creditably 
executed. Conewago township is a 
working one. His address was well 
received. 

The College is very much gratified at 
the success being achieved by Ihe young 
teachers who have gone out into the field. 
The institution may well adopt the beaut- 
iful language of the beloved Disciple, 
"1 have no greater joy than to hear that 
mv chidren walk in truth." 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES. 



Mr. VVilmer E. Knrtz, of Lancaster has 
donated a verj^ interesting book to the 
College Library. The book is a character 
analysis of literary persons. It abounds 
in wit and satire. The author is Bangs. 



H. H. Stayer, formerly of eastern shore 
of Maryland, has become the College 
janitor. He moved his family to College 
Hill where he now resides snugly and is 
engaged in his vocation of furnishing 
steam, which he has done for a number 
of years. 

The Trustees have not yet adopted a 
name for tne original building. Prom- 
inent among suggestions is "Alpha Hall," 
Alpha being the name of the first Greek 
letter, and means beginning, or first. If 
you have a better name, send it at once 
to S. H. Hertzler or T. F. Imler. 



Brother Reuben Shroyer, of Canton' 
Ohio, officiated at the chapel services, 
January 31 . He also addressed the school 
in an interesting and helpful way. We 
were very glad to have Bro Shroyerwith 
US and were also delighted to hear him 
say that he would return to Ohio carrying 
a good report from Elizabethtown College. 
It would be very interesting to have 
some Ohio talent in out student body. 
Why not have a few from the Buckeye 
state? Who will be the first? 

The fourth story of Memorial Hall, 
which is the top story, containing fourteen 
neat and beautiful dormitories, was occu- 
pied for the first time on Saturday, Feh. 
2d, at which time there was a great 
exodus of young men from tlie original 
building. This moving of men and books, 
of trunks and trinkets, was the biggest 
'"flitting" that has ever taken place on 
College Hill in so short a time. Among 
the number, the faculty is represented 
in the persons of Profs. Davis and Herr. 



Owing to the increased number of both 
instrumental and voice pupils at the 
College, the Board of Trustees were asked 
to purchase another {.liano in order to 
meet the demands for the work. The 
Board of Trustees carefully and kindly 
considered the matter and appointed a 
committee, who have purchased an up- 
right Cunningham piano. The com- 
mittee did not hesitate to buy the Cun- 
ningham this time, since the one pur- 
chased last September has given such 
eminent satisfaction. B. F. W. 

"Our College Times." 

This is the last number of the volume 
of the second year of "Our Colle^'e Times," 
therefore our paper will soon enter upon 
the third year of its existence. These 
two years have marked gratifying devel- 
opment and progress in the history of 
our work, and we bespeak for the future 
sinnlar and even greater strides of pro- 
gress. Prudence, persistence and patience 
are capable of reaping a bountiful harvest. 
Our numt)er of regular subscribers should 
vastly increase. 

Many encouraging words have been 
spoken with regard to the paper, and we 
close the second volume with thanks- 
giving for tfie past and hopefulness for 
the future. 



Bible Term Educational Meetinq. 

The first public meeting held in the 
new chapel of Elizabethtown College was 
an educational meeting, which convened 
Jan. 13, 1.30 P. M. 

The opening exercises consisted of 
reading the 90th psalm and prayer by 
the moderator, Dr. D. C. Reber. 

Prof. I. N. H. Beahm gave tt'e opening 
address, which was very appropriate to 
the occasion. 

Elizabeth Myer tfien told what educa- 
tion is, that it included body, mind and 
soul culture. 

The third question on the program was 
"The Religious Value of Education." 



OUR COLLKGE TIMES. 



This was alily (lipcuHsed liy Eldfr S. H. 
Hertzler. His priiu'ii)ai thonjiht was that 
the educated christian man is of more 
service to God and man, than the chris- 
tian without an education. 

H. B. Mohler, of Diilsburg, told of 
"The Financial Value of Education." 
The value could not be counted in dollars 
and cents only. 

The fifth speaker was Elder 8. R. Zug, 
who took his hearers back sixty-five 
years to his school days, and in so doing 
showed a vivi:! contrast between that 
time and present day opportunity for se- 
curing education. 

Elder Jesse Ziegler, President of Board 
of Trustees, was to tell "The Present Day 
Demands for an Education." His not 
being able to be present, the questic>n 
was ably discussed by Prof. H. K. Ober. 
Among the good things he said was, the 
uneducated man has the field for his 
world, the educated man the world for 
his field. 

Religious attitude of Brethren Colleges 
was discussed by Elder J. M. Mohler, of 
Lewistown, Pa. He said the Brethren 
aimed not only to give their students the 
best intellectual training, but at the same 
time teach the w))ole gospel. 

The general discussion was very inter- 
esting, forty speeches being made. 

Elizabeth Zortman, Sec'y. 



Keystone Literary Society Notes. 

The Society hold its regular Literary 
Session, Friday evening the 16th. It was 
an interesting session throughout. 

Inauguration of ofiicers was the main 
feature of the program. TI)e newly 
elected President, Mr. Eshelman, deliv- 
ered a fitting inaugural address. 

Miss Reese gave a recitation in an 
entertaining style. 

An essay entitled "Character Building" 
by Miss McDannel, was well received. 

Regular debate was intensely interest- 
ing. The speakers advanced many strong 



Jirguments. General debate was made 
li^'ely by many numbers speaking from 
the bottom of their liearts. 

The "Echo" by the newly elected 
editor, Miss Little, came up to the stan- 
dard. 

Our next session will be held Mar. 2 
at 7:30 o'clock. We look for an 
excellent debate, several well-prepared 
recitations and special music. i-. D R. 

Missionary IVieeting Notes. 

An interesting Missionary Meeting was 
held on the last day of the Bible Term, 
at 10 a. m., Jan. 20. 

"What is a Missionary?" was abiy 
discussed by EUi. S. H. Hertzler. Many 
talks followed this discussion in the two- 
minute speeches which followed. 

Sister .Maggie Shelley read a well 
prepared paper on "Discuss Female Mis- 
sionaries named in the Bible." 

Sister Mary Rider gave a rich and 
earnest talk on .Mothers as Missionaries. 

Following these topics nas the Question 
Box which proved an inspiring feature. 

Bro. Wampler conducted the music. 
The meeting was full of the Missionary 
spirit, and the co-operation of the many 
present with the moderator, Eld. Zug, 
together with the good talks given by 
those appointed topics all served to make 
this an interesting, as well as a successful 
meeting. J. G. Meyer. 



An Appreciated Gift. 

Brother Fred R. Zook, a ministerand a 
foundryman, lives in Martinsburg, Blair 
county. Pa. 

Through the generosity of brother 
Zook we have a bell of his own manu- 
facture, as a present to the College. This 
bell, weighing over two hundred pounds, 
is in the tower of Memorial Hall ard 
peals for us at stated periods its sonorous 
sounds. The music of a school bell is 
always appreciated by the school folk. 
As these rousing, inviting, and jubilant 



OUR COLI^EGE TIMES. 



sounds are waved outward and onward, 
they are easily translated into "Zook, 
Zook, Zook." 

The charming sound which radiates 
from the Zook bell awakens the sleeping 
student at early morn, calls him to Chap- 
el, rings him to class, puts him to study 
and timely soothes him to slumber after 
the curtain of night has fully dropped 
upon the College Campus. 

Here is a vote of thanks for the manu- 
facturer, and "Our College Times" ex- 
tends a hearty invitation to come down. 
Pay us a visit, brother. 



Pavements. 

We are very glad to have had so many 
improvements from time to time on 
College Hill. Among some of the thinjzs 
which we yet need is sufficient pavement 
about tlie College. No one so far has 
expressed a more hearty appreciation of 
this present need than Bro. S. G. Gray- 
bill, one of the Trustees. He sees the 
utility and the scope of the work very 
clearly, and no man would be better 
suited to take the matter in hand and to 
carry it to a finish. It is hoped that the 
Board of Trustees may see proper to 
appoint him chaiiman of a committee, 
whose duty it shall be to furnish cement 
walks in accord with the demands. He 
has the "push" and the grit." Let us 
have the walks. 



Dr. ReV)er is making an excellent dona- 
tion to the College in the way of 30 hand- 
some tablet arm chairs to be placed in 
recitation room "A". 



Sister Martha Martin's excellent report 
of the S. S. Meeting on Jan. 20, by 
mistake was crowded out of this issue. 
It is in type, and will appear in May 
number. 



Resolutions of Sympathy. 

Whereas, it has pleased our Heavenly 
Father to remove by death one of our 
highly esteemed friends and patrons, 
Isaacs S. Gibble, and 

Whereas, by the death of the father, 
the family circle has been severed, and 
where once, by his presence, hearts were 
gladdened, now reigns sorrow and mourn- 
ing, therefore be it 

Resolved, That the faculty and students 
of Ellzahethtown College tenderly ex- 
press their sympathy and condolence in 
that they deeply feel and regret the loss 
of this patron, l)e it 

Resolved, That although we can only 
realize in part this great sorrow, yet we 
believe that God in His infinite wisdom 
knoweth and doeth ail things best, and 
we submissively say, "Thy will be done," 
be it 

Res<.'lvcd, That a copy of these resolu- 
tions be sent to the family of our deceas- 
ed patron, and that they he published in 
"Our College Times" and the Elizabeth- 
town "Chionicle." 

H. K. Ober, 

Elizabeth McDannel, }-Com. 

J. F. Graybill, 



Subscribe for "Our College Times." 



Resolutions of Sympathy. 

Whereas, The Eeath Angel has again 
visited the home of one of our patrons, J. 
W. Meyer, and removed from the family 
circle the beloved infant son, Solomon 
Meyer; 

Whereas, In the home thus saddened 
are represented both the Faculty and stu- 
dent body of this institution; therefore, 
be it 

Resolved, That we, the Faculty and stu- 
dents of Elizabethtown College, hereb}' 
express our heartfelt sympathy for the 
bereaved family; arid, commending them 
to a loving Father's care, share with them 
the assurance that he has only gone to be 
with Him whose "loving kindness is bet- 
ter than life." 

i?eso/r«?, That a copy of these resolu- 
tions be sent to the family thus bereft and 
that they be published in "The College 
Times," "Elizabethtown Chronicle" and 
"Lebanon News " 

Nathan Martin, 

Chas. Bower, )■ Com. 

B. Mary Royer. 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES. 



Exchange Department. 

— We are giad to recognize among our 
exchanges this month the Marijnette 
College Journal, published in Milwaukee, 
Wisconsin. The Journal announces its 
purpose thuF : "The object of the Mar- 
quette College Journal is to aid the stu- 
dents in their literary work, to reflect 
their college life, and to serve as a 
medium of communication between 
undergraduates and alumni." 

For variety of productions — literary, 
scientific, general and department news — 
we find few to excel it. On the mechan- 
ical side, good taste is evident throughout. 
Altogether, the Journal is such a imbli- 
cation as most of our colleges might well 
raise their price to pattern after. 

— Born in a lowly station of life, and 
being unprepossessing by nature, a no 
more flattering prospect beckoned young 
Socrates to the future than does many of 
us. But, as the richest nuggets of gold 
are found at the bottom of a mass of rub- 
bish, so the brightest intellect and purest 
soul are sometimes found in an ungainly 
body. 

He was a self-made man. Not being 
blest with many of the educational ad- 
vantages of his time, he was left to gain 
his knowledge of life by actual contact 
with the sturdy world. But this of all 
things was best adapted to develop his 
originality of thought and the peculiar 
bent of his genius. 

Unlike many people of to-day, Socrates 
did not court popular favor. What was 
right in his eyes was right from principle: 
what was wrong from principle was 
wrong. 

Socrates was a man of purpose. * * 
Socrates was not primarily a soldier or a 
statesman. He was a philosopher, a re- 
ligious missionary making the world 
better. He was emphatically a teacher, 
a trainer. * * His one purpose was to 
remove conceit, dispel ignorance, teach 
truth. * * As a moral teacher he ex- 



celled. For institntiiiu; and teaching the 

purest code of morals the world had ever 

seen, he will never he fully appreciated. 

"Socrates" by J S F. in Philomathean. 

— There is a power behind the throne 
which rules kingdon) and emf)ire, society 
and religion, nature and mankind. Does 
not investigation reveal tons that some- 
thing else than the wisdom of the king is 
swaving the scepter; that sonte other 
power than the bishop or pope is directing 
the religious movements; that some silent 
force, not the noisy thunder, impels 
nature to act; that a man is what he is, 
not because of his deeds nierely, but 
because of the manhood for wliich he 
stands. 

The teacher who has the firm t)asis of a 
strong character, as a foundation to sup- 
port his knowledge, is tlie teacher who is 
most efficient in real education. 

If a nation would continue its strength 
and vitality, down through the ages, it 
must have wise statesmen, pure institu- 
tions, honest citizens, and have God as a 
power behind the throne. If we as indi- 
viduals would increase our influence, 
expect more from our labors, let us have 
a spotless character for the power behind 
the throne — College Campus. 

— Opportunities come as the ships come, 
borne onward by the wind and tide of 
circumstance, but dependent also on 
human will and endeavor — California 
Student. 

— Your investment in the minds and 
memories of the f)eople is the safest thing 
you own. — Purple and Gold. 

Nathan Martin. 



W. H. Thomas and C. S. Livengood 
finished their diploma course in Com- 
mercial Department and leave for other 
fields. They made many warm friends 
at College 



OUR COLLEGE TIMES. 



Locals. 

Miss Nellie Hartman, a former student, 
has recently accepted a position in Leb- 
anon, and reports success in her new 
work. 

Mr. Samuel Richard of Maitland, Pa., 
has returned home, but expects to be 
with us again next year. We miss his 
presence and are sorry he could not stay. 

Elder J. Kurtz Millei', who was with 
us during Bible Term, gave his farewell 
talk to the students on Tuesday Jan. 23, 
which was very effective and much ap- 
preciated by the students. 

Many friends visited the College during 
the Bible Term. Those who conducted 
the chapel exercises during these two 
weeks are as follows: Brethren, Wm. B. 
Zimmerman, J. H. Richard. A. L. B. 
Martin, J. M. Mohler, E. B. Brubaker, 
Jesse ZeiL'Ier, J. Kurtz Miller, H. B. 
Mohler, A M. KuhnsandS. R. Zug. 

Bro. E. B. BrnV)aker attended the Bible 
Term a short while and was so much in- 
terested that several days after his return 
home, he sent eight others up. They 
drove from home, a distance of 20 miles, 
and reached colleae in time for chapel. 

Mr. Frey, a former student, took an 
active part in debate on Friday evening, 
Feb. 9. 

Miss Mazie Martin, a student of last 
Spring, was visiting her many friends at 
College, Jan. 13th and 14th. 

Mrs. Martin Shaeffer, of Bareville, paid 
a visit to her daughter. Miss Leah Shaef- 
fer, Jan. 28, 1906. 

Mrs. Amanda Myer, of Bareville, was a 
guest of her daughter, Miss Elizabeth 
Myer and also her niece Miss Shaffer, 
Jan. 27 and 28. 

Mrs. Wampler enjoyed a visit from her 
mother, Mrs. M. A. Good, and her sister. 
Miss Edna, over Christmas vacation. 

During the first week of Bible Term 



the preaching services were conducted 
on Sunday evening by Bro. J. H. Witmer, 
of Hanoverdale; on Monday evening 
by Bro. VVm. Zimmerman, of Juniata 
county; on Tuesday evening, by Bro. J. 
H. Richard, of Mifflin county; on 
Wednesday evening by Bro. A. L. B. 
Martin, pastor of the Harrisburg church; 
and on Thursday evening by Bro. Joha 
M. Mohler, of Lewistown, Pa. 

Mr. and Mrs. Amos S. Earhart, of Man- 
heim, spent Sunday, Jan. 28, at Eliz- 
abethtown College as the guests of their 
son, Mr. L. B. Earhart. 

Mr. Christian Gibbel, of Brunnerville, 
enjoyed a visit from his parents, Mr. and 
Mrs, Cyrus Gibbel, Sunday, Jan. 21. 

The following persons were the guests 
of Miss Sallie A. Miller, on Sunday, Jan. 
28: Her mother, Mrs. J. S. Miller, Mr. 
and Mrs. EzraGraybill andson, J. Homer 
and Mr. John K. Miller. 

Elder Reuben Schroyer, of Canton, 
Ohio, preached a good sermon in the new 
Chapel, Sunday, Jan. 29. During the 
week following he officiated at chapel 
service and gave a fine talk to the stu- 
dents. R. S. 

The Heiseys, Etc. 

Among the leading spirits of tfie work- 
ers on Memorial Hall, Bro. Joseph Heisey 
a member of. the building committee, and 
Mr. D. L. Heisey the architect and fore- 
man, have perhaps given more personal 
attention than any other two men. We 
take pleasure, therefore, in making hoa- 
orable mention of them in connection 
with the active interest and faithful 
personal service rendered during tfie 
progress of the work. 

Bro. B. G. Groff has all the while been 
acting chairman of the building com- 
mittee. He has kept a faithful super- 
vision of the work. Bro. J. H. Rider has 
also taken a very deep interest in the 
progress of the building, and his frequent 
visits to the place are always appreciated. 



iidef I Son 



sell 

Builders' Hardware 



Stoves, Ranges, Heaters, Washing Machines, 

Wringers, &c. 

We'll Try to Please You. 




♦ ♦ ♦ 



T 



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B. C. GOF F & SON 

CONTRACTORS AND 
BUILDERS 

Coal, Grain, Feed, 

Lumber and Stone, 



ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 
♦—♦-♦- »-♦ » ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ^ »-♦ 

JOS. D. HOLLINGER 

Home-made Tinware, 
Spouting, &c, 

DoakT in 

STOVES, HEATERS AND FURNACES. 

RooFiNii AND Tin Roof Painting a Specialty. 
Coal Oil and Gasoline. 



NISSLEY'S 

Licli I DiiiiiifiRoofflS 

Lancaster; Pa* 

Opposite P. R. R. Station. 1 4 E. Chestnut St. 

PURE DELICIOUS QUICK 

ft. GftNSMftN 



MANTFACTrRER OF 



"^y^" CLOTHING 

Plain Clothing a Specialty. 

66 and 68 North Queen, I ^^^^^^.^ 

S.W. Cor. Orange St., Lancasier 

10 Per Cent. Discount to Students. 



D. H. 7VT 7^ R T I N 

Clothing and Gents' Furnishings 

Centre Square, Elizabethtown, Pa. 



A. W, Martin 

COAL, WOOD. GRAIN 
FLOUR AND FEED 

Telephone 

Elizabethtown^ Penna* 

GEO. D. BOGGS & SON 



DEALERS IN 



STOVES, RANGES, 
HOUSEFURNISHING GOODS, 

AND A FULL LINE OF 

HARDW^ARE 

Call to see us, we will supply your wants. 
S. Market St., Elizabethtown, Pa. 



H* S* Hottenstein 

GABINET-MAKER 

AND UNDERTAKER 

A full line of FURNITURE always 
on hand. Call to see me. My lines will 
please you. Undertaking carefully at- 
tended to. 

Elizabethtow^n, Pa. 

J. RALPH GROSS 
SHAVING AND HAIRCUTTINQ 
PARLOR 
Hair Sinj^eing a Specialty 

S. Market St. ELIZABETHTOWN. 



Hornafius' Cafe 

ICE CREAM, 

SODA WATER 

Fine Line of Confections always on hand. 

Meals at All Hours. 



The Enlarged 

BOOK STORE 

Means Better Service. 

CALL TO SEE ME. 

G. N. Falkenstein 

Books, Stationery and School Supplies 

Elizabethtown, Pa. 



Geise 3c McBride 




Page Wire Fence a Specialty 

FARM IMPLEMENTS 

AGENTS FOR 

New Holland Gasoline Engines, Universal 
Plows, Grain Drills, Owego Wagons, Etc. 

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA. 



HARRY MILLER 
Cabinet A/laker and Undertaker 

A FULL LINE OF FURNITURE 
S. Market St., Elizabethtown, Pa. 



THe ET^^GLe lavnzm swing 

Built to Accommodate Four Passengers. Write For Booklet and Prices 

M a II u f a c - 
tured entirely 
of steel, with 
the exception 
of the slats in 
seats and plat- 
form. 




Manufactured bv A. B U C H ' S SONS CO 



The most 
beautiful de- 
sign and pleas- 
ing motion of 
any swing in- 
troduced. 

Sold entirely 
on its merits. 
Elizabethto w n , Pa. 




--^"^of 



WEAVER ?JS^Si 

EASY TO OPERATE 
HARD TO WEAR OUT 

Write For Catalogue and Prices to the 



L.A.lSrOASTEI^ •W^-A.P^EI^OOliwlS 



S3S E3A.ST K:i1-TC3- ST. 



WEAVE-R Q-RGA/N & PIA/NQ COMPA/Ny. 
ALL THE NEWS IN THE 

Elizabethtown Chronicle 

ONLY THE BEST JOB PRINTING 
I N ni WFII PR ^^^^ VALUES, EXCELLENT WORKMANSHIP, HONEST PRICES. 

U. 11. ULftLILLIl This represents our CLOTHING and yHOES, 

as well as all other lines. 

AGENT FDR LEBANDN STEAM LAUNDRV 
J. N. OLWEILER. '^'-S7^^'f^^''t^^§HKR ELIZABETHTOWN. PA. 




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